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Help pushing mainspring into barrel please, again


Lc130

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Hi All

If you've read my other posts you know I'm failing miserably with mainsprings.  Most of the issue is not having a winder (I'm looking).  I'm trying to push the spring from the donut directly  into the barrel.  The first time I did this it went effortlessly.  I've since had trouble.  This is a Seiko 6119A automatic.  I've previously failed by attempting even insertion pressure across the spring.  The bridle hung up and then the spring went airborne.  I can't hand wind it.  I've learned from members that the outermost wind needs to go in first.  My question is what to use to push it in.  I've tried peg wood on another but that results in wood debris.  I've tried a screwdriver but I'm afraid to damage it.  Any suggestions?  Is this even doable or is a winder needed?

Thank you

Charlie

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Press the ring down on a flat surface so the side of the spring that goes in first is sticking out at maximum. Place it in the barrel. Hold the ring down with your ring fingers, while pressing on the end of the bridle and also at the perimiter of the spring 180 degrees away. Getting the spring in the barrel, while in the ring, is 1st key, holding the ring down while pushing is second key.

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That did it.  Though, I made a slight mod to the procedure.  I placed the donut over the barrel and secured both to the bench by running strips of strong packing tape of the edges of the donut.

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1 hour ago, Lc130 said:

That did it.  Though, I made a slight mod to the procedure.  I placed the donut over the barrel and secured both to the bench by running strips of strong packing tape of the edges of the donut.

Good old creativity at work. Kudos to you.

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19 hours ago, Lc130 said:

That did it.  Though, I made a slight mod to the procedure.  I placed the donut over the barrel and secured both to the bench by running strips of strong packing tape of the edges of the donut.

Yes, figuring out ways to enlist the ever-absent, always needed,  third hand comes in very handy. I found 11th-15th fingers needed to get set-spring in place on a 7 3/4L Peseux. I placed my screw-drive movement holder, with movement in place, into my bench vise and it worked like a charm. The holder had nice squared sides that made it facilitate itself nicely to this purpose. Congrat's on getting that spring in with a little ingenuity. Cheers.

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