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Lubricants to use with Rolex 3135

Question

Would the below list of lubricants be suitable for the Rolex cal.3135 (clone) movement?

 

93e7d4d72eb0dd145c6dfb2e2b5f98ce.jpg

 

For the grease (cannon pinion, keyless) would you prefer to use 9501 or 9504 the moebius chart recommends either.

 

 

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This is from my post a few years ago (2015). If I remember correctly I used all of my suggested lubricants and the watch worked great. However after approx. six months the auto part stopped working efficiently. I re cleaned treated the wheels with epilame (fixodrop) and lubed with HP 500. Since then it has not been off my wrist part from bath time.

 

 

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The epilame is really key, you have to do it. It's a weird quirk of an otherwise bulletproof movement. I think you could use pretty much any synthetic lube and it'd survive as long as you epilame the reversers.


Thanks nick I will look into it. It’s not something I’ve done before


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On 3/15/2019 at 12:44 AM, matabog said:

Lubetta V105 on the reversers instead of Epilame?

Reversers are interesting for lubrication. Some of them you can use the Lubetta V105 Which is basically an oil like 9010 dissolved in a solvent. But Rolex in their tech sheet shows that lubrication only wants to be in a very specific location and nowhere else. So that's why the recommending the surface treatment to keep the oil from spreading.

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On 3/17/2019 at 3:04 PM, matabog said:

I might have been wrong. I had the ETA reversers in my had. I think the rolex ones can be 'dismantled'. So after Epilame, where would you oil those reversers? And with what?

Lubetta V105 was developed I believe by ETA. The Rolex reverse wheels are of a different design. Lubetta I think is  lubricant. Most odd the Rolex reverse wheels have not lubrication.

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On 3/16/2019 at 8:47 AM, JohnR725 said:

Reversers are interesting for lubrication. Some of them you can use the Lubetta V105 Which is basically an oil like 9010 dissolved in a solvent. But Rolex in their tech sheet shows that lubrication only wants to be in a very specific location and nowhere else. So that's why the recommending the surface treatment to keep the oil from spreading.

@JohnR725 So are the reverser wheels oiled on there edges or not ? The diagram shows 'do not oil', in which case what's the point of the epilame? 

I notice that Mark applies a drop of something to the edge of the wheel ( 7min  50s) :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J8WNrtahT4Q

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On 1/25/2020 at 11:13 AM, mikepilk said:

 So are the reverser wheels oiled on there edges or not ? The diagram shows 'do not oil', in which case what's the point of the epilame? 

My understanding is that the clicks or whatever they're called in the reversers have to be absolutely free to move and lubrication would Interfere with that. So epilame treatment is applied to keep lubrication away.  Notice they're using HP 1000 on the center part and there would be a likelihood without surface treatment of that spreading out.

Then you're absolutely correct in the video Mark applies a drop of lubrication on the reverser wheels which by theory would spread to the little clicks and interfere with how they work. But this is lubrication in horology everyone has a different idea if it works for Mark and long term it works for Mark then?

 

 

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The reverser wheels MUST be treated with " Epilame" if not after a while the auto stops functioning correctly. I speak from experience. PS I used HP500 for the reverser parts with no issues the watch has not been off my wrist (apart from bath time) for 4 years now.

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5 hours ago, clockboy said:

The reverser wheels MUST be treated with " Epilame" if not after a while the auto stops functioning correctly. I speak from experience. PS I used HP500 for the reverser parts with no issues the watch has not been off my wrist (apart from bath time) for 4 years now.

@clockboy do you know how long Epilame lasts? And what will dissolve it. Naptha, isopropanol?

I'm about to service a friends 2230 movement which has never been serviced :thumbsd:

And I'm not planning on buying any Epilame just for that! 

(I wonder if there are any cheaper alternatives to Epilame. Mobile phone screens use an oleophobic coating which can be renewed with a wipe on liquid) 

Edited by mikepilk

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I wondered if i clean in naptha then isopropanol it will remove the epilame
It might. It's really critical that they are epilamed, so try to get some. You can't really over epilame, but on these Rolexes you can definitely under epilame.

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11 hours ago, nickelsilver said:
12 hours ago, mikepilk said:
I wondered if i clean in naptha then isopropanol it will remove the epilame

It might. It's really critical that they are epilamed, so try to get some. You can't really over epilame, but on these Rolexes you can definitely under epilame.

You have convinced me. I managed to buy just 5ml 

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37 minutes ago, rodabod said:

Slightly off-topic: has anyone ever tried Epilame on clock bushes? The oil does tend to creep due to gravity and natural spreading.

I know a guy who does, he does really high end restoration and custom fabrication though. He uses an eye dropper to dose the bushings, probably uses more in Fixodrop value that what most normal clock services would cost!

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