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Found 3 results

  1. Hello all, I know it's 'only' an electrical one but to say I'm overjoyed is a bit of an understatement. My Grandfather gave me this, his 1982 retirement watch, 20 years ago as an empty case and strap - the innards had apperently been slowly demolished over the years by a leaky battery and where nowhere to be found. At the start of the locky-down thing I decided it was time to do a bit of research to see if the parts could be found to rebuild it, bit of a baptism of fire as a total newby. It soon became evident that this search should have been done years ago because Omega restricted parts coupled with a dearth of NOS parts was a real headache! Through all this research I also realised just how rare the case and bracelet style were so persisted for months, getting my claws on some old, rough, nasty and for want of a better word, crap bits and pieces. As we know the circuit and coil are getting really rare but even more rare it seems are the winding pinions and dials for them, and even the crap parts are ludicrously expensive. You know how you get into something, buy bits, realise your up to your neck in it but realise you're to far in it to retreat? Suffice to say, I've had so much support from several people in the watchmaker community so with their help and shear dogged, billigerence and blatant stubbornness it is finally running. Still some work to do - the date needs to start changing at half 11 because it takes two hours to change, the seconds hand needs lining up better with the minute markers and I've toyed with the idea of restoring the dial, with some lacquer and minute markers missing (or maybe not, as it's a sign of its individuality!) Having enjoyed it for a while I'll also take it all apart again and service it, only because of Lawson''s brilliant walk-through on the 1337 movement on this forum. Never really thought of a bi-colour watch like this as my style, but with the blood, sweat, tears and more sweat and tears that has gone into it, I've decided I love it to bits. Thank you all for your never ending inspiration and such generous shared knowledge Mark Lovick and everyone - great bunch of people you lot!
  2. Hello fellow watch freaks. It's been a while since I've posted a service walkthrough, but I had an accident that destroyed my left shoulder and needed surgery. It's been a rough 6 months for me, with a LOT of soul searching throughout my recovery period. But I'm back on the bench ... at least at home anyway; work is a different matter, and my close friends on this forum know about that ... nuff said. This watch is owned by one of my older brother's friends. My older brother is one of the most selfless people I know, and has always been there for me. So when he asked me to do this for him it became TOP priority. It was the first item his friend purchased after he left school and began work: so there's a lot of good memories tied to this watch. As you can see it's an older quartz Seamaster with an 1337 Movement. On first inspection you can see water damage to the Dial @ 3 o'clock. So I wasn't expecting to see a happy movement inside. But when I got the Caseback off things didn't look too bad at all. Just a bit of corrosion from a cheap nasty Chinese battery. The movement still looked nice and shiny and the Stem only had a touch of rust up near the Crown. So this watch looks like one we can save :) Disassembly OK, lets begin. Fist remove the Hands and Dial from the movement. Again, absolutely no moisture damage under the Dial ... this made me VERY happy indeed. So on to the Movement Holder it goes. Remove the Battery Clamp and Insulator Ring. Then remove the 4 screws that hold the Circuit Cover. Note that there is an insulator under the cover. It is very delicate, so great care should be taken when handling it. Once the cover is removed the circuit is exposed; but before removing it, unscrew the 2 screws holding the Coil Protector and remove it. Then unscrew the Coil, and remove the Circuit and Coil. Place both the Circuit and Coil in a safe place to avoid damage, as this parts are obsolete, and if damaged you'll have to scour the internet for a donor movement ... good luck with that!! Next remove the Train Bridge Here is a reference photo of the train. As you can see, the Rotor is a very different looking animal to the modern ETA rotors. Carefully remove all the wheels, and store the Rotor in a safe place AWAY from the rest of the parts to be cleaned ... as this has to be hand cleaned due to it being magnetic. Please Note: There is a very small washer that fits between the minute wheel and the extended pivot of the Second Wheel. Be sure to identify it, and make sure it's put in the small parts container for cleaning. Here's the complete train removed from the movement for reference. Flip the movement over in the holder and remove the 3 screws of the cover that holds the Calendar Ring. As you can see that Motion Work and Calendar Work are fairly complex on this movement. Make sure you take good reference photos and study them carefully so they are not confused with wheels of the train. Remove the Calendar Ring. Remove the Motion Work and Calendar Work. Here's the complete Motion Work and Calendar Work removed from the movement for reference. The Crown and Clutch should now be able to be removed. Flip the movement over once again to tackle the Keyless Work Unscrew and remove the Setting Lever Spring. Lastly unscrew and remove the Setting Lever, Intermediate Wheel and Yoke. The Omega 1337 Movement is now completely disassembled and ready for cleaning. I will post the assembly soon.
  3. I have one of these in for service, cant figure out why the hour hand does not go round when time is set. The hour hand sets OK although sometimes it clicks every hour and other times it runs smooth. The minutes and seconds function fine even when setting the time. http://www.old-omegas.com/1337en.html Maybe a problem with the magnetic wheel on the date set? I looked under the microscope and it looks like the 2 part magnetic wheel on the date side is only rotating on the bottom half and not transferring the force to the top half to the hour wheel. Any ideas on how to remedy it and get her going again?? Omega 1332.pdf
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