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Bill3

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Status Replies posted by Bill3

  1. Our last daughter got married and moved just 5 months ago so I know what you are going through. Anytime you are ready to start again just let me know and I'll try to help talk you through it

    1. Bill3

      Bill3

      Thanks, I will be back in touch!

  2. Hi,

       Ok now we are getting somewhere. First off if you have a donor set screw lets start there. If you think the screw needs to be attached under the barrel bridge then let's try that. Attach the set lever to the screw and then insert the stem and see if you can tighten it up enough to lock the stem in place. If that works you should be able to pull the stem in and out without having it come out. Then if that has worked install the barrel bridge back insuring that the head of the screw extends though the opening for it in the bridge. Since you say the set lever screw on the donor movement are installed as yours was then I'm thinking maybe your screw was bent and possibly damaged when the barrel bridge was installed over it. A good idea would be to play with the donor movements to see how the set lever works in them. Also compare the donor screw and the place on the plates both on your watch and the donor to insure the plate hasn't been damaged. The set lever should snug up to the main plate with no gap. An easy way to test and see if the set lever is good is to place it on the plate where it belongs and just hold it there with a piece of pegwood and the just pull on the stem enough to see if you feel resistance.

       One thing we are dealing with is this watch is 70 years old or better and has been worked on many times.

        

    1. Bill3

      Bill3

      CKelly,

      I am still trying to get that little screw to thread into the set lever in one of the donor watches that I have.  I have not been successful thus far.  

      I am contacting you to tell you how much I appreciate your help and to tell you that I am going to take a few days off from watch repairs.  My daughter is getting married tomorrow and as you can imagine things are hectic here.  

      Best regards,

      Bill

       

  3. Finally!  I got the screw out that holds the set lever in place.  I have attached a picture and you can see the broken head of the screw.  

    I am confused about how to place this screw.  There is a flange near the middle of this screw that prevents it passing through the plate.  If I places the flange exterior to the pictured plate, I do not think it would reach the set lever.  If I place it between the plate and the base plate, it will not pull the set lever close enough to the base to force the nub into the grove on the stem.  What to do......what to do.....

     

    image.jpeg

    1. Bill3

      Bill3

      I have two other "donor" 986A movements.  I have examined both and in both examples the shoulder of the screw is between the main plate and the barrel bridge.  

  4. Hi Bill,

      Actually I just got in from work.. I was going to suggest something else to do with that screw. I looked at the last picture and it appears as if the setting lever is setting up a bit higher than the plate. Seems as if it needs to be pulled down to engage the stem. So far you have been able to figure out what I was hoping for. If there is indeed a gap between the setting lever and the plate we need to ask why. That's why I was concerned that the spring may have wedged under it. Now you said something that has me thinking. Are you sure that the screw that holds the set lever should be attached as you say? What if you took the plate off, removed the screw, reattached the plate then inserted that screw through both plates and into the setting lever that way? There should be a little shoulder on that screw that prevents it from going all the way through your barrel bridge, (I think that is the plate that would have to be removed). By doing it this way the screw would be shorter thus pulling the set lever down farther to allow the nub to engage the stem. I don't know for sure as I haven't worked on that model for a while and I have seen that screw installed both ways in different watches but what I'm suggesting does explain the issue.

       Once you get the plate off it may be easier just to grab it with tweezers or a small pliers and turn it off that way rather than using a screw driver if the head is worn as you said.

      If it makes you feel better I installed a set lever screw exactly as you describe in a Heuer caliber 12 chronograph only to find out too late that I should have done it the other way and had to totally disassemble the movement and start over.

    1. Bill3

      Bill3

      The pointer is pointing at the screw that holds the set lever in place.  You can see the wear to the screw.  Half the head has worn away.image.jpegimage.jpeg

    2. (See 1 other reply to this status update)

  5. Hi Bill,

      Actually I just got in from work.. I was going to suggest something else to do with that screw. I looked at the last picture and it appears as if the setting lever is setting up a bit higher than the plate. Seems as if it needs to be pulled down to engage the stem. So far you have been able to figure out what I was hoping for. If there is indeed a gap between the setting lever and the plate we need to ask why. That's why I was concerned that the spring may have wedged under it. Now you said something that has me thinking. Are you sure that the screw that holds the set lever should be attached as you say? What if you took the plate off, removed the screw, reattached the plate then inserted that screw through both plates and into the setting lever that way? There should be a little shoulder on that screw that prevents it from going all the way through your barrel bridge, (I think that is the plate that would have to be removed). By doing it this way the screw would be shorter thus pulling the set lever down farther to allow the nub to engage the stem. I don't know for sure as I haven't worked on that model for a while and I have seen that screw installed both ways in different watches but what I'm suggesting does explain the issue.

       Once you get the plate off it may be easier just to grab it with tweezers or a small pliers and turn it off that way rather than using a screw driver if the head is worn as you said.

      If it makes you feel better I installed a set lever screw exactly as you describe in a Heuer caliber 12 chronograph only to find out too late that I should have done it the other way and had to totally disassemble the movement and start over.

    1. Bill3

      Bill3

      Actually the screw that holds the set lever is installed through both plates.  I will send you a pic as soon as I send this.  However, the screw unscrewed from the set lever and the set lever dropped off AND the screw still will not come out.  I have worked on this watch for months and time has dimmed my memory of how it goes in and out, but it will not come out with the plate on, so off it comes.  

    2. (See 1 other reply to this status update)

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