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teegee

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  1. Like
    teegee got a reaction from nickelsilver in Two extremes of chronograph movements   
    Wow, beautiful work! How long did it take you to make that? 
  2. Like
    teegee got a reaction from Tmuir in Balance Staff Diagram for Measurements   
    Nice, these type of sheets are very useful when replacing an obsolete staff. I've added mine here too, in case someone can use them. I can't remember where I got them; I may have stripped dimensions from an existing image or something like that.
    balance-staff.svg balance-staff.pdf
  3. Like
    teegee got a reaction from Nucejoe in FHF st96   
    With an amplitude that high, you're not far from hitting the banking (knocking). Hopefully your screenshot is from when the watch was fully wound, and at maximum amplitude
  4. Like
    teegee got a reaction from jdm in Pallet stone setter tool   
    Wow, that is very expensive
    Looks like a cheap riveted together model too. Better (older?) models use screws, and have indexable pallet holder pieces, for different pallet types. To be honest I've only used a single configuration..
  5. Like
    teegee got a reaction from vinn3 in Gravers   
    Just adding that making carbide gravers yourself is quite easy, from broken drills or endmills etc. There are apparently many types of carbide, and the commercial ones that I have are of a darker color than the homemade ones. 
    In the picture below, the two on the left are commercial, by Eternal tools -- pretty expensive. The rest is home made. They may look rough and crusty, but that's just the non-acting surfaces. The far right one was an experiment (very easy to make), and is actually my go-to graver for hogging hard steel. It is very hard to damage.
    If you start using carbide gravers, you need to be reasonably adept at using normal gravers, since any mistake will chip the graver or snap the tip right off. You can regrind it of course, but that's more troublesome because of the diamond tooling.

     
  6. Like
    teegee got a reaction from jdm in Gravers   
    Just adding that making carbide gravers yourself is quite easy, from broken drills or endmills etc. There are apparently many types of carbide, and the commercial ones that I have are of a darker color than the homemade ones. 
    In the picture below, the two on the left are commercial, by Eternal tools -- pretty expensive. The rest is home made. They may look rough and crusty, but that's just the non-acting surfaces. The far right one was an experiment (very easy to make), and is actually my go-to graver for hogging hard steel. It is very hard to damage.
    If you start using carbide gravers, you need to be reasonably adept at using normal gravers, since any mistake will chip the graver or snap the tip right off. You can regrind it of course, but that's more troublesome because of the diamond tooling.

     
  7. Like
    teegee got a reaction from Pip in Don't you just hate it when...   
    It seems I have been defeated so many times already that I don't even care anymore
    - Spent 5 hours making a new component, only to ruin it on the last operation? Just start over. The second time you can do it in 4 or 3 hours anyway. 
    - Bent hairspring by catching it on center wheel again? Learn to be more careful and spend 2 hours spring-tweaking under the microscope. Even more fun if it's a ladies watch.
    - Some part pings into oblivion? Scout for new one on ebay. I actually force myself to purchase a new (old) part as a form of self-punishment, even if the watch is not worth the expense (unless extreme, hehe). 
    One part of learning watchmaking is to stay calm in the face of soul-crushing defeat.
    A few days ago I assembled and cased an ETA 2824 in a miserable front-remove case. The watch ran great on the timing machine without the automatic module installed. I installed the module, closed the back and wore it for testing -- and it stopped after just a few minutes. I haven't quite figured out what's wrong, but if the ratchet driver wheel of the automatic module exerts pressure on the ratchet wheel, the wheel train loses power somewhere. Most likely there's something wrong with the barrel, or the intermediate wheel. So, start from scratch!
    Cheers!
         Rob
     
     
  8. Like
    teegee got a reaction from jdm in Don't you just hate it when...   
    It seems I have been defeated so many times already that I don't even care anymore
    - Spent 5 hours making a new component, only to ruin it on the last operation? Just start over. The second time you can do it in 4 or 3 hours anyway. 
    - Bent hairspring by catching it on center wheel again? Learn to be more careful and spend 2 hours spring-tweaking under the microscope. Even more fun if it's a ladies watch.
    - Some part pings into oblivion? Scout for new one on ebay. I actually force myself to purchase a new (old) part as a form of self-punishment, even if the watch is not worth the expense (unless extreme, hehe). 
    One part of learning watchmaking is to stay calm in the face of soul-crushing defeat.
    A few days ago I assembled and cased an ETA 2824 in a miserable front-remove case. The watch ran great on the timing machine without the automatic module installed. I installed the module, closed the back and wore it for testing -- and it stopped after just a few minutes. I haven't quite figured out what's wrong, but if the ratchet driver wheel of the automatic module exerts pressure on the ratchet wheel, the wheel train loses power somewhere. Most likely there's something wrong with the barrel, or the intermediate wheel. So, start from scratch!
    Cheers!
         Rob
     
     
  9. Like
    teegee reacted to rogart63 in Oil cups   
    Bought mine from cousinsuk . Works okay. And is a little cheaper on cousinsuk . Have tested the Bergeon so have nothing to compare  with. Have a small red Bregeon with agate and that works fine. 
  10. Like
    teegee reacted to Halvis in Oil cups   
    I do not recommend these.
    I noticed small particles in the oil, and on closer inspection I saw that it comes from the hinges. When opening and closing, the hinges grind away paint and material that ends up in the oil.

    But it is much nicer to use this kind of oil cups than the cheap plastic ones, so there is no going back now. I will invest in the original Bergeon version
  11. Like
    teegee got a reaction from rogart63 in Oil cups   
    Great, time to get a set
    Cousins is much more expensive at 35 UKP, plus shipping vs 28 USD including shipping on ebay. The proper bergeon one is 90 UKP, which is not even as much as I expected. The full metal one is 260 quid though, lol
  12. Thanks
    teegee got a reaction from VWatchie in Help needed to understand mainspring winders   
    I bought the what looks to be the same "Bergeon" set from a watch fair in Holland. The seller had even put a nice yellow Bergeon label on the box. It was a good deal and it works great, but it isn't a proper Bergeon. I don't particularly care, but I was kinda miffed that I fell for the scam.

    As others said, this only winds in one direction. Another problem with it is that the arbor sizes are rather large. I was trying to wind in a 2824 mainspring yesterday, and the winder arbor size was twice the diameter of the barrel arbor (and would completely stretch it). I wonder if a proper Bergeon set uses much thinner arbors.
    Sometimes I fall back on my trusty old winder, which has the benefit that it's much easier to make new arbors for. The hook on my new arbors allows winding in both directions. I've also drilled out the hook in existing winder arbors in the same set in order to replace them with a bidirectional variant. One of the arbors I made before was perfect for winding the 2824 spring. 
    I've added some pictures of the old set and new arbors below.
    Cheers!
          Rob

  13. Like
    teegee got a reaction from the1beard in Bergeon 5402 waterproof tester   
    Ah yes, I had to epoxy my corroded base, and I'll raise you one: don't use ethanol to clean the cylinder! I had formed the habit of using full-strength ethanol in place of rubbing alcohol, and about 2 seconds after rubbing a bit on the cylinder, huge cracks started forming. 
    Turns out that smart people know that acrylic and ethanol don't mix well..
    Luckily, I found a local acrylic seller that sold me 1m of matching pipe pretty cheaply, and I managed to replace it. Machining this stuff on my lathe was an absolute nightmare though, since it is incredibly grabby.


  14. Like
    teegee got a reaction from jdrichard in Help Cutting Threads on Stem   
    I've had the same set for years. Pretty much hit-and-miss when it comes to quality. I've bought a few separate dies and taps for the smallest three sizes, also on ebay. Even though more expensive, these were not necessarily any better, sigh.
     
  15. Like
    teegee got a reaction from jdm in Optics for repair work   
    I do the same as you, but I'd rather just use a loupe for general work. The microscope is great for inspection, oiling, cleaning, hairspring work etc. I made some extra attachments for the boom to be able to use it with the lathe, but I could not get used to it at all; it seemed to completely screw up my hand-eye coordination and muscle memory.. Some people seem to swear by it, so I may try again sometime in the future.
     
  16. Like
    teegee got a reaction from jdrichard in Bhi Distance Learning   
    Depending on where you live, they may be able to arrange an invigilator for you. I had to find one myself, which can be very difficult (I was lucky to have a professor friend at a local uni). Exams are never done remotely (i.e. skype or something), but only with an approved invigilator.
    For technician grade, you'd need the invigilator for D1 (theory) and D4 (quartz service).
    Year three exams have to be done at the BHI, which means I'm going back there next year
    Cheers,
        Rob
  17. Like
    teegee got a reaction from Michael in Bhi Distance Learning   
    Hah, I noticed the same at the awards ceremony last weekend (my first time there), but I knew that would likely be the case anyway. I think they're aware of their advanced average age, and they're very keen to attract younger members.
    I'm doing the DLC just because I have no other means to learn (besides internet and books), and I think it's a fun course. Like any education, there may be parts of it you don't like. I never had any interest in quartz watches and clocks, but discovered that high-end (non-junk) quartz watches are OK, and clocks are great. I had technical drafting nightmares from school days, but actually enjoyed CAD escapement drawing (year 2).
    And yes, the first few units are about metalworking skills. If you're already good at that, then it's easy for you, but the course targets beginners. If you never plan to make new parts at all then maybe this course it not for you. For the technician exams you will need to make a fictitious clock part.
    Did you ask the BHI for a few sample lessons? I do agree with you that it can be hard to find out detailed information about the DLC, exam procedures etc. I'm doing everything from afar, which makes the procedures (invigilator, etc) even more complicated.
    You mention £600, but that won't be enough. Exams are £120 apiece these days, and there's three for the technician grade.
    If you think you're good enough, you can always just start taking in customer work, and build up a critical mass of clients. Or buy, fix and sell watches on eBay. When you're established with a good reputation, nobody will care about your qualifications anyway.
    Cheers!
        Rob
  18. Like
    teegee got a reaction from rodabod in Mic adapter to connect Witschi to computer?   
    Would it really not have a preamp in the stand? Even my cheap Chinese timegrapher uses a preamp. You could still hook it up to a PC (I plan to try WOS as well), but you'd need some minimal external electronics to provide power to the pramp.
  19. Like
    teegee got a reaction from Pip in Bought myself a treat.   
    Best book ever -- you'll love it. I used to read it in the library before it was finally reprinted..
    I recently bought volume 1 and 2 of "Antique watch restoration" by Archie Perkins, which turned out to be the next best thing to Daniels. Very well written, excellent illustrations, etc.
  20. Like
    teegee got a reaction from jdm in Reina Automatic Watch Cleaning machine   
    Very nice looking machine! I'd imagine though that all the pumping of liquids is going to cause a lot more contamination of fluids, since you can never get all the liquid out of the main chamber by just pumping..
  21. Like
    teegee got a reaction from Don in Mainspring Winder   
    I use something like the one below. Works OK, but the one I have has too much slop between pusher and barrel. The inner hooking also only works in one direction, so I made some new arbors and modified some existing ones. These and other types can be found on ebay for not that much.
    Winding by hand may work, but is not a good way to go about. You'll have to wear finger cots to prevent touching the spring. The cots will get stuck between coils, etc. If you're not careful, you'll cone-shape the spring, or scratch the edges (more likely with old carbon steel springs). If you only do this three times per year, it may be an option.
    I pretty much find reinstalling the spring one of the most frustrating steps in assembling a watch. It doesn't help that I'm stupid and regularly end up winding the spring in the winder barrel in the wrong direction, which means start from scratch.

  22. Like
    teegee got a reaction from SSTEEL in Nice vice from Cousins   
    I have the same vise, pictured here with the world's most annoying copper jaw shoes. Rev. #2 will have clips on the side that fold over the back of the jaw. The vise screw binds a little when closing, but not enough to complain to Cousins about.
    Besides the normal bench mount, I also made up a holder for it out of a huge chunk of steel. It probably weighs 5kg or so, with cork stick on-pads as feet. That weight is just nice to keep the vise from slipping on the table, while it can still easily be rotated and moved. I have a slightly bigger vise for hacksawing etc.
    The weird T-slot construction was due lack of a proper T-slot cutter.. It wasn't a very fun project, since I bought the wrong type of steel chunk off-cut, with too high a carbon content (compared to mild steel). I think one end was plasma-cut, which left a super hard surface that destroyed a few HSS endmills before I realized what was going on.. A smarter person would have picked the non-hardened side to mill a slot in.


  23. Like
    teegee got a reaction from Hiren in Bhi Distance Learning   
    Hi Hiren,
    I'm in working on lesson 8 and 9 of year 1 now, and plan to do exams in May. The course is great, I'm loving it. The revamped year one material is infinitely better than the old version (which I did for a while, 15 years ago). So far, my marks (from the tutor) have been very good, but I won't be able to do anywhere as good on the exam, without references.
    The member's section on the BHI has been down for months unfortunately (groan), otherwise you could access the student board there.
    Cheers!
    Rob
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