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Squiffything

The movement collection is growing

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To boost my knowledge of various movements I’ve purchased a few more different clocks. Some in need of a cosmetic clean, some a thorough clean, one is not working at all and one... well just because I liked it :) 

so here they are

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The biggun is a relatively cheap wall clock in the style of a regulator. It needs some casework done. It’s missing the bottom finials ant the bottom center section but it runs well and has kept good time throughout the day, chiming on the hour and half hour. A lovely deep tone. 

The little bird house is a French movement and the first one I’ve been working on. I think it must be an older one and the first time I’ve come across the frame held together with pins rather than nuts on threaded posts. I’ve not taken it apart yet but have given it a bath and an ultrasonic clean of the movement and the parts I could remove. It was horrible, covered in grime and dried out gunk. The face was grubby but of good quality, ceramic of some kind. It has cleaned up lovely. Put back together and it’s running well and chiming on the hour and half hour. It does however have a problem. It’s held in the case by two arms and one has had a very poor repair in the past. I’m going to have to fabricate a new arm as I didn’t like the soldering job that had been done previously.

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The alarm clocks are pretty but cheap Chinese copies. Both running and just needed a cosmetic clean. I do like the white Smiths one. The square one is a Metamec and is not working. It is however made of marble and is really heavy and solid. I’ll enjoy working on this one. 

Finally the red Coral. It is Japanese and lovely. The keeper of the bunch. So stylish.

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Just a quick note, the regulator looks to be a Gustav Becker given the closeness of the winding arbours, have a look and see. The French movement, well I would leave this till you have more experience as it is so easy to snap off a pinion and waste a nice movement and case. 

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hi    take care as jimmy says with the french clock the pivots are pot hard and will not stand abuse so kid gloves with that one, When cleaned they come up lovely and are a nice movement. The mounting straps are what lets these down too easy to over tighten them and either stripped threads or broken ends. Be patient and careful you are hooked now:judge: 

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20 minutes ago, JimmyD said:

Just a quick note, the regulator looks to be a Gustav Becker given the closeness of the winding arbours, have a look and see. The French movement, well I would leave this till you have more experience as it is so easy to snap off a pinion and waste a nice movement and case. 

The french movement is a Japy Freres. It has an embossed seal within the frame which I understand gives the date. According to the inter web it’s the Medaille D'Honneur: 1855 not sure though if these were periods in time or the year of manufacture. I am aware of the delicate build hence why I didn’t try to force the taking apart of the frame. After the initial clean it is running and chiming well.

The pendulum on the wall clock hangs down from the movement and not from a separate hanger attached to the case which is why I don’t think it’s a regulater. I haven’t taken it out of the case yet to have a look at the movement yet. The prancing horse which sits atop of the top adornments has been broken in the past and has been repaired very poorly. I am aware that these can be replaced so will be looking out for one.

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The medal date is when the clock movement or some other innovation was first seen at a clock show, however that is not the date of your clock, they may have used this medal for the next 30 years, however it is a start point. Look for Japy movements with the rack on the front of the movements and try to get a date on that, then you will have an end point. Your movement will fall somewhere in-between those 2 dates. Then if you wish you can look further into it by looking at suspension setup's, case style and hands.

The wall clock is a regulator, the pendulum not being attached to the backboard is of no matter as this went out around the 1870's and millions of regulators were produced with the pendulum attached to the movement. Vienna Regulator is a common name for them, however the vast majority were produced in Germany, Lenzkirch made some outstanding regulators and command high prices. Gustave Becker's are not bad if it is an early one, around the 1900's they lost the solid plates and started with the cut out plates to compete better with the cheaper American ones.  

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Thanks Jimmy, great info as always. I will do some further research. Pleased to know that it is a regulator. Missing pieces found and ordered so I can make the case complete. Gave it a good clean and polish and it’s now looking quite smart.

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Came up nice, the movement comes out easy, just undo the 2 brass ended threaded screws hiden by the dial and it should slip out on the housing bracket rails.

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The second photo has a German wall clock, which is a German striking movement, which operates from springs, mistakenly called a Vienna, which it is not. Vienna regulator clocks are weight driven. A timepiece will have a single weight, strike two weights strike, chime three weights.

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Oh my giddy aunt! may I put a stop to the definition of a "regulator" right now before it gets out of control. I've just spent the lunch hour trying to find out and it is a war zone out there on what is one, what it should have and which type of regulator is which.

Basic definition: a time piece that is accurate to a degree that others measure their time by.

Advanced definition: purely a time piece. no complications, no distractions. run by one or two power trains one running the hands or more running individual hands. No chimes no striking hours these will affect the time keeping.

A power train usually of weights (more accurate than mainsprings) but at the enth degree of accuracy whatever produces the best accuracy of the timepiece.

A heat compensation system. The warmth of the day will change the accuracy of the timekeeping.

Big Bertha, up there, is not a "regulator" It is a  wall clock in a "Viennese Regulator"  style. The style of a "gentleman's" regulator. with its strike. :)

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Having had a try at removing the movement I’m stumped. The nuts holding in on were easy, unscrew and remove. Nope, it has an arm holding it. Getting to the screw holding that arm to the movement needs black belt yoga levels of  skill! After a tiring day in an office emptying of equipment, people and stuff means I’m tired grumpy and deffo not in the mood to take on the challenge. Plus I cannot be arsed to go down the shed to get the socket set to do it properly :). I’ve got a day off on Wednesday so I’ll try again then.

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8 hours ago, oldhippy said:

Vienna regulator clocks are weight driven. A timepiece will have a single weight, strike two weights strike, chime three weights.

Squiiffy's clock is communally called a regulator, however in the 'strictest terms' only one of the above weight driven clocks fit this. This would be a, time only, weight driven, seconds beating, deadbeat escapement. About less than 1% of regulators would fit this category, therefore whether it has weights or not the common view is the 'style' is the thing that determines the name not the function.

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I’ve spent the day working with wood. Staining, glueing, cutting, screwing, waxing and polishing. Big Bertha is now done and I’ve hung her on the wall in the room that will be my work room.

I’m pleased with the way it’s come out and, even though I am a little biased, I think she looks mighty fine :)

 

 

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