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Sean

"Craftsman" Pocket Watch circa 1910...any info?

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Gentlemen, I am curious to learn about my everyday carry pocket watch. 

I'm aware that it is Swiss made, and was made around 1910. That it was cased in England, and although a nice watch, isn't worth ten's of thousands. 

Does anyone have info on who actually made this watch?  Are there others here who own or have owned these watches?

Thanks in advance,

Seán

Craftsman 1910 (1).jpg

Craftsman 1910 (2) .jpg

Craftsman 1910 (3) .jpg

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The watch is a little later than you think it cant be before 1924 because that is when the name was first registered

http://mikrolisk.de/show.php?site=280#sucheMarker

Go to the above sight and put the name in the search this will show you a list of companys that had the name registered.

From what I see on the web they all appear to have good quality Swiss lever movements fitted so a picture of that would be helpful they would have been considered a good quality watch at the time but brand names came and went with regularity in those days.

 

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20 minutes ago, wls1971 said:

The watch is a little later than you think it cant be before 1924 because that is when the name was first registered

http://mikrolisk.de/show.php?site=280#sucheMarker

Go to the above sight and put the name in the search this will show you a list of companys that had the name registered.

From what I see on the web they all appear to have good quality Swiss lever movements fitted so a picture of that would be helpful they would have been considered a good quality watch at the time but brand names came and went with regularity in those days.

 

   that name was also used by Sears and Robuck co. in the 1920's and now.   vin

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It was used by a number or watch manufactures over the years, what did sears sell under the name, they seemed to have used it for a range of flat pack self build houses, I assume if you where out when delivered they left it with a neighbour.

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31 minutes ago, wls1971 said:

It was used by a number or watch manufactures over the years, what did sears sell under the name, they seemed to have used it for a range of flat pack self build houses, I assume if you where out when delivered they left it with a neighbour.

   craftsman tools.  and just about everthing !

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36 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

I don't know much about the watch, but the case makers have an interesting history.

http://dennisonwatches.com/history/

 

Whoa!? Shackleton expedition lineage! (a partial joke.) Thank you for this. It is the English lineage of the case maker that turned me away from my initial assumption that this watch was indeed a Sears marketed product. (Sears; Sears/Roebuck was prior to the modern Globalization of our current economy.)

The case is so tight that I cannot get the rear dust cover off without the proper knife (on order). The crystal has been changed at some point to a plastic one which is scratched @ 10 o'clock and is bothersome. What I can open (just barely) with fingernails is very tight and yet the hinges open to just less than 90 degrees. I'm happy with the case and the watch generally speaking, but I don't believe its of the "Craftsman" tools lineage.  

Is it possible to change the crystal back to glass? Rather, is that within a watch makers procedures/protocols. 

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4 hours ago, AndyHull said:

If you have a few quid sloshing about that you don't know what to do with, and you need a Shackleton fix... 

14_1-1.thumb.jpg.eef1d4a27195dfc016f8e27e44ce9556.jpg

 


https://www.willishenryauctions.com/catalogs/military-timepieces-collection-auction-march-18-2017/lot-14-very-fine-explorers-watch/

 

 

My gawd...it's beautiful. Way beyond my pay grade...but beautiful none the less. I wonder why the stem looks like that? 

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2 hours ago, Sean said:

My gawd...it's beautiful. Way beyond my pay grade...but beautiful none the less. I wonder why the stem looks like that? 

It is pretty attractive, but as you say, somewhat pricey. As to the stem, I suspect it hides a cunning mechanism for regulating the watch, but I am no expert.

Edited by AndyHull

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