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George19

Seiko 7009-3040 : bent second hand repair

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Hello,

Now going to tackle my second Seiko repair after fixing a displaced 7S26-C rotor/bearing (posted in another thread). I'm still a newbie at all of this, but learning by watching, reading and doing. I'm really enjoying the work, I wonder why I did not learn this art years ago.

I was given a Seiko 7009-3040 automatic for free. I took a look at it and saw that is had a bent second hand. Closer inspection showed the little [ S ] emblem has been disconnected from the face and is rolling around between the dial and the face (show here resting next to the 4 o’clock position. It was actually in the day/date window hiding at first. After a bit of tapping it came out.

I was thinking it might be not too hard to fix?  Separate the  movement from the case of course. Then glue the [ S ] emblem back in place on the dial using a very small amount of super glue. I can see two small holes for mounting. Bend the second hand back to straight.

So the real questions are

  • is super glue OK for this application, I would assume to let the dial stay out of the case for a day or two to protect the rest from 'glue fogging'.
  • looking a the second hand, I'm almost sure it just might break if I try to straiten it?
  • had anyone else seen this happen, the emblem falling off and fouling the hands?

Thank you very much in advance.

Cheers

IMG_20190402_150903.jpg

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Yepp . The emblem is best glued from the back. you will get glue on the dial if you glue it from the front . Or the emblem will stick before it's fully in . So put the emblem in the hole and add a small dab of superglue on the tab from the inside. 

The second can be straighten if you are careful . Hold it with a tweezer and carefully bend it. Whats is hard is that the paint could crack. 

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14 minutes ago, rogart63 said:

Yepp . The emblem is best glued from the back. you will get glue on the dial if you glue it from the front . Or the emblem will stick before it's fully in . So put the emblem in the hole and add a small dab of superglue on the tab from the inside. 

The second can be straighten if you are careful . Hold it with a tweezer and carefully bend it. Whats is hard is that the paint could crack. 

So you have seen this before?

Definitely sounds good to what you suggested, glue from the back. I wonder, is glue what held it in the first place? Looks like this one will be the first that I have to remove and re-install hands. Time for a new too, more learning and practice.

Second hand is painted? I learned something more each day, this being the second watch I have ever worked on.

I'll post some images when I get to the repair. Really appreciate the response.

Cheers

Edited by George19

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26 minutes ago, George19 said:

So you have seen this before?

Definitely sounds good to what you suggested, glue from the back. I wonder, is glue what held it in the first place? Looks like this one will be the first that I have to remove and re-install hands. Time for a new too, more learning and practice.

Second hand is painted? I learned something more each day, this being the second watch I have ever worked on.

I'll post some images when I get to the repair. Really appreciate the response.

Cheers

Many times. No idea what kind of glue they use. Think any glue will be fine. As long as it's not a big bloob of glue. Superglue works fine . As long as you let it dry before you put it back. To avoid the "glue fogging" 

 

I didn't look properly. I  thought it looked black. But when i look now i see that it's silver. Then it's no paint on it. 

Edited by rogart63

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Bend slowly and carefully, inspecting as you go to make sure you are straightening and not putting a correcting bend in if you follow me. And yep, I’ve had loose emblems and hour batons. Always apply glue from back and leave for a couple of days. And post pics of how you get on ;)


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Be aware that superglue and some optics don't get on very well. Some types of coated glass, camera lenses for example may be damaged by the cynoacrylate (superglue) fumes.

Try to avoid getting it on acrylic crystals too, although it would probably be possible to polish small spots of superglue from the surface of an acrylic crystal. 

Use a pin to transfer the glue in to the spot you want. I tend to use the cheaper stuff, not just 'cos I'm cheap, before someone suggests that, but because it tends to be thin and watery, rather than thick and rubbery. It also tends to have a longer set up time, which is an advantage. Instantly setting things in the wrong position is a nightmare best avoided.

Superglue is soluble in acetone, but then again, so are some dial finishes. :(

Also, avoid cleaning up superglue spillage with cotton wool, or spilling it on your old frayed jeans... the results can be "interesting". I once accidentally superglued a small spot of my denim jeans to my leg, only to watch in amazement as a small whisp of smoke appeared followed by a stabbing pain from the resulting reaction. The reaction makes for some slightly peril laden fun though.

Edited by AndyHull

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3 hours ago, Pip said:

Bend slowly and carefully, inspecting as you go to make sure you are straightening and not putting a correcting bend in if you follow me. And yep, I’ve had loose emblems and hour batons. Always apply glue from back and leave for a couple of days. And post pics of how you get on ;)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I understand that. I wonder if I need to remove the hand first or bend it on the pivot as is? Looks not to matter, to re-glue the loose emblem anyway the hands and dial will have to come off. Now I'm off to buy a hand remover and more tools.  This is getting interesting, I love it.

Cheers

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4 hours ago, rogart63 said:

Many times. No idea what kind of glue they use. Think any glue will be fine. As long as it's not a big bloob of glue. Superglue works fine . As long as you let it dry before you put it back. To avoid the "glue fogging" 

 

I didn't look properly. I  thought it looked black. But when i look now i see that it's silver. Then it's no paint on it. 

The second hand is black. As mentioned, let the glue dry for at least a day as I have experience on other applications.

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2 hours ago, AndyHull said:

Be aware that superglue and some optics don't get on very well. Some types of coated glass, camera lenses for example may be damaged by the cynoacrylate (superglue) fumes.

Try to avoid getting it on acrylic crystals too, although it would probably be possible to polish small spots of superglue from the surface of an acrylic crystal. 

Use a pin to transfer the glue in to the spot you want. I tend to use the cheaper stuff, not just 'cos I'm cheap, before someone suggests that, but because it tends to be thin and watery, rather than thick and rubbery. It also tends to have a longer set up time, which is an advantage. Instantly setting things in the wrong position is a nightmare best avoided.

Superglue is soluble in acetone, but then again, so are some dial finishes. :(

Also, avoid cleaning up superglue spillage with cotton wool, or spilling it on your old frayed jeans... the results can be "interesting". I once accidentally superglued a small spot of my denim jeans to my leg, only to watch in amazement as a small whisp of smoke appeared followed by a stabbing pain from the resulting reaction. The reaction makes for some slightly peril laden fun though.

I have noted that once the glue is dry, there is no issue. The dial will be out of the watch with as mentioned a very small amount applied from the rear of the dial. (thanks for the heads up folks).

Best part, your last paragraph reminds me of one day with *the glue* also when younger. Put my fingertip to the eyelid once, it was not pretty! Your "whisp of smoke..." and all, good story! On drop also landed in the middle of my prescription eye glasses, I now have a center magnifier spot.

Cheers

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6 hours ago, George19 said:

I understand that. I wonder if I need to remove the hand first or bend it on the pivot as is? Looks not to matter, to re-glue the loose emblem anyway the hands and dial will have to come off. Now I'm off to buy a hand remover and more tools.  This is getting interesting, I love it.

Cheers

I'm not sure that I would try and do anything with the hand still attached, I'd be too frightened of marking the dial or bending the pinion or something; so I'd agree that as you are taking the hands off anyway best to do it then. And also, yes! It's a great and interesting hobby that just keeps getting more interesting the further down the rabbit hole you go!

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First thanks to all that have replied, you make me fell welcome here and that is appreciated.

Well, I've ordered more tools to work on this watch, and others in the future. A hand remover, Rodico, case rest, movement holders, watch press set (for the Timex project), 2ea #3 Dumont tweezers, and a set of real eye loupe's. I can see in the future, oil, oiler's, cleaning machine, better screwdrivers, et all. And down the hole we fall... look forward to it.

Will update once I receive those above and get the time to work on this watch.

Thanks again.

Cheers

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