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2lostsouls

Timex with 24 watch movement

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Good afternoon everyone. I have finally taken apart my wife's grandfathers Timex watch, which has a 24 movement. I have several questions:

1. The stem is really sloppy, what can cause that?

2. What is the best way to clean this movement. I do not have a machine so it will be done manually.

3. Where can I get a crystal? Is there a place to buy them if I measure it? 

Thank you for all of your help. 

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Look up posts from Jersey Mo.  He's got some good step-by-step posts on servicing Timex.  The crystals for almost all vintage Timex watches are plastic high-dome (PHD).  You can find these many places, Esslinger for example.

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On ‎2‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 3:27 PM, 2lostsouls said:

Good afternoon everyone. I have finally taken apart my wife's grandfathers Timex watch, which has a 24 movement. I have several questions:

1. The stem is really sloppy, what can cause that?

2. What is the best way to clean this movement. I do not have a machine so it will be done manually.

3. Where can I get a crystal? Is there a place to buy them if I measure it? 

Thank you for all of your help. 

1. - sounds like a the o-ring just below the crown is missing.

2. - 3 step dunk and swish -15 minutes in ammonia - water rinse - blow dry - 15 minutes - lighter fluid - air dry -

but before you even go there check for damage such as pulled hairspring, grinding gears, hard to turn setting etc.

3. crystals - find me on ebay -

If I had to guess you are working on a 1966 Mercury with sweep. :)

 

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2 hours ago, AlamedaMike said:

Look up posts from Jersey Mo.  He's got some good step-by-step posts on servicing Timex.  The crystals for almost all vintage Timex watches are plastic high-dome (PHD).  You can find these many places, Esslinger for example.

not all are PHD -  

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