Jump to content
jdrichard

Made a Full “How To Make A Balance Staff” Movie

Recommended Posts

I would think you will have to anneal the old pivot.Although when searching on the net know-one seems to do this. 

A book I have suggests that you need to anneal it as well but recommends not to if it can be avoided. As well, the part is so small and the pivot is in the pinion side so very hard to heat. And the new balance was working so well.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a little off topic but here goes I went to machinist school, and I used to think that you blasted a drill bit through steel with high speed, in actuality old drill bits were hand cranked so HIGH SPEED could mean anything above that, now I use the slowest rate I can to drill, 50to 100 rpm,  and I use a mixture of olive oil and dawn dish detergent in a little water, shake it up  each time!!  it work especially well on stainless steel, rate of feed is force, to the object, so if you feed hard or press hard you are heating the bit NOT allowing it to cut but wearing away the sharpened bit, I cant take a COBALT it and put it to stainless with no lube press to hard and it will sit there and spin,  ADD the goo, spin slowly with lighter pressure and you will see curls of stainless coming off the bit.. cobalt its are much larger here in the USA, not for watchmaking, I have only found just steel bits, but the principal applies, I did 3 pivots on and old LaPhare  Moonphase pocket watch  I used 2 bits , the first one I have an involuntary jerk from time to time and that occurred breaking the first one, chucked up another one and hand pushed it against the staff so I could Feel the pressure , and it went in, and YES you may have to anneal if you know all this I apologize not trying to tell you what to do, just my experience

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
a little off topic but here goes I went to machinist school, and I used to think that you blasted a drill bit through steel with high speed, in actuality old drill bits were hand cranked so HIGH SPEED could mean anything above that, now I use the slowest rate I can to drill, 50to 100 rpm,  and I use a mixture of olive oil and dawn dish detergent in a little water, shake it up  each time!!  it work especially well on stainless steel, rate of feed is force, to the object, so if you feed hard or press hard you are heating the bit NOT allowing it to cut but wearing away the sharpened bit, I cant take a COBALT it and put it to stainless with no lube press to hard and it will sit there and spin,  ADD the goo, spin slowly with lighter pressure and you will see curls of stainless coming off the bit.. cobalt its are much larger here in the USA, not for watchmaking, I have only found just steel bits, but the principal applies, I did 3 pivots on and old LaPhare  Moonphase pocket watch  I used 2 bits , the first one I have an involuntary jerk from time to time and that occurred breaking the first one, chucked up another one and hand pushed it against the staff so I could Feel the pressure , and it went in, and YES you may have to anneal if you know all this I apologize not trying to tell you what to do, just my experience
 

Really appreciate the help. Not sure how to anneal when the pivot is so close to the wheel and leaf gear, pinion.

Sent from my GT-N5110 using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread is fast becoming a favourite! Hopefully next you’ll break a wheel and have to re-machine one from scratch, or find a broken jewel as could do with learning that too!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can recommend carbide drills from eternal tools. See my second to last video on YT, repairing a broken pivot. and you will see They cut through like butter.
 

 
Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
 
 
 
 

Thanks Mark. Btw I bought your training session on watch repair and am going thru all the training now. I am picking up tips on diagnostics hear and there, appreciated. I will check out the carbide bits.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This thread is fast becoming a favourite! Hopefully next you’ll break a wheel and have to re-machine one from scratch, or find a broken jewel as could do with learning that too!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I made a jewel replacement video on YouTube a while back. jdrichard01


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can recommend carbide drills from eternal tools. See my second to last video on YT, repairing a broken pivot. and you will see They cut through like butter.
 

 
Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk
 
 
 
 

Mark, these are on eBay. Have you used these in the past.5dffe6989d2ef1d5408d52faa9781398.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, jdrichard said:


Mark, these are on eBay. Have you used these in the past.5dffe6989d2ef1d5408d52faa9781398.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

I have purchased some from eBay and I found them crap. I then purchased some from Eternal tools and the difference was remarkable. I also have purchased some larger drill bits from Axminster tools which were also very good. As the old saying goes "you gets what you pay for". 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Axminster is where I went to school and in the town I served my apprenticeship. I can remember when Axminster Power Tools first started. Now they ship all over the world. They supply the UK army with engineering equipment such as lathes and power tools. The chap that started it all up is now in a home in Seaton poor old boy, such a nice person too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have purchased some from eBay and I found them crap. I then purchased some from Eternal tools and the difference was remarkable. I also have purchased some larger drill bits from Axminster tools which were also very good. As the old saying goes "you gets what you pay for". 
 

I think you are right and I may need to pay the high price for a single drill bit. The price of the drill bit is almost the same price of a new part.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • If the clock has a lack of oil say the platform, you will find it will not preform, as it should do no matter what you do. It is such a delicate and vital part it has to be in tiptop condition for it to work correctly, 
    • Caliber is generally engraved next to the ballance wheel.
    • You said it gains about a minute every 24 hours, I see the beat adjustment lever (the one that is bent downward over the back plate) is pushed to one side, this lever will advance or retract the beat therefore speeding the clock up or slowing it down. Also check to see if the balance spring is free in the slot of this lever if not it may be putting too much tension on the spring. Just so you know, the closer the slot end of the lever is to the end of the spring (where the taper pin holds it) the slower the clock will run.
    • It's very difficult to provide help without pictures. From the information you've provided, I can tell you that Omega pocket watch with movement number 5,694,216 would have been made between 1916 and 1923. The 15 jewels and 2 adjustments would align with these dates as well. I do not know what "Fortune" or the other number mean. Here is a picture of a watch made in the same time period...does your movement look like this?
    • Hi Andy,  The link introduces/defines Thermodynamic which is the study of heat energy conversion to work and vice versa. It is about transformation of energy. One form of energy (heat) transforming into another form ( work) and not concerned with transfer of heat, from hot to cold. Understanding the nature of heat and the mechanism heat transfers from hot source to cold, is a key len33 is prepared to use. His question shows him ready to absorb the concept. Regards joe  
×