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ftwizard

Fixing loose pallet fork jewel

Question

I have a loose jewel, as per the title. It's only a spare movement, so I don't want to buy a replacement fork.

I don't have, nor have I ever used, Shellac. It's not a route I want to take just for one jewel.

The question is, what else can I use to re-fix the jewel. Superglue maybe?

 

Edited by ftwizard

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1 minute ago, ftwizard said:

I have a loose jewel, as per the title. It's only a spare movement, so I don't want to buy a replacement fork.

I don't have, nor have I ever used, Shellac. It's not a route I want to take just for one jewel.

The question is, what else can I use to re-fix the jewel.

Hmm, not sure if you want to be told you can use super-glue? One stick is £7.30 from Cousins UK, I don't think that would break the bank.

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Not much heat, you typically use a spirit lamp.

Have a look through Marks videos, he has one covering re setting an impulse jewel and procedure required. The principal is the same for a pallet fork.

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A palate fork jewel requires a special tool to hold the palate fork in place to heat the palate fork and melt the shellac. I have replaced many impulse jewels and have made a few videos on YouTube on how to do it. Search for jdrichard01 on YouTube.


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I am very new to this watch repair malarkey, but, I know that knotting compound, for painting on wood prior to priming, is made up of shellack suspended in alcohol. I would try to daub the pallet jewel with this knotting compound. The alcohol will evaporate very quickly leaving the shellack holding the jewel in place. I'd probably daub it several times using a very fine oiler. If there is someone out there who thinks this is a bad idea, please tell me and kindly explain why. Best wishes, Mark 

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4 hours ago, MarkL said:

I am very new to this watch repair malarkey, but, I know that knotting compound, for painting on wood prior to priming, is made up of shellack suspended in alcohol. I would try to daub the pallet jewel with this knotting compound. The alcohol will evaporate very quickly leaving the shellack holding the jewel in place. I'd probably daub it several times using a very fine oiler. If there is someone out there who thinks this is a bad idea, please tell me and kindly explain why. Best wishes, Mark 

buy a vintage pallet warmer from ebay or you can use a bluing pan or tin over an alcohol lamp. I highly doubt you will be able to use the existing shellac since the jewel is already loose, its not like your just making an adjustment, the damage is already done. but i would say its worth a try. i think the issue your going have with knotting solution is holding the pallet jewel in place for 15-20 minutes, which is how long it takes for the solution to dry. if its dries in the wrong spot you will be back to square one. Plus the consistency of alcohol based shellac is very thin and has no holding power. pure shellac is very thick and sticky almost like honey when its heated correctly and it dries fairly quick.

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I buy shellac for woodwork by weight at the hardware store. I don't doubt the friendly guy there would give me few leaves for free. I don't know if it can be used for watchmaking but if anyone wants to try I can mail a small quantity for postage.

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22 hours ago, jdm said:

I buy shellac for woodwork by weight at the hardware store. I don't doubt the friendly guy there would give me few leaves for free. I don't know if it can be used for watchmaking but if anyone wants to try I can mail a small quantity for postage.

is it pure shellac? as in solid form not liquid?

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