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east3rn

need help on opening up this watch!

Question

Hello dear watchmakers. 

I am about to work on a Civis vintage watch from Germany.

The case of the watch looks like a typical watch case with a snap-off back.

However, the crown and stem won't come out of the case and what seems like an inner casing is actually part of the case.

Frustrated, I turned the watch over to find any opening on the bezel but it is also a part of the case.

How could I get the movement out of the case?? Any advice would be a great help. 

Thank you.

 

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Some times the case just consists of two parts the actual case and the glass. This style of watch uses something called two part stem which could be female or male. The stem has to gently be separated. 
Then you can use glass claws to remove the glass, or just apply a puff of air with a big plastic 150 ml syringe through the crown tube on the casing. Make sure it's airtight between the tube and syringe.
Once you removed the stem and glass the movement falls out.

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Hmm... wonder what's going on here? When I look at this thread on my Iphone there are indeed nice photos attached with the first post. But when I open the thread from my laptop they are not there.

Just wanted to mention that one of the photo's show the watch with the stem pulled out far enough to definitely have separated the two parts if this was indeed a split stem.

And the same photo show a brass ring between the movement and the casing. But it's not one of those flimsy movement holders that are quite common on some older watches but a more massive metal ring that I have seen in a few cases where the movement was significantly smaller than the casing. Can't remember if they were just pushed in or threaded into the casing to push down the dial and movement.

 

 

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3 hours ago, AndyHull said:

I think we need to see some good quality pictures of the watch in question before we can attempt to answer the question.

Hello. I think this is the best I can get. Photos look a bit dark...

KakaoTalk_20190102_202522006.jpg

KakaoTalk_20190102_202522777.jpg

KakaoTalk_20190102_202523434.jpg

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3 hours ago, HSL said:

Some times the case just consists of two parts the actual case and the glass. This style of watch uses something called two part stem which could be female or male. The stem has to gently be separated. 
Then you can use glass claws to remove the glass, or just apply a puff of air with a big plastic 150 ml syringe through the crown tube on the casing. Make sure it's airtight between the tube and syringe.
Once you removed the stem and glass the movement falls out.

 

2 hours ago, bsoderling said:

Hmm... wonder what's going on here? When I look at this thread on my Iphone there are indeed nice photos attached with the first post. But when I open the thread from my laptop they are not there.

Just wanted to mention that one of the photo's show the watch with the stem pulled out far enough to definitely have separated the two parts if this was indeed a split stem.

And the same photo show a brass ring between the movement and the casing. But it's not one of those flimsy movement holders that are quite common on some older watches but a more massive metal ring that I have seen in a few cases where the movement was significantly smaller than the casing. Can't remember if they were just pushed in or threaded into the casing to push down the dial and movement.

 

 

Well, I pulled out the stem and to my surprise, it is not split stem!

Also, I managed to pop out the glass and movement is removed from the case.

Now I am ready for disassembly of the movement. Thank you for your generous help!

KakaoTalk_20190102_204202994.jpg

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Just as a curiosities, this is how a case for a two stem usually looks like. One could think it's just like a snap-off but it isn't. It has a solid back.


 


 

Certina1.jpg

Certina2.jpg

Certina3.jpg

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