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phydaux

Wanted - Tips for using an ultrasonic cleaning machine

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On 11/10/2018 at 4:17 PM, AndyHull said:

Bergeon 2552 One Dip appears to contain 99% tetrachlorethane...  Back in the distant past, we used to use it a lot of that in the workshop to clean printer parts and other computer bits.

Was that the stuff where, if you got one drop of it on your clothes or on the carpet, then it would just stink FOREVER?  As in to make the stink go away you had to just take out a knife and cut a square out of the carpet where the drop fell?  Or just throw your jacket away because it would never stop smelling like chemicals?

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One time I was cleaning a customer's ink jet printer and I asked my boss for some alcohol to clean it with.  He handed me some foaming spray cleaner in a can, said to use that.  I sprayed it on the plastic printer parts, and watched in horror as the plastic melted before my eyes.

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3 minutes ago, phydaux said:

Was that the stuff where, if you got one drop of it on your clothes or on the carpet, then it would just stink FOREVER?  As in to make the stink go away you had to just take out a knife and cut a square out of the carpet where the drop fell?  Or just throw your jacket away because it would never stop smelling like chemicals?

Not that I remember, no. It was far too volatile for that.

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On 11/7/2018 at 5:06 PM, phydaux said:

Thanks clockboy.   So 40 hz of action, and preferably more than one transducer.   

Do you put small parts directly into the ultrasonic cleaner, or do you put them inside something?

40Khz.

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On 11/8/2018 at 2:03 AM, clockboy said:

Perhaps you are being a bit pedantic. The ultrasonic machine I was referring too was the Elma "P' Line (Industrial use) Multi-Frequency & digital. Starting price £775. 

Hi, will you disclose the frequencies your ultrasonic  machine produces. That would give an idea what range to shop for. Many thanks.

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I can't think of a chemical reaction that would take place between the chrome (or other metal plating) and the solvent directly, but any lacquers, varnishes or other protective finishes may well be affected.

Also it occurs to me that when it evaporates, the solvent may leave behind a residue of less volatile "stuff" that was dissolved and then re-deposited after the solvent has flashed off. In other words, you may have varnished the metal with some random dissolved dirt. See if the pale marks rub off.

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59 minutes ago, AndyHull said:

I can't think of a chemical reaction that would take place between the chrome (or other metal plating) and the solvent directly, but any lacquers, varnishes or other protective finishes may well be affected.

Also it occurs to me that when it evaporates, the solvent may leave behind a residue of less volatile "stuff" that was dissolved and then re-deposited after the solvent has flashed off. In other words, you may have varnished the metal with some random dissolved dirt. See if the pale marks rub off

For watch repair, The solvent penetration through the pores of plating and reaction with the basemetal underneath, is the issue of concren. This effect often gets visibly evident upon long time exposures day/ weeks. I think long terms effect of short term exppsure can safely be dismissed. Ligher fluid has so far ( twenty seven days exposure) shown inert. 

 

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i use an ultrasonic not the best but does the job. i know a lot of watchmakers who dont even use ultrasonic, they use pthwood, pegwood, watch paper brushes etc. but i use both methods if you dont have the greatest ultrasonic then you should not use it as your only source of cleaning....What i do is this. i have 2 jars one for first clean and one for second clean. these are small glass jars big enough just to fit a movement. I put lighter fluid in each jar and i also fill the ultrasonic with enough water to be slightly higher then the lighter fluid level in the jar. this will not let the glass break. i take apart movement and place them in jar #1 clean then repeat for jar #2. when they are out i dry them with a puffer or dust off can. lighter fluid evaporates very quickly so no need for hair dryer. i ream all pivot holes with pegwood then follow through with a round pivot broach (do not use this method for jewels since it could case them to crack) i rub all parts with watch paper and i brush all the wheels and spindles. I also push and twist all pivots in pithwood. i oil the movement then reassemble, then i add a bit more oil on top of the pivot/jewel holes with pivot seated. 

and as far as balance assembly i do not use the ultrasonic - i use one dip. then i polish the pivots using a burnisher, i also polish the pivots of the escape wheel too.

i use to use L&R but i dont like the fumes plus the cost. lighter fluid is basically naphtha and has been used for years to clean watches, plus its cheap and readily available at pretty much any store. it evaporates with no residue and does not require an alcohol rinse although its not bad if you do. i use it in small jars so there is no waste i get about 2-3 cleaning before i change the fluid. if you use it too much then you could get some residue on the movement.

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