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luiazazrambo

main spring got loose

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Hi *,

Now I understand how can the mainspring damage the movement. First hand experience because I made a mistake at the end of the cleaning and oiling process. 3 o'clock in the morning. I felt the teethes bouncing of my chest. Needless to say I was and I am still very sad.

Best regards,

Lui 

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If empathy is helpful, a torsion clock I spoke about a few weeks ago suffered badly bent teeth when the mainspring let go, at some stage in the past (well before I laid hands on it, I'm pleased to say). 

The pictures aren't brilliant but you can see the mashed up teeth between positions 6 & 7 o'clock on the wheel and at 8-ish o'clock on the barrel.

I straightened the barrel teeth out OK, managed to find a spare in place of the damaged wheel and (after sorting out former a repairer's 'adjustments' to the pallets and fitting the correct suspension spring) the clock's now fine.

750934002_Damagedteeth.thumb.jpg.f3e61cd3abca00d969fd26bd7b9f3af7.jpg  

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It is easy to forget quite how much energy is in a spring.

Even a tiny watch spring is capable of launching projectiles across the room, and mangling delicate components in the process. While letting down the spring on one of the Timexes I was looking at, I lost my grip and the entire watch literally flew past my ear on to the floor.

Fortunately no damage was done, I was expecting a snapped seconds pinion or a damaged balance.  I did have to do a bit of crawling about to recover a couple of parts however. 

The point is I guess, despite the fact that I was being particularly cautious I still managed to launch the thing in to orbit.

Clock springs are an order of magnitude more impressive when they get loose, so I would suggest always wearing eye protection when there is a chance of them escaping.

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On 3/13/2019 at 6:14 PM, 2131tom said:

If empathy is helpful, a torsion clock I spoke about a few weeks ago suffered badly bent teeth when the mainspring let go, at some stage in the past (well before I laid hands on it, I'm pleased to say). 

The pictures aren't brilliant but you can see the mashed up teeth between positions 6 & 7 o'clock on the wheel and at 8-ish o'clock on the barrel.

I straightened the barrel teeth out OK, managed to find a spare in place of the damaged wheel and (after sorting out former a repairer's 'adjustments' to the pallets and fitting the correct suspension spring) the clock's now fine.

  

Yes empathy is helpful i felt really miserable at that point 3 o'clock in the morning. :) Well done with the repair!

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On 3/13/2019 at 8:28 PM, JimmyD said:

Two rules I live with.

1) Allways let down the springs.

2) Never move the hands if any resistance is felt as it is a safe bet a tooth or teeth has been bent somewhere and you will only bend a few more.

This accident happened when I tried to test the clock at the end of the cleaning and re-assembly process. I try to always let the spring down before I start with a clock. (I only touched a few watches so far because I am a beginner.)

It was really painful because I was so proud that I fixed the broken mainspring (heated it up and created a hook and a lose end) then at the end of the process I ruined it. This is not a valuable clock but I just cannot stand this. :( :) 

Edited by luiazazrambo

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