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Found 13 results

  1. Hello, everybody. I wanted to share my restoration stories that I have done for a long time and thrown into my archive. First I discussed the Atomic Mars 71 Brand using Valjoux 7734. As it was seen, scratch and dial is broken. To begin with, I tried to brush the Case as Brushed and make it the first day. If it is decorated, I polished and re-painted the indexes (with acrylic paint). I usually do this in three layers so that the paint is not deleted in a short time. I replaced the case buttons and tubes with aftermarket buttons. Since the condition of the dial was in ver
  2. This is one of my first watches. I own it for more than 40 years and I stored it for years after it fell and the crystal snapped. Seven years ago I decided to restore it . I went for two or three watchmakers for an estimate but In the end I decided to do it on my own. Had to Redial/Relume, find a new crystal, gaskets, hands, bezel spring and movement overhaul. Took me a while and finally finished it a few weeks ago. I’m very pleased to wear it again (though I’m not planning to dive with it) The original watch looked like this: There was a lot on my list: Ther
  3. Hi fellow watch enthusiasts, I hope you are keeping safe & well. Having tinkered for a while, and completed the second of Mark's on-line course, I'm taking the plunge and undertaking a full dismantle, clean and reassemble of an old 1960's Tissot Seastar. As a result I have two questions, if I may. I read somewhere, that I should not subject the pallet fork to the harsh cleaning fluids, as it may damage the delicate End Stones. Is this accurate and correct and are there any other components that I should not put in the harsh cleaning fluid..? In addition, I've managed to s
  4. I mentioned to a friend that I'd been tinkering (mostly unsuccessfully) with watches (all Timex #31 movements) and he offered me the chance to try and fix his father's watch, which is a Sarcar from the late fifties. Nasty band missing a buckle. All kinds of crumbly blue-green patina/corrosion. Crystal (doesn't seem original) pretty well scratched up. After cleaning the band with saddle soap and leather restorer, polishing the crystal, and scraping as much crud off the case as I could, I opened it up to find quite a pretty interior, though something way beyond anything I've ever opened up.
  5. Hi, I will be working on restoring Perrelet James Cook Antarctica. For those who may not know the brand, Perrelet takes its name from Abraham Louis Perrelet, the inventor of automatic watch movements back in late 1700. The brand, however, did not survive through the turbulent times, and was only re-activated in the 1990s. And that's when Perrelet James Cook Antarctica was born. I would say that the Perrelet timepieces from the late 1990s and early 2000s seem to be the most beautiful to me. I think the case design and the dial are timeless, hence my personal affinity to the bran
  6. Hi Everyone, Recently I have become obsessed with ana digi watches from the 1980's! I really dig the style for some reason. I was looking on ebay in the low price ranges and I found this little nugget for the princely sum of $5.70 - the shipping from Peru was an inflated $20 AUD - so I got away with it for under $30. It came well packed in a little padded envelope. It was missing the back, had severe damage, but I didn't see any rust stains on the back. A view from the side It is a Seiko H127A-5000 - the year could be between 1979 and 1980 - there is a little bit of in
  7. Hi all, long time lurker, first time poster I've recently picked up an old Brenray cleaning machine that I want to get back in action. It's actually working perfectly - the motor spins and the heater heats up. However, it's very dirty and the paint is peeling off. I'm going to do a full clean, paint strip and repaint. I've had a look at a few of the older posts on this, so have an idea where I'm heading (I didn't want to hijack one of them!). My main question regards the heating plate. There is a wired heating disc sandwiched between two heating square metal plates (iron I presume) wi
  8. Hi all, I got kinda jealous when I read a bunch of posts about people using Photoshop or InDesign to mock up dials and print them on decals etc... I mean, I know the real way to refinish a dial is to send it to the professionals, but I've been wanting to try to make some of the cheap and cheerful Bulovas I do be a bit more presentable before I wear them... Been wanting to try some diy approaches, but I always get stopped by the first task: removing the dial markers / indices. The few posts I've read about diy dial restoration speak about using a pin or tweezers to push the dial marke
  9. So I picked up this bad boy on eBay from someone in Spain. It's pretty messed up cosmetically, and missing a heeled bush and a removing punch. Considering all that, I definitely overpaid, but oh well. I don't know how rare these are to find on eBay, so I just decided to grab it. I scraped off all the old flaking paint and found a very similar color paint at Michaels. Not a very professional job and you can see some brush strokes, but all in all it's much better. I know the colors look off in the pictures, but that's a camera white balance issue. In real
  10. Okay, for those who notice nitty little details (as I think most watchmakers do) I am aware that the hands need to be corrected. My only excuse was that when I got around to putting on the hands it was towards the end of the day and I just wanted to case the thing and see how well it kept time. Haven't had the time to go back to it. Anyway, I titled this entry the way I did because it indicates something I love and the reason I entered watchmaking. For I found this watch in an old box (of old remnants thrown in free with some things I bought at a trade fair), lens-less, dirty (inside a
  11. Some of you already know that I bought myself as a birthday present, and to celebrate the birth of my first daughter, a Landeron 248 based Chronograph to restore / fix, and that I thought that it was a redial. Here the thread about it: Apparently it is not only the case ot a simple redial (albeit with a wrong dial which was adapted) but what I would define as "watchmaker's botchery", since the dial itself was fixed to the case with 2 screws (and from the front side...):
  12. Thought you guys may be interested in my latest project. full write up on my blog, but a few pics below Started from this.. to this.....
  13. Dear friends, This small centenary pocket watch of my collection came to me without a crown as you can see. This is a pity, since the mainspring and balance test as working and everything else seems to be in good condition. The stem sits correctly inside the sleeve and can be adjusted to two positions (winding/time setting). I have taken some measurements in case any one has a spare crown of the correct size: Crown (base): 4.6 mm. Sleeve (outer diameter): 3.36 mm. Stem (length): 9.44 mm. Thread (length): 1.72 mm. Thread (width): 1.14 mm. Square end: 0.99 mm. Thi
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