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Found 3 results

  1. Apologies for the incorrect lingo. My watch is this model: Hugo Boss HB-286-1-14-2893 And some pictures here: https://imgur.com/a/Y9lawhR I do not mind getting some tools myself to to this. And if possible, I would like to know where to buy a replacement back cover and straps, as they are pretty worn out.
  2. Hello! I took my trusty Swiss Army Watch (24221) to an electronics store for a battery change, and they tried a battery that was a hair too thick, then one that was too thin, before we found the proper size (Renata 371 in case anyone has the same problem). However, the watch did not spring back to life. It had worked fine prior to the battery change (except that it was signalling low voltage with that jumpy sweep of the second hand every few seconds). Also, I was present for the whole procedure and didn't see any undue handling or any insulators falling out or anything that could explain it not restarting. Does anyone have an idea what the problem could be? I'd prefer not to throw out one of my favorite watches if there is still something that can be done, or at least know how to verify that it is really dead. I read that sometimes the "gears have to be spun" to resuscitate the movement, and that this can be done physically or magnetically. How is that done? I'd appreciate any advice from the highly skilled readership here! Cheers!
  3. A quick step-by-step tutorial on how to replace the battery on a TAG Heuer Aquaracer. This watch belongs to a good friend, and it is in need of a battery replacement. Step 1: Remove the screw on case back. The tools I am using are a three-pins Jaxa case opener and a case holder. At first, I try to open the case-back just with the watch mounted on the case holder. But the case-back is very tightly screwed on (this is a diver watch with 300m waterproof). In the end, I secure the the case holder on a mounted bench vice to free both of my hands to open the case-back. I also find that using a three-pins opener a lot better than a two-pins, especially for a diver watch. Step 2: Check the battery The quartz movement inside this Aquaracer is a Ronda 6004.B, which uses 373 Silver-Oxide battery (or SR916SW). When I receive the watch, the battery is not fully exhausted. The small-second hand jumps every four seconds (battery-saving mode), though still keeping time it shows that the battery is weak. With battery replacement jobs, I usually receive the watch with a fully exhausted battery. To ensure that the issue is not with the movement, I always test the old battery before replacing it. A quick test on this battery shows that the problem is with the battery. A new battery is around 1.5Volts. Step 3: Grease the seals Before I screw the caseback on, I grease the caseback seal using Seiko silicon greaser (S-916) that comes with an applicator and the crown seal with Seiko greaser (TSF-451). If the seal is no longer in good condition, it is advisable to replace it also. Tip: To grease the seal on the crown, you will need to first remove the stem (or watch winder). Below is an excellent video on how to remove a stem on just about any watch. Step 4: Waterproof test The next step is to waterproof test the watch. Note: I am still saving up to get myself a waterproof tester. Job's done!
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