Jump to content
  • The watch repair course and videos section has moved - if you are a Patron via Patreon or a WRT Subscriber, kindly create an account here: https://www.watchrepairlessons.com, if you have not done so already, in order to continue with your access to the Early Access and Ad-Free videos.

    The Patron and Subscribers section in the WatchRepairLessons.com dashboard (direct link) will detail all your subscription details. 

    This will help me consolidate all my videos under one roof rather than maintaining two separate systems, and it will also help clean up WRT a bit.

    If you have any questions please message me, Mark :)

    • Watch Repair Tutorials & Information
    • WRT LOUNGE
      • WRT News & Announcements
      • Introduce Yourself Here
      • Chat About Anything Here
      • Chat About Watches & The Industry Here
      • Your Watch Collection
      • Help & Support With This Website
    • WATCH REPAIR DISCUSSIONS
      • Your Projects, Walkthroughs and Techniques
      • Watch Repairs Help & Advice
      • Watch Repair Tools & Equipment
      • Watch Repair Gallery
      • Clock Corner
    • OTHER RESOURCES
      • Watch Technical Data & Service Sheets
      • Watch Repair Videos
      • Directory of other Horology related websites
  • Recent Topics

  • Posts

    • As it happens! Inspired and interested by this thread and having, for a long time cleaned manually with naphtha and IPA etc, (which has always been adequate for me and more than adequate volume wise as I only work on one at a time). I chanced a bid on one on eBay which I am now arranging transport for and appears to be the same (or close) as yours. So I'll be checking it and re reading this thread to see what I need to do to ensure it's safe to use. It'll only be accessed by me and only used when I'm there and unplugged at other times so I'll be looking for info on cleaning fluid and operation instructions once I know it's usable.
    • This part has the generic / universal part number of 445. If you go to ebay and search for landeron 48 445 you will see various available.
    • Further to this post I obtained a 955.412 which came with a normal stem. I tried the original stem but it didn't fit. Tried to look for split stem for this movement but have not had any luck. Any ideas? B. 
    • Greetings folks. I've been working on watches as a hobby for about 20 years now.  I started out on pocket watches and have never cleaned a clock. In fact, I had a great cleaning machine, with the big jars, and a few other clock tools, that I gave away to an aspiring clock guy over at the Tascione site. But I digress... Nearly 20 years ago I bought a Hamilton model 21 ship's chronometer. It's an early one, pre 400 serial number, and is a thing of beauty, as these generally are. Back when I got it, I had a professional service it for me. It was done well, but wasn't cheap. $400-500, IIRC. I used to display it in my living room and run it occasionally just to hear the escapement and marvel it its accuracy. From about 2009 to 2014 it sat in my storage unit, waiting for new digs. In 2014 I wound it up and it took off running. I let it run down and then put it away for a couple of years. When I pulled it out, I discovered that it had a broken balance pivot. While originally I thought someone had knocked it over and wasn't copping to it, but now, after inspecting the upper pivot's wear, I don't think that's the case. After botching the first staff I got trying to replace the hub, I set it aside again for the past couple of years. The way I broke the staff was I overestimated how deep the hollowness went in my hollow punch that I was using to tap it on. It bottomed out in the punch and destroyed the pivot. Now that I'm finally over that disappointment, I decided to give it another go. I bought a staff that already had the hub installed. I may have to polish the lower pivot, as it doesn't seem to want to set in the hole jewel properly. I'm in the process of verifying all of this. I had to tear down the chronometer at least to the point where I could check to see if the broken part of the pivot was impeding the staff from setting properly. The hole jewel is clear. I'm doing the best I can to do it right, and get it running again. I won't be running it, but want it running just in case I should decide to sell it. Otherwise the value drops quite a bit. Since I have it completely torn down now, I might as well clean and oil it. Does anyone have a hot tip on the best cleaning solutions for cleaning these chronometers? I'd like to use something that will cross over and work for my cleaning of watches as well. I have both an ultrasonic and the small L&R mechanical. I have one more fresh batch of cleaner and rinse, petroleum, no-water, formula. Should I use that, or make, or get, something new? Any tips for oil and grease types to get me by? Any suggestions are appreciated. I do have the Manual for the movement. I know that this is risky business, my working on this chrono, but I just can't afford to spend another $500 to get it running. Plus, I heard that if you're going to run these, you've got to spend this $500 or so to service them every few years. That is not going to happen. Feedback, suggestions, warnings, tips, etc., are all welcome. Many thanks. Cheers.  
    • Hello - I have Tag Heuer F1 Chronograph ca1212-ro, which I've had for many, many years.  Recently I noticed a pusher "cap" had come off and was lost, I have sourced an new pusher, and have removed the movement but am at a loss for how to remove the pusher from the case???  The new pusher is not threaded so I'm assuming the old one is not either - assuming the pusher I was sold is correct.  Are the pushers a o-ring press fit, are they "glued" in, how are they removed and reinstalled?  Any help is greatly appreciated!  Thanks - Nick
×
×
  • Create New...