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Found 21 results

  1. Hi I have recently gotten interested to learn and acquire knowledge about watches and there movements. I have a question for the initiated,if there is rust in the parts of the watch must the patts be replaced or can they be cleaned with a rust removal process or is that not advisable due to the parts being very fragile in nature. Thanks again for youre time.
  2. Hi, I am new to watch repair and have mainly been servicing simple eta movements for my own I have always wanted a chronograph watch and have found a watch based on a valjoux 7750 with a broken case. I want to put the movement into a new case but the dial is a day date and the movement is date only. I have sourced all the parts and have fitted them to the movement to add the day function. The donor watch didn't use a dial washer / foil, do I need to use one now I have added the day indicator? If I do need a foil, what size and where from? Thanks very much Stuart
  3. First part of the disassembly, fixing and reassembly of my new Seiko 7T32-7C20 Flightmaster Chronograph that recently bought as defect. The damage was caused by trying to manually setting the date at around 11:30PM, when the watch usually starts to change the date automatically. Enjoy the first part of the video.
  4. Hello and greetings to all!, I have 2 "tools" perhaps. I don't see a spot for it on my staking tool. Let me back up as well. I have introduced myself on Watch Repair Talk. I said I am a fledgling watch repairer.However, I am more like still in the egg. I have fixed quite a few watches and destroyed even more. Its ok though, I get a box of watches and practice. One time I even got a great deal on a box of watches price wise and it contained 2 working Suunto watches and even a couple of watches that were solid gold. You have to admire and love young adults that sell granddads watches on eBay for pocket money without a clue what they are selling. If people spend a few bucks to have it appraised it would knock their socks off at what the watch is really worth. Sorry I am babbling . If anyone kind enough that knows what these "Tools?" are I would be grateful and possible name my next child after you. The one thing you can not see from the picture is some or most of the hole are tapered. Thank-You Matt H. Clearwater, Florida
  5. Hello there. I am just starting in this hobby of watch repair and after changing some batteries and fixed hands, have bought two books: Beginner Watch Making by Tim Swike which was very helpful to me and Watch Repairing as a Hobby by D.W. Fletcher which I just can't connect too, I guess in terms of writing style and the way he refers to illustrations which are unclear at a time. My question is ther any book that you will recommend for a real beginner about quartz and manual watch repairing. Many thanks for your advice.
  6. I got this Seiko 6139-6002 for pennies on the dollar albeit it was not working, in poor physical condition and with missing and damaged parts. I used after-market parts to “restore” this watch to a portion of its lost glory. This will go down as one of my favorite repair and restoration projects.
  7. I have a Rotary watch GB42826/08 but having trouble removing the back. It seems to be a snap on but won't budge? Do I have to remove the crown first if so how. Thanking you in advance.
  8. This survey is about the use of your staking tools and should take you no more than 5 minutes, the link is posted below. This interview is being conducted for my university engineering design course so any input you supply would be greatly appreciated. https://goo.gl/forms/zFa3XYt19rYp8wX63 If you wish to provide more info, especially related to what you like about your staking tool and what you would like to change about it, please comment below. Thank you for your time and participation in our survey.
  9. Good day, guys! This is my little way of giving back to this wonderful community. We usually receive for repair a watch handed down by a father to his son. In this case, its a watch given by the son to his father - a Seiko 5 from the early 1990s. The watch has seen better days, with its hardilex crystal beaten and the watch not moving at all regardless of the amount of shaking you give it. The hands are corroded and the dial mounted on the movement using contact cement. I'll skip the disassembly and show you how the Seiko 7009 movement works. The Seiko 7009 technical guide is easy to find on the net though. First to be mounted is the center wheel that drives the cannon pinion. After which I install the escape wheel and the center wheel bridge. The third wheel and fourth wheel is installed next. Note that the fourth wheel drives the second hand directly. Then the click comes next. Prior to installing the unified barrel and train-wheel bridge, you have to install the pawl lever and first reduction wheel assembly. The assembly is held in place by the first reduction wheel holder. Take note of the orientation of the pawl lever. I find it difficult to install the barrel and train wheel bridge while ensuring that the click spring doesn't get in the way. <end of part 1>
  10. I have been working hard on developing a video manager on the Watch Repair Talk community website which will allow users to pause and resume, and go back to where they left off even days later. The videos are uploaded in a higher bit rate and resolution than the videos I upload to YouTube. Obviously this is a great feature especially for the longer videos. Speaking of longer videos.. on YouTube, I tend to break them up into several parts and upload them as episodes. You will notice that with the premium videos they are not split. Going forward, new videos will be uploaded to the Premium Video section before they go up on YouTube, and I will be posting some exclusive clips there too. And as a Patron, you will always have full unrestricted access otherwise there is a 10 minute per day limitation. Please take a look and please let me know if you encounter any problems. http://www.watchrepairtalk.com/patrons/patrons-videos-index.html/
  11. I'm a beginner when it comes to watches, but I'm just about ready to try to service my first watch. I've been gathering tools and just got a Little Giant C. E. Marshall cleaning machine. Can you all recommend resources for watch parts and supplies in the US? Specifically watch parts. I was also wondering about jewel settings. Do you remove all jewel setting when cleaning a watch with setting? How do you keep them organized so they don't get mixed up while cleaning? Maybe there are some threads that already have this info...if so, I missed them. Thanks for your help!
  12. (sunny it is, even in February, though its a bit chilly this AM, just under 0 centigrade...) Hi, I am Tom, and I live in South Carolina, USA, and after years of dabbling about with watches, the bug has finally bit in earnest. By background, I have been many things...I worked in the printing industry to start with, then went back and got degrees in business education, then I taught US History at the high school level for a few years, and have worked mostly as an IT person since then. Now, I run my own little IT consulting business and do work mostly for private non-profit organizations here in the state capitol, Columbia. Interspersed with all of that, I also worked as a licensed gunsmith specializing in centerfire long range target rifles and was a competitive shooter, and became a pretty fair machinist, doing a lot of custom barrel and chambering work. I will probably be cranking that operation back up fairly soon... The watch thing started with two watches I inherited from my uncle via my father...the first was his Bulova A-11 that was issued to him back in World War 2, when he flew B-17s out of England. I got this one perhaps 25 years ago and had it professionally serviced at the time. I will probably go into it for another service sometimes soon when I get better at this stuff. Then, just this year, from my fathers estate I received my uncles 1940s vintage Longens, a simply beautiful old watch. I also have my father's Bulova Accutron Railroad Approved (he was a railroad man for 36 years) that is due for a major overhaul...alas, his Hamilton 992B was stolen by a disreputable coworker on the job, which lead to his buying the Accutron in the early '70s... So, now I want to learn to work on these things, and being fairly methodical about this sort of operation, decided to standardise on just a few movements at first, ones that I can get plenty of cheap parts and donors to go with. Owning and liking several of the Vostok Amphibias and Kommanderskes, and spying that I can get a seemingly limitless supply of parts and scrap movements out of Russia and the Ukraine on eBay, I bought up a basic set of tools, some fifty 2409, 2416, 2209 and 2214 movements out of Kiev for about $1.50 each, and started buying up Vostok watches in various states of disrepair to match. I am not much of a watchmaker at this point, but I am having fun! Thanks; -Tom
  13. Tissot 2403 Service Walkthrough What is it with me and small movements?! I seem to attract them in absurd numbers. Oh well, here's another one to push my Zeiss optics to the limit, a Tissot 2403. My brother's father-in-law found this at the local rubbish tip, thrown away and unloved :( Upon initial inspection the condition looked dirty but not marked up, Canon Pinion felt good when setting the hands, and it seemed to wind smoothly. But alas it wasn't running at all. So to the bench I go, and de-case this little gem of a find. It removes like many ladies fashion watches, with the movement cradled in the Caseback. I removed it from the Caseback, and it looked remarkably clean. So I gave it a close inspection to see if there was something obvious that was stopping the movement. First thing that stood out, and is common on these types of movements, is the lack of a Crown Seal. As you can see there is a lot of contamination along the Stem, including nylon fibres ... perhaps from the sleeve of a sweater. I continued to look and found more of these fibres near the Balance. Continuing my inspection it was obvious that this watch was in desperate need of a complete service. Note the condition of the jewels. But besides a strip and clean, I couldn't see anything else wrong with it. No rust, nothing bent or broken; just some contamination stopping it from running. It's sad to see we live in such a throw away society today, 50 or 60 years ago this would have never been discarded on a tip. Ok, time to bring this watch back to life. First step as always, release the tension from the Mainspring, and remove the Balance and Pallets. Now the Balance and Pallet Fork safe, we can remove the Keyless Work. Start by removing the Hour Wheel, then the Setting Lever Spring. Then remove the Yoke and Setting Lever. Be sure to secure the Yoke Spring with Pegwood and note is orientation. Then remove the Minute Wheel and Setting Wheel. Then pull the Stem, and remove the Sliding Pinion and Winding Pinion. Flip it over and remove the Ratchet Wheel and Crown Wheel. Then you can remove the Mainspring and Train Bridges. As you can see, even if this watch was running, it would have not been giving accurate time. All the jewel holes are filthy! Here is a reference shot of the train on the 2403. Now, if you had good eyes you might have seen it. The object that stopped this watch from running. You guessed it ... a nylon fibre has found it's way into the wheels of the train, and gotten jammed between the Intermediate and Third Wheel. So know the mystery is solved, it's just a simple matter of cleaning and re-assembly. To Be Continued ......
  14. I have uploaded a second vid on Hairspring manipulation - this time the hairspring is twisted up and down. View here!
  15. Just a quick video to show my method of re-aligning the hairspring on the balance staff correctly after prior removal, just in case you have not marked or noted where the stud is before removal. Hope it's helpful to someone :) Watch here...
  16. Hi Everyone... I sent my Automatic watch off for repair (crown and stem replacement + pendant replacement) and when it was returned it was gaining 3 to 4 minutes per day. I have sent it back to get it sorted and now am being told that I will have to pay again as the original repair did not go anywhere near the movement. 1, I asume a stem would connect directly to the movewent. Would it?? 2, As the watch was NOT gaining before the original repair could anything they did cause the watch to gain time?? Basically, am I being ripped off?? Cheers
  17. New here, looks like a nice site. Been in the trade for the last 47 years, hope to help other and learn new things. Thanks
  18. 1. Could this be the worst reading possible on a timegrapher? 2. Where do you start in fixing this watch that has just came in for a repair? Thanks
  19. A quick step-by-step tutorial on how to replace the battery on a TAG Heuer Aquaracer. This watch belongs to a good friend, and it is in need of a battery replacement. Step 1: Remove the screw on case back. The tools I am using are a three-pins Jaxa case opener and a case holder. At first, I try to open the case-back just with the watch mounted on the case holder. But the case-back is very tightly screwed on (this is a diver watch with 300m waterproof). In the end, I secure the the case holder on a mounted bench vice to free both of my hands to open the case-back. I also find that using a three-pins opener a lot better than a two-pins, especially for a diver watch. Step 2: Check the battery The quartz movement inside this Aquaracer is a Ronda 6004.B, which uses 373 Silver-Oxide battery (or SR916SW). When I receive the watch, the battery is not fully exhausted. The small-second hand jumps every four seconds (battery-saving mode), though still keeping time it shows that the battery is weak. With battery replacement jobs, I usually receive the watch with a fully exhausted battery. To ensure that the issue is not with the movement, I always test the old battery before replacing it. A quick test on this battery shows that the problem is with the battery. A new battery is around 1.5Volts. Step 3: Grease the seals Before I screw the caseback on, I grease the caseback seal using Seiko silicon greaser (S-916) that comes with an applicator and the crown seal with Seiko greaser (TSF-451). If the seal is no longer in good condition, it is advisable to replace it also. Tip: To grease the seal on the crown, you will need to first remove the stem (or watch winder). Below is an excellent video on how to remove a stem on just about any watch. Step 4: Waterproof test The next step is to waterproof test the watch. Note: I am still saving up to get myself a waterproof tester. Job's done!
  20. In the excitement of repair, I accidentally broke the stem off. What are the tips on getting a replacement or fixing this? This is of the SeaGull TY2867 movement, not one of the popular movements. I checked website like Esslinger, the stem replacement goes by brand like ISA, Ronda, Seiko, etc. Do I get whole new stem, or just get an extender? If I getting a new stem, what to get (how can I tell which is the right one since this is not of a popular movement that I can order by caliber number)? Also, will an extender works, and is it a better/worse option? What's the general guidelines, whether to replace the whole stem or get an extender? Much appreciate your always helpful insights. Thanks
  21. I am struggling to find a way to remove the movement on this large Ingersoll watch from its case. Cannot seem to find any screws that pin the movement to the case. Tried to remove the steel spacer, it is un-movable even with pliers. Does it mean that that I have to come from the glass? If through the glass, do I pry on the small opening on the bezel (see the second picture attached)? Appreciate any helps. Thanks.
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