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    • By berniethebolt
      hi all.presently working on a AS 1171 of which there seems to little info e.g part nos etc.i seem to have had a accident with one of the train wheels.(please see pics)still new to this hobby so sometimes struggle to identify certain parts unless i have a makers chart in front of me.can anybody help with this and have any chance of finding a part without having to source a whole movement (there are some on e-bay) which would not make economic sense?B.




    • By Mickeycz
      Hello,
       
      I'm new here and into watch/horology world as well. I recently tried to replace the dial on my 7750 watch.
      1) Open the wathc case
      2) removed rotor
      3) removed stem (gentle push of remove stem pusher and pull the stem out)
      4) removed the movement from the case
      5) put movment to movement holder
      6) removed hands
      7) removed dial
      8) put new dial
      9) pressed the hands back, hovewer during setting it up I realized the movement is not running - even when I wind it up - it is solid/stable and not ticking at all.. 
      Kind of out of ideas what can went wrong, the movement was functional correctly before..
       
      Thank you for any ideas.
      Mickey
       
    • By sunday
      Hello, I'm building a watch using a Sellita SW200 and I bought an ETA 2824 dial.  The dial has four feet and so does my movement, but they don't line up, the ones on the dial are too far apart relative to the movement.  I think if I cut off two feet I can make it fit but I'm not 100% sure.
      Is this a common scenario?
    • By AdamC
      Hello,
      I know this is a long shot but would anyone happen to have the technical sheet for the ETA 1164. I acquired this little beauty on ebay; a non-runner from the USA, which needs a lot of TLC. I've never tackled anything quite like this one but fancied the challenge. However, I'm not 100% sure yet whether the everything on the bottom plate under the dial is complete - can anyone confirm? The top plate however looks fine. The watch back is stamped "Seeland Watch Co. Swiss" - having looked it up, it appears Frederick Seeland was once CEO for IWC! Nice historical timepiece once I've restored it. I've added a few photos for reference (yes, I've removed the balance ).
      Thanks in advance.



    • By AdamC
      Hello,
      It's been a while since I've posted but I have an issue that's perplexed me! About ten months ago, I repaired and serviced a rare ETA 2832 movement with a day date calendar mechanism. The watch worked fine until recently when the day wheel advanced half way and then got stuck. Having had it back on the bench and done a partial strip-down, I have re-engaged the day wheel, which now turns freely through all days in the crown/stem corrector position (as does the date wheel when turning in the opposite direction) but when moving the hands forward through 24 hours, the date wheel advances but the day wheel will not. I have carefully examined the day jumper mechanism and note that as the calendar wheel rotates and the arm engages the teeth and rotates the date wheel, nothing seems to be engaging to move the day wheel forward. I have added a few photos which may help to identify the problem. I have annotated with a red arrow, the lever which I think is supposed to advance the day wheel but doesn't engage at the calendar wheel teeth (if indeed this is what it's supposed to do). Any ideas of what I may have missed here?
      Thanks



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    • Isn't the impulse jewel common to both movements? Since the "C" has a jewelled barrel arbor hole which isn't jewelled on the "B", in order for the jewel count to be correct for both movements the "B" must have a jewelled bearing that is not jewelled on the "C". It would be interesting to see what aspect of the "C" was improved by removing a jewel, even if it just turns out to be the cost of manufacture.
    • Awww. Mine are definitely much better JDR. . To be honest I don’t know, but that’s certainly an enviable display of screwdrivers. The grips aside, the main improvement I found was the precision ground stainless steel blade. Nice display box! Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    • Isopropanol will soften and wash away the shellac. Take care with the balance and pallet fork. Just a quick dip of a few seconds, then straight onto watch paper to take off the excess, then use a puffer to dry the critical areas where the shellac bonds on the jewels. After 4 years using lighter fluid and thinking I was getting parts clean, I now use Elma watch cleaning product. Amazing how I fooled myself about how clean was clean. Also, try an ultrasonic which are very cheap nowadays. In general, IPA (isopropyl alcohol)is not a good cleaner, but is good for the final fine rinse if done quickly. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    • In order to properly service the movement you absolutely should remove the wheel so that you can clean any contaminated or degraded oil away (which if left could very easily result in premature wear and failure even if the side shake is acceptable now) and relubricate with fresh oil.  A dedicated 5 spoke wheel puller is the best way to go as it pulls at the hub, eliminating the risk of deforming the wheel, but not the only way. The important thing is to pull the wheel straight up with no twisting or canting of the wheel since the arbor is brittle and will snap sooner than bend. This can be achieved using two thin blades worked under the wheel from opposite sides to gradually wedge the wheel up. You may need to protect the bridge with some paper or tape to prevent scratches, and you need to use blades that are only very slightly thicker than the gap between the wheel and the bridge because you need to progress slowly, and don't be tempted to twist the blades. As long as the force is straight up in line with the arbor, and gradual enough to not deform the wheel, you should be alright. 
    • Discharge barrel power, then feel the side shake on the wheel( independently driven minute wheel), if no excessive side shake or other faults, just leave the wheel where it is, do not remove it.       
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