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majesus

fixing a flikflak watch strap

Question

Hi, my 4 year old daughter has a Swatch Flik Flak watch. She snagged it on something this afternoon and the strap is partially falling out as shown in the 1st photo.  How do I remove the strap pin? The strap pin looks a "dumbell" and one of the endspins while the other end does not.  It tried spinning it to see if it is threaded and screws out, it did not come apart. I also pulled and pried with a little force, nothing came undone.

 

I also search on google and youtube, but had no luck. Hopefully I can get some help here.

 

 

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Thanks,
Majesus

 

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These kind of watch strap bars are called 't-bars' and would normally be threaded allowing removal by a screwdriver.

For a mass produced watch like this - and perhaps even for safety reasons if it is a child's watch - I'm reckoning two parts are simply hydraulically pressed together at the factory and not intended to separated. This tight interference fit is also likely as it's noted this is not a normal strap (with lugs that a bar goes through) and is held in by the friction of the factory fitted bars.

Best bet is probably some epoxy glue to fix the strap in place temporarily and a new watch goes to the top of the birthday list. B)

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    • Ok then that settles that. Yeah I thought I saw it titled Horolovar 400 day clock repair so it stands to reason that it's probably the most informative.

      I was also looking on one of my favorite sites on the net: clockworks.com I'm not sure if you're familiar with it but it has a wonderful clock repair kit with a comprehensive e-book with a repair guide for cuckoo clocks, anniversary clocks, spring driven and weight driven clock repair. Also with that you get an oiler with oil, cleaning solution, visor, level, brass brush, hand/gear puller and a mainspring letdown key all for $69. Seems like a great deal for all that and I'm fairly certain is not all Chinese crap either.

      I need to get a staking set and anvil, a better hammer, decent screwdrivers, (also unsure as to what the best ones for clock repair are) bushings and the necessary tools to do that work, all at a smaller price point.

      I don't have the funds to shell out atm for everything I want. Also I'm only in the hobby phase for now. I am, more and more coming to truly enjoy working on clocks and watches and am considering doing this for a source of income. When you can turn a hobby into a job it's a win-win.

      Sent from my Z956 using Tapatalk

    • Terwillger's book is the one I had. That is the bible of anniversary clocks. 
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