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Found 27 results

  1. Hi everyone, I recently got an amazing Hamilton Sea Cliff 3 watch from the early 70s powered by a handwound cal.61. I received the watch and it had not been serviced in a very long time. I serviced the watch but unfortunately used an oil pick that was too large to take the elastor shock absorbing spring out to get to the endstones. I accidentally broke one of the two levers off in the process and am now left with a functioning movement that I am afraid might become easily damaged by displacement of the endstones from small shocks. I have included a photo of the KIF Elastor spring below. I looked all over the internet, and i cannot find a supplier that will sell to me (not a trained or professional watchmaker). Does anybody know where I can get one of these springs? It would be greatly appreciated if somebody could lead me in the right direction as to where to get one and how to tell if it is the 3-3 or 3-2 sizing or even have any idea what ETA movement this cal.61 is based on as there is not a complete database of these movements online.:( Thank you everyone for your help!! -Emil:)
  2. ETA 7751 equivalent

    Hi, Can anyone help? I have a watch case that will exactly fit an ETA7751 movement but I cannot source or afford the movement. So I am on the lookout for an equivalent movement but am new to this. Can anyone advise which I should go for? Thanks.
  3. Hi, Can anyone point me in the right direction to where I can economically buy a Valjoux ETA 7751 movement, dial, hands, day/date and moon phase dials? I am based in the U.K.
  4. I have dissembled, cleaned and reassembled my first movement—an ETA 980.163. With my lack of experience it took me about a month working off and on. It’s hard to appreciate just how small the parts are until one has to try to handle them and place them in the movement. Anyway, I assembled the watch and it runs (for now) I tried to be careful about keeping everything clean but I may have introduced more dirt than I cleaned out of the components/movement.I had a question about the order of reassembly. I used the ETA Technical Communication guide to assist me in remembering where the components went as well as the order of how to assemble them. When assembling the train wheels I followed the “order of assembly” and discovered that assembly of two of the train wheels seems to be out of the correct order. I have pictures and screen shots from the guide for reference (I used an ETA 980.153 because I found pictures of the movement online—it’s basically the same as the 980.163. Here is the link to the ETA 980.153 guide.The order of assembly calls for the second wheel (19) then the third wheel (20) followed by the intermediate wheel (21) in that order. If this order is followed 20 is placed between 21 and 19. This causes two problems: 1) the small gear on 21 will not engage wheel 19 because it’s too high, and 2) the pivot on 21 is too high when trying to place the train bridge. The image shows the correct assembly and is as follows: the rotor (12) drives 21 which drives 19 (via the small gear not visible--under 21) then 19 drives 20. The assembly drawing clearly shows the wrong order for these wheels to engage correctly. I struggled for weeks trying to assemble it according to the ETA guide. Once I stopped doing that and actually looked at how the wheels engage I saw that the correct order of assembly is 19 – then 21 and finally 20. If I’m an idiot, or my lack of experience was causing my problem please tell me. The bottom line is that the movement runs (all the hands are going round and round as expected). Watch has been running for about 2 months now. For Reference19 second wheel20 third wheel21 intermediate wheel12 rotor
  5. Evening all. Would anyone be able to tell me if the ratchet wheel from the Omega 2500c and the ETA 2892.A2 are the same? i've been having a look at cousins and the part for the Omega 2500c seems to be coming up as - Ratchet Wheel, Frederik Piquet 0021 31.020 priced at just over £14. However the Omega 2500c is based on the ETA 2892.A2 and the ratchet wheel for that is - Ratchet Wheel ( 415 ), ETA 2890 priced at £8.95 Its the Co-axial Movement. Thanks for any advice.
  6. Hi guys, Was wondering if you could help identify this movement. It has rusted and needs replacing! Unfortunately, there is no codes on it. It looks very similar to a Rotary I have, but looks a little wider. Kind regards, Alan.
  7. I am in the process of reassembling my 2893-1 - see the previous (part 1) post for disassembly instructions, etc. I will post pics when complete. But I have hit a bit of a snag. I have discovered that the fourth wheel is not seated properly on its post - it is slanted which causes it to wobble in the train. I am struggling a bit to try and find the correct combination of stake and stump to repair this. I have managed to improve it, but not enough. Here is a pic from the disassembly thread that shows the construction. It's the wheel on the bottom. If you zoom in you can see that it is pressed onto the pinion. Curious if others have preferred techniques for dealing with this.
  8. Service Walk Through – ETA 2893-1 / Hamilton Khaki: Part 1 - Disassembly This is part 1 of my service of a Hamilton Khaki – dual time zone automatic based on the ETA 2893-1 movement. I purchased the watch on eBay and it runs for a short time then stops. Looks like it could use a good cleaning. Note that the part numbers in the images and text are consistent with those found in the ETA technical document for this movement. Disassembly of this movement is quite straightforward. The only "special" tool you need would be an oscillating weight bolt tool - and you only need this if you intend to remove the ball bearing assembly from the oscillating weight, which really isn't required. In this tear down I do use the tool - only because I recently acquired it and wanted to see how it worked Off we go.... The dial shows evidence of some sloppy workmanship in the watch's past – several scratches from prior hand removal. Here you see the back of the 2893-1 with its automatic rotor - nicely signed Hamilton. The arrows indicate the location of the dial screws which secure the dial to the movement. These screws have a flat. Turn them just enough so the flat is facing the dial foot and the dial pops right off. Secure the screws so they don’t pop off during cleaning. Preparing to remove the hands – with a safety sheet in place. After removing the dial, remove the Dial Support Ring (47). This ring keeps the dial the proper distance from the second timezone disc. Without it, the disc will rub against the dial. Remove the second timezone disc, or what ETA calls the Universal Hour Indicator (46) from the center. This is a bit tricky as there’s no obvious place to grip it. I used two very small screwdrivers on each side to lift the indicator straight up. Be careful not to scratch it! With the disc removed, we can now remove the Dial Washer / Friction Spring (45), Corrector Setting Wheel (44) and Hour Indicator Driving Wheel (43). The Hour Wheel (42) can now be lifted off, followed by the Additional Indicator Maintaining Plate (41). Next components to remove are the Date Indicator Maintaining Plate (40) and the Minute Train Bridge (35). We move on to remove the Intermediate Date Wheel (39). The Date Jumper (38) has also been exposed when we removed the maintaining plate, so we remove it. Finally, we remove the Date Indicator (37) and the Date Indicator Driving Wheel (36). Now on to some of the motion and keyless work. We remove the Minute Wheel (34), Cannon Pinion with Driving Wheel (33), Double Corrector (32), Date Corrector Intermediate Setting Wheel (31) and Setting Wheel (30). This side is almost complete. We leave the setting components in place. Removing them now would be problematic as we have yet to release tension from the mainspring. Flip the movement over and remove the automatic work. After removing the 3 blue screws (seen in the previous 2 pics) we lift the entire unit up gently by the Oscillating Weight (28). With the automatic work out of the way – I notice that the Stop Lever (Hack) is missing! Will try and source one. Back to the automatic work. Removing these 3 small screws will allow the oscillating weight to come off the Automatic Framework (21). This is a special tool designed to release the Oscillating Weight Bolt I remove the Oscillating Weight Bolt (28-3) and free the Ball Bearing (28-2) from the Oscillating Weight (28-1). There was no compelling reason to disassemble this portion of the movement, but the tool worked as expected! With the Oscillating Weight out of the way, remove the Auxiliary Reverser (27). Flip the unit over once again and remove the screw and Automatic Device Lower Bridge (26). Remove the Reverser (25), Reverser Wheel (24), Reduction Wheel (23) and Intermediate Reduction Wheel (22). A view of the underside of these components – handy when trying to remember which way to reassemble. Remove the single screw and gently lift off the Balance Assembly (20) with the Balance Complete (19). Carefully let the power down by releasing the Click (12-6) and slowly letting the crown wind down. Remove the Pallet Bridge (18) and Pallets (17). Remove the Train Wheel Bridge (16). It is secured with a hefty screw! Remove the Fourth Wheel (15), Third Wheel (14) and Escape Wheel (13). Remove the 3 screws and the Barrel Bridge (12) Flip the bridge over and lift off the Ratchet Wheel Driving Wheel (12-2) Remove the screw and the Click Plate (12-7), followed by the Click (12-6), Intermediate Ratchet Wheel (12-5), Intermediate Crown Wheel (12-4) and Crown Wheel (12-3). Note that the Intermediate Crown Wheel is under the Click Plate. When I removed the plate, the wheel was stuck to it due to some old oil. Here you can see the Intermediate Crown Wheel as it was stuck. This shows the proper placement of the wheels. Remove the Ratchet Wheel (11), the Mainspring Barrel (10) and Intermediate Wheel (9). Note the scrap of tissue that found its way onto the movement. I was so focused on taking pics that I didn’t notice. Pop the lid off the Barrel Remove the mainspring arbor And finally, remove the mainspring, leaving the empty barrel The movement side is now completely bare. Let’s flip it over and finish off the keyless work. Unscrew and remove the Setting Lever Jumper (8), Yoke (7) and the Setting Lever (6) Remove the Date Corrector Operating Lever (5), Winding Stem (4), Winding Pinion (3) and the Sliding Pinion (2) All stripped down Ready for the Ultrasonic!!! Hope you enjoyed this. In case you are interested, photo equipment used was: Camera: Nikon D5300 DSLR Lens: Nikon AF-S VR Micro-NIKKOR 105mm f/2.8G IF-ED, Shutter Release: Nikon ML-L3 Remote Shutter Release (wireless) Lighting: Polaroid Macro LED Ring Flash Tripod: Vanguard Alta Pro 263AB 100
  9. Service Walk Through – ETA 2893-1 / Hamilton Khaki: Part 1 - Disassembly This is part 1 of my service of a Hamilton Khaki – dual time zone automatic based on the ETA 2893-1 movement. I purchased the watch on eBay and it runs for a short time then stops. Looks like it could use a good cleaning. Note that the part numbers in the images and text are consistent with those found in the ETA technical document for this movement. Disassembly of this movement is quite straightforward. The only "special" tool you need would be an oscillating weight bolt tool - and you only need this if you intend to remove the ball bearing assembly from the oscillating weight, which really isn't required. In this tear down I do use the tool - only because I recently acquired it and wanted to see how it worked Off we go.... The dial shows evidence of some sloppy workmanship in the watch's past – several scratches from prior hand removal. Here you see the back of the 2893-1 with its automatic rotor - nicely signed Hamilton. Preparing to remove the hands – with a safety sheet in place. After removing the dial, remove the dial support ring. This ring keeps the dial the proper distance from the second timezone disc. Without it, the disc will rub against the dial. Remove the second timezone disc from the center. This is a bit tricky as there’s no obvious place to grip it. I used two very small screwdrivers on each side to lift the indicator straight up. Be careful not to scratch it! Disc removed. Note the following parts: Hour Wheel (42); Hour Indicator Driving Wheel (43); Corrector Setting Wheel (44); Additional Indicator Maintaining Plate (41) Pop off the dial washer – note that you cannot simply lift the hour wheel (42) off at this point. It is held in place by the hour indicator driving wheel (43). I remove the hour indicator driving wheel (43) followed by the corrector setting wheel (44). The hour wheel (42) is now simply lifted off, followed by the additional indicator maintaining plate (41). Next components to remove are the Date Indicator Maintaining Plate (40) and the Minute Train Bridge (35). We move on to remove the Intermediate Date Wheel (39). The Date Jumper (38) has also been exposed when we removed the maintaining plate, so we remove it. Finally, we remove the Date Indicator (37) and the Date Indicator Driving Wheel (36). Now on to some of the motion and keyless work. We remove the Minute Wheel (34), Cannon Pinion with Driving Wheel (33), Double Corrector (32) and Date Corrector Intermediate Setting Wheel (31). Before dealing with the rest of the keyless work, we flip the movement over and remove the automatic work. After removing the 3 blue screws we lift the entire unit up gently by the Oscillating Weight (28). With the automatic work out of the way – I notice that the Stop Lever (Hack) is missing! Will try and source one. Back to the automatic work. Removing these 3 screws will allow the oscillating weight to come off the Automatic Framework (21) and its components. Using the appropriate Bolt tool (pictured with the red handle) – I remove the Oscillating Weight Bolt (28-3) and free the Ball Bearing (28-2) from the Oscillating Weight (28-1). There was no compelling reason to disassemble this portion of the movement. With the Oscillating Weight out of the way, remove the Auxiliary Reverser (27). Flip the unit over once again and remove the screw and Automatic Device Lower Bridge (26). Remove the Reverser (25), Reverser Wheel (24), Reduction Wheel (23) and Intermediate Reduction Wheel (22). A view of the underside of these components Remove the single screw and gently lift off the Balance Assembly (20) with the Balance Complete (19). Carefully let the power down by releasing the Click (12-6) and slowly letting the crown wind down. Remove the Pallet Bridge (18) and Pallets (17). Remove the Train Wheel Bridge (16). Remove the Fourth Wheel (15), Third Wheel (14) and Escape Wheel (13). Remove the 3 screws and the Barrel Bridge (12) Flip the bridge over and lift off the Ratchet Wheel Driving Wheel (12-2) Remove the screw and the Click Plate (12-7), followed by the Click (12-6), Intermediate Ratchet Wheel (12-5), Intermediate Crown Wheel (12-4) and Crown Wheel (12-3). Note that the Intermediate Crown Wheel is under the Click Plate. When I removed the plate, the wheel was stuck to it due to some old oil. Here you can see the Intermediate Crown Wheel as it was stuck. This shows the proper placement of the wheels. Remove the Ratchet Wheel (11), the Mainspring Barrel (10) and Intermediate Wheel (9). Note the scrap of tissue that found its way onto the movement. I was so focused on taking pics that I didn’t notice J Pop the lid off the barrel. Remove the mainspring arbor And finally, remove the mainspring The movement side is now completely bare. Let’s flip it over and finish off the keyless work. Unscrew and remove the Setting Lever Jumper (8), Yoke (7) and the Setting Lever (6) Remove the Date Corrector Operating Lever (5), Winding Stem (4), Winding Pinion (3) and the Sliding Pinion (2) All stripped down Ready for the Ultrasonic!!! Hope you enjoyed this.
  10. Also merely to gather more and more experience, I bought two ETA 2472 over the time for little money on ebay. I think they were less than 20 EUR each. I already worked on one which did not work, since one of the escapement wheel pivots was sheared off. I demagnetized the movement which I hadn't worked on earlier and put on the timegrapher. The result is excellent, especially since the beat error is zero. I did not adjust anything yet. For the first movement I ordered a replacement escapement wheel on ebay. Unfortunately the seller didn't pack it properly. This is the result: A bent wheel. I was able to fix it with this trueing caliper which I also got for very little money on ebay. This is the result of the movement with the repaired escapement wheel. BTW the seller of the bent wheel refunded me and apologized. He asked me to keep the bent part. The movement which I will work on now has a problem in the date mechanism. The date just doesn't move after midnight. I assume it's a problem of lubrication. Let's see. I will now disassemble the movement. I will use the order that ETA suggests on the 2824, @bobm12, this thread is only for you Cheers Alexander
  11. To gain more experience I will now reassemble an ETA 2671 movement. This movement is taken from the watch of my wife a couple of months ago, and I screwed it up: destroyed the hairspring and also destroyed the spring click (434), which is a very delicate part. Very different from other movements I saw before. The watch of my wife came back to life after I bought a used entire 2671 and just replaced it. Now I have all the spares, and want to reassemble it. The pictures were taken before I learned how to do that. The new ones will be much better. Here are not too many pictures of the disassembly. I will post all stages of assembly here, so that anyone who needs to service a 2761 can see the reverse disassembly order.
  12. Hi, As I said I need more practice and I found an ETA 2369 in my collection of potential patients that is not running. This is what I found, before I took off the hands and dial (sorry, no photo of that state): The keyless work is strangely not functioning. I can pull the crown, it does "click" but it's stuck in setting mode (like if the crown was pulled) If I wind it by using the screw of the ratchet wheel it does not start ticking. The first thing I did was: Demagnetize Remove the hands and dial Take pictures of the movement from both sides I will continue in a fast pace now since I already disassembled everything and present the pictures now. Cheers Alexander
  13. Came across this E*** site whilst trawling for stuff. Thought it may be useful to others. They have some nice bits of quality parts etc for sale. Swiss based. http://stores.ebay.co.uk/SWISS-MADE-TIME/_i.html?rt=nc&_sid=28442601&_trksid=p4634.c0.m14.l1513&_pgn=1 Anybody want to try this out!!! http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/ETA-2824-2-CREATIVE-2-LAYER-Dial-34-3mm-WHITE-/131380565718?hash=item1e96e456d6
  14. ETA 2783 - Dial Feet

    I've scoured the usual sources, including the ETA Customer Service site, but I can't seem to find a cross reference for the dial feet locations on an ETA 2783 compared with the 2824 or 2836 movements. Many aftermarket dials are advertised as fitting these latter movements and if I can determine whether the location and diameter of their dial holes match my 2783, then I'm sure to succeed with an aftermarket dial. The dial feet holes on the 2783 are at (eye-balling) 11 minutes and 41 minutes, and center-to-center diameter of 24.0mm. Any suggestions for a data source? Anyone have a 2824 or 2836 sitting on their bench and their calipers close at hand and bounce me a reply with a measurement as above? Thanks as always.
  15. Morning peeps, I have this watch where the month that does change automatically. it will quick change via the button. I believe the speciation's are as below. can anybody shed any light on the calendar module and if it actually should change automatically?? ETA 2824-2 base + a Jaquet 3105 calendar module Cheers always. James.
  16. Eta 2895-2 Help

    Good Day Everyone, I am a new member to Watch Repair Talk and a new horological hobbyist tackling my own personal repairs as needed. I have been tinkering with watches for a few years on my free time starting with non-function pieces I picked up from swap meets, garage sales, estate sales, etc. with successes or understanding of complications and how they work together. Recently one of my personal time pieces (a prized possession of mine) was due for service, an Omega 1164 (ETA7750i) Calibre Seamaster Professional. After seeing the costs for servicing from various places, I subscribed to Mark's YouTube Channel and decided to tackle the task myself spending the equal money for a repair on "proper" tools and lubricants to complete the task and I DID IT (Thank you Mark for your amazing videos, I couldn't do it with you!)! After much pride and bragging among family and friends that cared to listen I kind of became the go to for battery replacements on quartz movements and band replacements. Recently a very good friend of mine came to me with a damaged timepiece that was more a user error issue and asked me if I would be willing to take on the task, and like a junkie or addict I jumped to the opportunity. The piece in question is a Bell & Ross Military Type 123 (ETA 2895-2). The time piece had a run in with a door jam and had the crown and stem pulled from the timepiece with such force that it firmly pulled the screw down attachment for the crown from the case (please forgive me if I am not using the appropriate terminology). My first thought was with that much force there must be damage within the movement, so I began the disassembly. I manged to get it apart and cleaned and started the assembly but immediately ran in to a problem. The gear train assembly is jamming when I put the movement together. I worked to gently tease the pinions in place and have had them seated in their bridge but they bind up? I have seen the videos for ETA 2892 that Mark has posted and understand the care of working with the second wheel, third wheel, and escapement. the trouble I am having is the moment I place the escapement pinion in place under the bridge the second and third wheel seize up. The second and third wheel will rotate freely but then they both stop when the escapement is in position. The movement itself is strange to me with the elongated pinion on the escapement that passes through the main plate to a jewel on the underside floating above the plate? I hope that this question makes sense to the more experienced and that they may be able to shine some light on my problem, I have checked the wheels and all of the pinions appear to be in tact. Thank you everyone for your feedback and support. I worked 2 days after work on it for a total of about 4 hours which is crazy for 3 gears and a small bridge...I am at a loss.
  17. Eta 555.115

    Hi All, I'm working on an old Heuer with a 555.115 movement in it. I am able to advance the calendar wheel when the crown is in position 2, but the calendars does not change automatically when the watch hits midnight (or ever). I've tried both letting the watch run for 48 hours, as well as just swinging the arms for a full 24 hour cycle with the crown. Does anyone have any insight on this issue? Thanks!
  18. Tissot T063.637.16.057 (ETA G15.561): It is possible to calibrate the date change moment? I've tested 3 watches, and they all had problem with date change moment: 1) 22:40, 2) 23:47, 3) 23:54. But other users report that they have date change exactly at 00:00, so may be it is possible to calibrate the moment when the date is changed?
  19. Unitas 6497 Case

    Hello all! I got my hands on a 15j Unitas 6497, and I would like to case it: Could you provide any sources of 41mm or less cases? I found something on Ofrei (http://www.ofrei.com/page1494.html), but I was wondering if there wouldn't be any smaller cases that would fit a 6497? Thank you, Bogdan
  20. ETA F05-111 Service Walkthrough "The Workhorse Of Midrange Quartz" Moving on from the ETA 955.412 service, another common quartz movement, this time found in mid-range quartz watches, is the F05 111. It doesn't have the build quality of the 955/6 model; but it's still a very robust movement, and able to be serviced. In saying that, this movement is rarely serviced by a professional watchmaker due to the low cost of a replacement movement. Personally, I think it's sad we live in such a throw-away society, and are slowly loosing the skills and confidence to performance maintenance at home. So if you've got the tools and confidence to service this movement at home, do it, and save yourself $$$. Service Manual for the F05 111 Movement ETAF05.111.pdf We will first start with the Motion Work and Calendar Work. Remove the three screws holding the Cover Plate. You will see that this also has the Date Jumper Spring incorporated into it. Next remove the Hour Wheel, and the Date Indicator Driving Wheel. Note too that there is no quick date change on this movement. Remove the Minute Train Bridge, Minute Wheel, Canon Pinion and the Sliding Pinion And that's it for this basic movement on the dial side. Flip the movement over and we'll begin on the drive side Remove the three screws marked below and lift out the Electronic Module Cover. Next remove the two remaining screws that hold the Gear Train Bridge. As you can see with plastic wheels, this is not up to the same quality and finish as the 955/6 movement. Remove the Second Wheel, Intermediate Wheel, and the Rotor I would not recommend removing the Third Wheel at this time as the IC Board circuits are directly above it, and there is no point risking damage to it. To remove the IC Board, gentle lever up the where the location pin goes through the board just at the end of the Quartz Crystal housing. This pin is often firmly pegged to the board and must be lifted up first. This will loosen the board away from the Main Plate. Then gentle lift out the IC Board by sticking a piece of Rodico to the mark position below and lifting out. This will avoid any damage to the circuit or Coil. Now that the IC Board has been removed, access for removal of the Third Wheel is risk free. You can also remove the Insulating Block at this time. This is also the time to remove the Battery Insulator, but this being just a spare movement I own, it's been used elsewhere ... sorry :unsure: The Keyless Work is now exposed, and is a very basic setup, being held only with 1 shouldered screw. The movement is now completely stripped and ready for cleaning. All the parts can go in for cleaning EXCEPT the following Date Ring Rotor IC Board PLEASE NOTE: Due to most of the wheels being plastic, be careful when you come to the heating/drying stage if you are using an Elma/Pearl Parts Cleaner. Make sure the basket is high up in the drying cylinder and ONLY RUN FOR 11 MINUTES MAXIUM ... too much heat isn't good for those little plastic wheels. I hope this has been fun and edifying to read. I'll post the assembly procedures latter tonight after dinner ... my tummy is talking to me :)
  21. ETA 955 Service Walkthrough "The Workhorse of Highend Quartz" The ETA 955 and 956 Quartz Movements are the most commonly found movement in high-end quartz watches with three hands and a date feature. You will find them in Omega, Tag, and many other brands on the market. For this walkthrough I will be using an 955.412 Movement as my example; but the 956 is so similar to the 955, that this walkthrough will suffice for both. Please note that the numbers after the decimal place only relates to the factory in which the movement was made, so yours could read 955.112, or another factory number ... regardless, the parts are identical and interchangeable. As with all movements, quartz or mechanical, they have a service interval that should be adhered to for longevity of the movement. With quartz movements when the lubrication becomes dried out, or the movement becomes dirty, they will draw more and more current from the battery in order to maintain accurate time keeping. The ETA 955/6, when in optimum condition should draw around 800nA ~ 1.5uA, if the movement is drawing more power than this, a service is required. If a service is not performed, the battery life with decrease markedly, and can go as far as drawing more power from the battery than it was designed for, and damage the battery and cause it to leak and corrode your valuable time piece. Service Manual for the 955/6 Movement CT_956412_FDE_493024_06.pdf.PDF Disassembly Remove the two Date Wheel Keepers. I always start with the one holding the Date Jumper Spring in place. Sometimes the Date Jumper Spring can ping out of place, so be careful when removing the keeper plate above it. Here is a reference photo in case it moves before you see how it's properly seated. Next remove the Keepers and Date Wheel. Then remove the Date Jumper Spring, Motion and Calendar Work. This will leave only the Keyless Work; remove the Yoke and the Sliding Pinion only. We need to flip the movement over, and disassemble the IC Board before we can remove the rest of the Keyless Work. With the movement flipped over, remove the 3 screws holding the Coil Protector. Note for re-assembly the Gold Screw in the centre. Now that the Coil Protector is removed, GREAT care must be taken not to damage the exposed fine windings of the Coil. Then to remove the IC Board, simply remove the 2 remaining screws that hold it. Do this slowly and carefully, as you do not want to slip off the screw and damage this delicate circuit. The same level of care needs to be taken when removing the IC Board from the Main Plate. Take your time and carefully lift it off and store it immediately out of harms way. Next remove the black Insulator Block, and Battery Insulator. This will expose the Setting Lever Spring Clip, which will enable you to remove the rest of the Keyless Work. To remove the Setting Lever Spring Clip, place both points of your tweezers on the locations where I've placed the stars and gently push down on the spring. Then with a piece of Pegwood, push the spring in the direction of the arrow until it moves to the larger opening slot. This will now allow the Setting Lever to be removed, along with the rest of the Keyless Work. Next remove the Stop Lever and Switch, and remove the one screw holding the Train Bridge in place. Then carefully remove the Gear Train and the Rotor. The movement is now completely stripped and ready for inspection and cleaning. There are some parts that you do not place in the parts cleaner, they are as follows: Date Ring Rotor IC Board The rest should be demagnetized prior to cleaning to avoid any metal particles in your cleaning solution from sticking to your parts. When cleaning I also including the Insulator Block, and Battery Insulator in the basket, normal watch cleaning solutions do not harm these items and it is essential they are completely clean to provide the best insulation possible. The Rotor should be cleaned by use of Rodico. As you can see from the picture below, it's surprising the dirt and old oil this will remove ... and it is sufficient cleaning for the Rotor. I hope this has been a help to you, and I will post the assembly procedure later today, if time permits.
  22. Just wonderd what your views were on this? For anyone not knowing, ETA announced a while back they are stopping the sale of all spare parts on December 31st 2015. After this date only Authorised service centres will b able to get them, so once cousins, boley etc supplies have been exhausted we will no longer be able to get them, meaning the customer has to pay extortiate prices. What do you think?
  23. Just uploaded a new four part series on the Omega Seamaster Co-Axial (with a 2500 movement). This is about 1 hour long so I have split it into four parts. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwP8fNxqhOvPfgwFF1qHaERl5DuZ-zXqA
  24. ETA Caliber 2540 Complete Service Walkthrough Looking for more movements that would expand my training scope. I found this one on the Fleabay: an ETA 2540. It's a "New Old Stock (NOS)" replacement movement, therefore it's not cased, and came with no hands. As there are many ladies watches, especially vintage ones, that are very small, this was my next obvious choice of movement to work on. As you can see next to my thumb nail, it's quite a small and compact movement indeed. Disassembly First remove the Hour Wheel, and leave the tension spring in place. Remove the Minute Wheel, Canon Pinion with Drive Wheel, and the Winding Pinion. The Canon Pinion on this movement isn't the standard fiction fit, it is a "Circlip" type fitting with the Driving Wheel. Therefore no pinion puller is required on this movement. Below is a reference photo. The motion work is now removed, so it's time to turn the movement over. With the Movement turned over, release all tension from the Mainspring. Remove the Balance. Remove the Pallet Cock and Fork. Remove the Crown Wheel and Ratchet. Remove the Click and Click Spring, then the Barrel Bridge. Here is a reference Photo of the Click Spring. Remove the Train Bridge. Remove the Second Wheel, Third Wheel, Intermediate Wheel, Escape Wheel and lastly the Barrel. Finally turn the movement back over, and complete the disassembly by removing the Keyless Work. Remove the Setting Lever Spring. Remove the Yoke Spring and then the Yoke. Then remove the flip the movement over and unscrew the Setting Lever Screw. Pull the Stem out and the Clutch Wheel and Winding Pinion will fall out. Here is a reference photo of the Yoke Spring. Disassembly is now complete.