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    • By Calvin
      Hello guys..
      I wanna ask..
      How to adjust my eta valjoux 7750 movement to be faster..
      Cause it slow 2-3 minute a day..
      Do i just need to move this part to the (+) sign?? Thankyouu

    • By Giuseppe
      Hi,
      in order to buy appropriate spares in my attempt to service an Omega 175.0083 (7750)  I need some advice:
      1.
      I've already been suggested to replace MS:
      Barrel is Ok and I'm thinking of buying a new MS and moebius 8217 for barrel lubricating as I don't want to spend money on recommended Kluber 125 grease.
      Should I consider instead buying a barrel complete (assuming Barrel complete (180.1) comes with MS installed) wich supposedly comes prelubricated ?
      2.
      Attached image shows automatic device bridge with evident sign of wear from where, to my understanding, the problem orginated: a screw came off
      I cant find original part. 
      ETA part is different from Omega in that the Omega is larger and partially covers hammer two function and the chronograph cam.
      Beside that and since the watch has no crystal back case I think those parts are perfectly interchangeable.
      Do I need to replace the bridge or are there alternative aproaches to this problem?
      TIA
      Giuseppe


    • By perfectkyo
      A new 7750 movement, cleaning and assembly again, why watch swing only 260 °?
    • By matabog
      Hello!
      I am servicing my first 7750 (thank you Mark for the YT videos and Lawson for the Disassembly/Assembly walk-through).
      The movement is not new - let's say it has an obscure unknown history  It appears to be a genuine swiss 7750, but with a lower grade finish (very low...)
      When putting back the balance stones I noticed that there were two sizes (two pairs, because the cap stones fit the hole jewel settings). I put the smaller stone and hole-jewel on the mainplate and the larger ones on the balance cock. I tried to but the larger setting on the mainplate but it didn't fit quite right. I believe the springs are the same size - its just the stones that differ a bit (aprox 0.1mm) 
       
      So my question is: did any of you stumbled upon the same issue? Is it normal for a 7750 to have two different stone sizes?
      Thank you!
      Bogdan
    • By johnbiggs
      Hey, guys, I have a 7750 movement where the rotor screw snapped off. I opened it up and it appears the rest of the screw is still inside the rotor post. Is there anything I can do to screw it back out?
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    • I own a very similar Lip Nautic ski in very good condition that recently stopped working. Where can I purchase a new R184 movement or get it serviced in US? thx Azat
    • Quote from Bob Tascione “I use Mobile 1 synthetic 5-30 on all my watchmakers lathe as well as on my Hardinge 7 inch bench lathe. Works well for me and easy to find.” Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    • hope it helps.  As it seems you are UK based, you also might inquire about a local model engineering club.  Most of what I saw in the video was fairly generic stuff and may appeal to various hobbies centre around machining other than horology (and many model engineers also build clocks).  The UK is the centre for model engineering, you might find that including that fraternity greatly increases the target market size
    • It seems an odd choice, but it may not do harm.  imo there is no reason to use a multiweight oil,  but maybe there are good reasons I missed.  I also don't see a reason to use a synthetic oil, won't hurt, but they are more money.  Regular oils don't break down until 270F - there's some serious issues if that's a factor with a lathe .  It seems a topic full of hyperbole and little expertise; there's one horology oil report claiming synthetic oils don't contain hydrocarbons!   What nonsense..  Multiweight oil are designed for internal combustion engines where there's a big temperature swing.  The low initial viscosity helps get oil pressure built up quickly and makes cold cranking easier.  But the engine quickly gets up 220F or so and the oil operates at its high viscosity (oil viscosity is determined at a set temp, i.e. an oil of X viscosity means its X at 40C, it will have a very different viscosity at 110C).  Your lathe just doesn't go through the same temp swings, say -40 to +220 n the dead of winter so I don't see how a multigrade makes any sense....except maybe because is readily available? In general with machines, motor oil is really frowned on because of the additives and detergents.  They're are needed do deal with combustion, but not wanted in a gearbox/bearing bath.  Watchmakers lathes are a total loss system so these objections I don't think matter much, but its worth mentioning in the context of machine tools and oils. With a 0W20 run a low temps, you're really only going to see the "0".   The zero isn't really zero, its just small, maybe the equivalent to ISO 3 or maybe 4. ( 0 Viscosity is superfluidity, liquid helium laboratory stuff).  So what really matters?  That its a clean mineral oil (i.e. hydraulic oil) and of the right viscosity (singular) So that's the real concern I had, Is ISO 3 or 4 enough?   I'd have guessed no, but maybe.   Most of these lathes don't come with a viscosity recommendation.  Clock oils often recommended are afaik much higher than 3-4 but (snake?) oil marketing, while full of lofty claims, rarely even states the viscosity!   .  I suppose it can be overthought, these lathes seem to easily last 100 years with whatever is put into them,.  So long as the oil is thick enough to keep the parts separate at speed, its thick enough.  Still, i think synthetic and multigrade oils in a plan bearing are, well, just not required.  
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