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Is the second/minute chronograph hand always supposed to be ticking?

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Hi guys, 

I bought a chronograph watch recently. I didn't want the chronograph function but it happened to come with it (Timex Fairfielder). Is the second/minute hand chronograph supposed to be moving all the time? 

 

Thanks!

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The second hand in the subdial at 6 runs all the time. It is the real second hand. It and the hour and minute hand keep time. The center second hand is only for the chronograph and is otherwise stationary and at 12 during normal operation. When the top right button is pushed, that one should start ticking off the seconds, the one at 3 o’clock will remain still, and the one at 9 o’clock will register each minute that passes. When you hit the top button again, the center second hand will stop moving, the one at 3 will jump to show the 20th of a second that you hit the button. Together, the three chrono hands will tell you the seconds, 20th of a second and minutes that it ran. Then when you hit the bottom button, all three will reset to 12. The 3 hands that tell the time are independent of the 3 for the chronograph. Hope this helps. Steve


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Did you purchase the watch new? Timex has user manuals on their website. Usually on the chronographs one button starts and stops and the other button returns the hands to zero.  So if you push the top right-hand button do the  chronograph hands stop moving? Otherwise if it's not working on somebody's recently change the battery it might still be in some setting mode so you'll have to go through the setting procedure to get everything reset.

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No it is not supposed to run all the time. I looked up your watch, and it looks like it is a quartz chronograph. If the sweep hand is ticking, then the chronograph function is running and the top pusher needs to be pushed in to stop it and the bottom pushers resets to zero. The smaller hands are indeed supposed to tick off the seconds if the chronograph function is not engaged. That's the norm for most chronographs.

 

Joe

Edited by noirrac1j

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Yes, it just sits at the top. Think of it as a watch and a stopwatch. The stopwatch is normally idle.

Just as an FYI - there are a few chronos out there that reverse the two second hands so it looks more normal, but having a tiny chrono secondhand makes it hard to read accurately. The vast majority are like yours. Steve


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Hi, thanks for all the responses. Was asleep. 

This is the watch I have. This is the manual. When I press the top button. The 1/20 second hand (2 o clock dial)  moves and the main second hand stops moving. When I press it again, the main second hand continues ticking. However, the bottom dial (chronograph second hand) continues to tick regardless. And after every minute, the 10 o clock (minute chronograph hand) ticks. I've tried like 10 different combinations but nothing stops the bottom dial from ticking.I can get to a point where I can move the 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock dial, but there's nothing I can do to touch the bottom dial. If I pull the crown out to C position, it works as it should - with nothing but the main hands moving. But I don't want to leave it out at that position.

I spent an hour tinkering with it and then gave up and decided to make a post here.

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