Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'roller jewel'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • WATCH REPAIR DISCUSSIONS
    • Watch Repairs Help & Advice
    • Your Walkthroughs and Techniques
    • Showcase Your Achievements
    • Watch Repair Tools & Equipment
    • Watch or Horology Related Videos
    • Clock Corner
  • WRT LOUNGE
    • WRT News & Announcements
    • Introduce Yourself Here
    • Your Watch Collection
    • Chat About Watches & The Industry Here
    • Relax Zone: Chat About Anything Here
    • Help & Support With This Website
  • WATCH REPAIR TUTORIALS & INFORMATION
    • Watch Repair Course
    • Watch Parts and Tools Suppliers
    • Resources and Articles

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 3 results

  1. I am working on an Elgin pocket watch grade 312. It was an estate sale purchase and was not running when purchased. I assumed that it was not running because it was very dirty and thought cleaning would solve all the problems. I completely disassembled it and ran it through an ultrasound cleaner and rinse. It came out bright and shiny and when I started to reassemble for the first time I saw that there was NO roller jewel! So, what now? Can the roller jewel be replaced by a person with very modest ability? I am including two pictures of the balance and roller plate. I do not see any s
  2. I have an old Waltham pocket watch movement which is missing the impulse pin (roller jewel). I have a limited number of actual jewels and since this is just a practice movement I thought I'd try to make one out of brass. I've seen this several times in old pieces--usually a very sloppy job. So I got some brass stock of the same diameter as the "D" in the roller table, filed it and burnished it to a high gloss. Then I took a small, very fine diamond file and filed it half flat to form the "D" I then polished the face using progressively finer sandpaper on a steel block. This works fine--s
  3. Dear readers, This is my first post. I hope we will get know one another and with your co-operation we will trade the pleasure of learning for the satisfaction of sharing one's knowledge. To illustrate my story I have added some pictures below. You can see some basic tools, a partly disassembled antique 19 lignes (42.8 diameter) lever movement and the removed parts. I had never disassembled a movement before and this one seemed like the perfect candidate to experiment, but now that I have learnt to assemble/disassemble this movement, I want to fix it. After all, we are tal
×
×
  • Create New...