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jdrichard

Pivot Polisher Setup and Technique Help

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Just purchased this pivot polisher and was wondering if anyone has specific info on how to use it. I installed it on one of my lathes and trying to understand specifically the technique for finishing balance staff pivots: if that is possible.4ce3e13849e953c634572a8b81a63951.jpg80ec1e2b01575d82d24580cb49d1a325.jpg726b1c61c74723ba1e685701960d6813.jpg

 

 

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Archie Perkins' book on lathes and Marvin Whitney's book on marine chronometers give quite detailed descriptions of the use of these tools, the Levin book has some good info too. They are what a regular machinist would call a grinding attachment. They can produce excellent results, but the preparation of the laps and setup of the tooling is very time consuming. If you're looking for an easy way to finish balance pivots you're better off getting your basic turning on point and finishing in a jacot tool. If you want to avoid the jacot then wig wag tools (Perkins and Levin go into detail on them) are a much faster solution.

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Archie Perkins' book on lathes and Marvin Whitney's book on marine chronometers give quite detailed descriptions of the use of these tools, the Levin book has some good info too. They are what a regular machinist would call a grinding attachment. They can produce excellent results, but the preparation of the laps and setup of the tooling is very time consuming. If you're looking for an easy way to finish balance pivots you're better off getting your basic turning on point and finishing in a jacot tool. If you want to avoid the jacot then wig wag tools (Perkins and Levin go into detail on them) are a much faster solution.

Thanks. Just thought I would try this one out, plus, it's a tool:)

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Archie Perkins' book on lathes and Marvin Whitney's book on marine chronometers give quite detailed descriptions of the use of these tools, the Levin book has some good info too. They are what a regular machinist would call a grinding attachment. They can produce excellent results, but the preparation of the laps and setup of the tooling is very time consuming. If you're looking for an easy way to finish balance pivots you're better off getting your basic turning on point and finishing in a jacot tool. If you want to avoid the jacot then wig wag tools (Perkins and Levin go into detail on them) are a much faster solution.

Is wig wag tools a book and how do I get it?

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A wig wag is a tool for polishing pivots or other arbor diameters, it's used from under the work, and one side is supported by the tailstock and the other is on the work. Fried refers to them briefly in his Watch Repairer's Manual but he calls them "polishing shovels". The image is from the Levin book Practical Benchwork for Horologists. The support part in the tailstock is eccentric and by changing its position you can vary the angle of the part of the wig wag in contact with the work. Some tailstock supports have a roller, some are very simple and solid. The wig way itself can be dressed to make straight shouldered or conical pivots, and a basic rounded edge can produce a number of different conical shapes by angling the tool in use.

 

wig wag.jpg

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A wig wag is a tool for polishing pivots or other arbor diameters, it's used from under the work, and one side is supported by the tailstock and the other is on the work. Fried refers to them briefly in his Watch Repairer's Manual but he calls them "polishing shovels". The image is from the Levin book Practical Benchwork for Horologists. The support part in the tailstock is eccentric and by changing its position you can vary the angle of the part of the wig wag in contact with the work. Some tailstock supports have a roller, some are very simple and solid. The wig way itself can be dressed to make straight shouldered or conical pivots, and a basic rounded edge can produce a number of different conical shapes by angling the tool in use.
 
838972470_wigwag.thumb.jpg.5dcac5c2ad9e39b9cf8cfee3af944fab.jpg

Ah, thanks. I have seen write up on these in the past and ignored them


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So I set up the pivot polisher and have a question. The cord that came with it, when tied together in a knot, the knot will not go around the lower pulley wheel. Is there a better way of knotting the cord so it does not get jammed when traversing the lower pulley?492c375fa59d728ee942c848c8395ab3.jpg


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