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ChrisRadek

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About ChrisRadek

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  1. The largest diameter was 2.2mm, the pivots were .24, so about twice the size of an 18s balance staff.
  2. Yeah. When I was equipping my current shop I went to the flooring store and asked for help. I explained what I was doing, and how I want a bright, smooth, even color that will make the tiniest thing on it easily visible. He said OH so you want exactly the OPPOSITE of what everyone ELSE in the world wants! Now the fad is fake tile squares, fake wood strips, etc, instead of a roll of something you put down across the whole room. You really want the solid piece with no seams. We found something good enough, but the color is not perfectly uniform. I installed it under the baseboards
  3. That is beautiful! But is it sitting on carpet? That's bad...
  4. I really only use the small baskets, I have three of them so I can fill one while another is running. Often I use two baskets for the same watch, it takes two or more runs to clean everything, especially a chronograph or an 18s pocket watch where not everything will fit in there at once. I have the ultrasonic unit so the jars have to be filled up above the L&R letters, and with the ultrasonic the fill level is very critical. The fluid should be up the ultrasonic head about a cm when it's running. If you are not using the ultrasonic I'd say fill them enough that the basket stays
  5. My rinse's jug just says L&R Ultrasonic Watch Rinsing Solution. An older one waiting for disposal does say #3 though, I don't know what the difference is. I use the ammoniated #111 cleaner. After the dry cycle, the basket on mine is too hot to touch for a few minutes. I doubt there is any appreciable risk of fire if you are using the solutions meant for the machine. I think we would have heard about it? I will be interested to hear if you determine yours is also wired wrong (or what I call wrong, anyway?) in the way that gives a faster dry and slower spinoff. Oh, does yo
  6. Sorry, "You can't" might be a little strong. If you give up on using the electro-mechanical timing and synchronizing system built into the machine out of simple cams and switches, and replace all that with a computer of some kind, you can of course make it do whatever you want. In my opinion that's unnecessary, and unnecessary computers should be avoided in things that I need to rely on for a long time.
  7. You can't, the time is fixed because the indexing motor runs a certain speed and it runs constantly until the basket drops into the next jar. You should concentrate instead on making sure the spin-off speed is as high as possible without causing the fluid in the jar to swirl around and splash up and out. All the speeds are controlled together with the rheostat you can set with a screwdriver. But the proportions of the speeds to one another are controlled by the taps on the wirewound resistor that you can move. I forget the exact details ... do you have the manual? It's all spelled out
  8. The .15 instead of .10 will be WAY too strong and will cause galloping (too high amplitude). The 292 vs 300 length makes no difference, go ahead and use that one. Swigart shows the 10AN as 5x11x11 3/4, which as you say is 1.4 x .10 mm. Interestingly, Bestfit shows it as 5x10x10 1/2. This makes sense, if you use a thicker/stronger spring you have to make it a little shorter so the barrel doesn't fill up too much. The 11 3/4 inches is 298.5mm, but again the exact length doesn't matter. Looks like Borel has a suitable part MS-511K. (or 510H if you prefer the stronger but shorter len
  9. That is called the "Switch lever" and its part number is 4450 005.
  10. Hi all, I signed up because I wanted to answer a question, but it looks like I'm not allowed to do that until I introduce myself, so ... hello! I'm Chris, I'm a watchmaker. I'm not sure what else to say so I'll share cool photos. My most interesting project this week was a staff for the flywheel/inertial damper in a Seiko "crystal chronometer" QC951-II which is a very early quartz ship's chronometer from 1967. It had been dropped, breaking a pivot on the flywheel and it had a few other problems. This was just like making a custom balance staff. Sometimes it's easie
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