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    • By east3rn
      Hello. 
      I am about to work on a Omega ladies automatic watch.
      I found out that the axis of the rotor is out of place and shakes up and down.
      What could be done in this situation?
      Thanks!

    • By arkobugg
      Cheers mates!!
      Had to get new winding stem to an Omega cal. 342 , beacuse not original crown.
      Got an replacement from Ronda, but does not fit.
      Tried to fit the stem yesterday, but Im not able to get in in right in the movment.   The original just go right in every time, but the new Ronda stem will not go properly in.   Are there anyone that have some ide why this not fit?   Can the notch in the stem where I have put red arrow have somthing todo with this??   Its slightly smaller on the Ronda stem...  se photo  

    • By arkobugg
      Cheers Mates!
       
      Working on a Omega Cal. 613, have done service, and watch performs well on the time-grapher, but when put dial and hand on, I can see that the
       
       
       
       
    • By Harmines
      Hello all
      i wonder if anyone could offer some advice. I have an Omega seamaster 1345 quartz day date. Working well. However it seems the date is stuck (as shown in pictures) i know the push button at the 4 o clock position is meant to filter through the date? However when pushed in nothing seems to happen. As a result of this the watch works fine but only up untill 11pm it doesnt turn over to midnight and therefor change the day or date. Minute hand works perfectly but it seems i have to change the hour position every morning.
      when i turn the crown, hour hand moves fune and after the 12 o clock position changes the day, but date does not moth along with it.
      anyone know how i can resolve this safely without removing too many parts of the movement? 
      Many thanks




    • By Harmines
      Good evening everyone. I am new to this forum and i can see we have some outstanding experts on the site.
      brand new to watch repair and looking to get some advice. I purchased an Omega seamaster quarts 1342 watch (not currently working and not tested) as it was a bargain and understand that 329 is the equivalent of the original mercury battery used when the watch was manufactured?
      I am hoping the battery change will mean it is functional but in the event it does not work, how easy/costly is it to repair. (I’ve heard parts can turn this bargain into a money pit)
      would anyone in this community willing to have a go at fixing it after i try battery change?
      paid service of course.
      any help advice would be much appreciated
      thank you 
       
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    • Hello everyone, My name is John but you can call me Jack. I am new the group here and have been a hobbyist repairer for the past 2 + years. I mainly stick with mechanical watches but from time to time I will tinker with old quartz Seiko watches which I love. A current project that I have been trying to get down is a Seiko 4336 8129. This watch has been fighting me from the start. Well the movement was dead due to a broken pivot on the motor. So I sourced a replacement movement. Next Crystal was cracked so I removed the broken glass but can't figure out how to take the top bezel ring off. I have some pics. This poor watch has had a rough life. I was trying to bring it back!! Thank you for reading my tale of woe!!  
    • I am looking for a camera with a macro function to photograph my work.  I had a 18 or 20 megapixel Sony point and shoot that worked great for super close pics, but lost it in a fire.  Dont remember the model but it was a pocket sized camera I could zoom and focus on pallet stones with excellent definition.   It was less than $200 US.   Now I can’t find a camera that will do the job for less than $500  Any suggestions?
    • Can you repair my Timex Rally also? 
    • I have a small confession. I "fixed" it after that picture was taken, by carefully carving the notches back in to the brass with a sharp knife. It looks and winds a whole lot better, but yes, the real fix would be to replace the crown. The wear  to the crown and the plating suggests this is a well used watch, so the results of the service are all the more impressive. Edit: The crown carving was done by removing the crown and stem assembly and grabbing its shaft in my rechargeable drill's chuck, then cutting in to the surface with a sharp modeling knife blade. The original notches were barely visible, so some good light and a steady hand were needed. The result is vastly improved in terms of both looks and function, but a new crown would be the correct solution to the problem. 
    • yikes that crown is worn!
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