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Harmines

Omega 1342 service/repair

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Good evening everyone. I am new to this forum and i can see we have some outstanding experts on the site.

brand new to watch repair and looking to get some advice. I purchased an Omega seamaster quarts 1342 watch (not currently working and not tested) as it was a bargain and understand that 329 is the equivalent of the original mercury battery used when the watch was manufactured?

I am hoping the battery change will mean it is functional but in the event it does not work, how easy/costly is it to repair. (I’ve heard parts can turn this bargain into a money pit)

would anyone in this community willing to have a go at fixing it after i try battery change?

paid service of course.

any help advice would be much appreciated

thank you 

 

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Hello, Harmines,

In the past, I have purchased several of the Omega 1342/3/5's and, from bitter experience, I can tell you that a major problem that occurs, is that the 'stepper motor' develops a fault. Commonly, open circuit. Broken bearing. Or, and I never did get to the bottom of this one................an ocillating (Back and forth) rotor.

In any event, the motor would need to be replaced and they are not available.

After waiting for nearly two years, I recently managed to get one from what was left of an Omega 1343.

I have found that the circuit board is very reliable and the biggest problem associated there, is when the battery terminal has been broken off and someone tries to resolder it back in place. During which process, the chip (IC) gets destroyed due to excessive heat.

In passing, I would mention that the 329 battery also requires an adapter ring fitted to it, in order to take up the extra space that the origional 338 would need.

These, too, can be a little difficult to find and, for what they are, are over priced!

Anyway, who knows, a battery change (You can test it without the adapter ring) may get your 1342 back into action. I certainly hope so........fingers crossed...............and good luck.

Len.

 

 

 

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Hi Len

thank you for the detailed reply. I tried a 329 today and unfortunately did not work. As you explained before it looks like the rotor is ocillating back and forth (the second hand moves forward and backwards). 

Its heartbreaking to see as i was hoping to fix it and give back to my grandfather.

is there anyway i can source the part or an alternative movement (does not have to be Omega) that will fit the dial and casing?Although not ideal as takes away from the integrity and beauty of the watch but would love to able to get it working one way or the other so my grandfather can wear it on the wrist again.

any help would be much appreciated 

regards

 

image.jpg

image.jpg

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Oh dear, such a shame. I was hoping that the new battery would have got your 1342 working. 

As for getting another stepper motor, the only thing I can say is to watch what is on offer on the web. If you are lucky enough, the seller would want a fortune for it.

You have to be very careful, because some sellers know that their stepper has gone and they word their ad' very carefully so as to  make it sound like you will be getting something for nothing................you won't!

There is  tissot watch that uses the same movement, but owners of that will be well aware of the spares situation and take financial advantage of it.

Put your 1342 in a plastic bag, wrap it up and wait (Patiently) to see what you can find.

By the way, the date on the watch should not be half way through changing at the time shown.

The hands are not aligned properly, because the hour hand would not be where it is at  12 minutes past the hour. 

If I could help you, I really would.

(I have been caught out in the past)

Len.

 

 

 

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Hi Harmines  A sorry story and a pity it looks a cool classic. If you fancy trying to replace the movement there are several pit falls like the dial feet positions etc  but 'am sure there must be a movement ot there that will fit but will require modification. As Len remarked at this point best put into storage pending further research.   all the best

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Hi Harmines    apparently  the fault you describe is due to the stepper motor being faulty the parts are hard to come by (1342-9400).completer movements seem expensive if you can get them but note that the Tissot  2044 movement is the same but again finding the parts or a donor may be a trial. I have enclosed some PDF's relating to the 1342 for your interest.

1342_complet_4216.pdf 1342_complet_2302.pdf Omega 1342 test.PDF

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