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JohnR725

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  1. Thanks
    JohnR725 got a reaction from TheFixer in Epilame   
    I found some additional information you might find useful. 
    Then on page 7 of the PDF it talks about the application.
    http://www.moebius-lubricants.ch/en/products/epilames
    http://www.moebius-lubricants.ch/sites/default/files/security_sheet/tinf_8980-8981-8982_fixodrop_es-bs_en.pdf
    https://www.cousinsuk.com/document/search?SearchString=fixodrop
    BHI The Practical Lubrication of Clocks and Watches Version 2008.0.pdf
  2. Like
    JohnR725 reacted to yankeedog in Most Useless Watch Tool   
    I disagree with the premise.It has one use.so it is not useless..It would more correctly be called the least useful watch tool.
  3. Thanks
    JohnR725 got a reaction from Nucejoe in Jaeger-LeCoultre caliber P478 Help   
    If you're looking for watch lift angles the list below seems to be more complete than most. Your's is listed as 45°.
    https://www.lepsi.ch/lift-angle/
  4. Like
    JohnR725 reacted to Tmuir in Jaeger-LeCoultre caliber P478 Help   
    Welcome, you can find a bit of information about the movement here.
    http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&&2uswk&LeCoultre_478
    Sorry can't give you much more than that, but others may be able to.
  5. Thanks
    JohnR725 got a reaction from Asmobrat in Pallet Stone Wear   
    Your picture of the escape wheel reminded me of where are seen this before. Surface treating to prevent oil spreading is quite common unfortunately if it's not done correctly it can lead to problems like rust. For instance you can see examples of that at the link below.
     
    http://watchmakingblog.com/2011/07/29/one-hazard-of-epilame/
  6. Like
    JohnR725 reacted to Gpsluvr in Movado 976.001 battery issue   
    You can buy movements on eBay, but if I were you, I would scour the area with a magnet. It is gold plated steel, usually. Steve




    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
  7. Like
    JohnR725 reacted to nickelsilver in Question about poising   
    That's a pretty great rate, but there is a little error, more evident as would be expected at low amplitude. Just try out moving the spring in the direction to get it centered and see what the effect is. If it were me I would leave it, I would bet you are at a similar delta and overall rate as your full wind at 24h. Plus it's an auto so it spends most of it's life far from the 24h mark. But it looks like a very slight poise issue, and would require just a tiny removal of material.
    One problem with chasing "perfection" is every time you manipulate the balance, there's a risk of introducing a new error, from slightly tweeking the hairspring to a microscopic piece of dirt getting in a pivot, or on the roller jewel, or the lower pivot brushing the fork slot (oil on the slot), to a half a dozen other things. 7750 is pretty robust and tolerant, it's worse as you get smaller (0.06mm pivots can drive you to drink).
  8. Like
    JohnR725 got a reaction from jdm in Seiko skx007 regulating question   
    I thought you might find this interesting normally Seiko doesn't have much for technical specifications for the watches but if you look in the 4006 a service information step number 12 image attached. I was having a discussion with another watchmaker regarding Seiko's amplitude and he told me about this. He was like the rest of you concerned over amplitude but decided that Seiko designed them to have low amplitude.  There's nothing wrong with low amplitude as long as at the end of 24 hours the watch is still running and keeping time.
     

  9. Like
    JohnR725 got a reaction from StuartBaker104 in Oiling pallet pivots - would you ?   
    Horological lubrication is quite a fascinating subject. Unlike some things in watch repair that haven’t really changed in the last hundred years horological lubrication seems to always be changing. As this particular discussion demonstrates lubrication of the pallet fork pivots sometimes they do sometimes they don’t. Then the choice of lubrication’s typical responses look at the tech sheet. But the various watch companies typically all have differing recommendations and those recommendations almost always have changed with time.  Then there is the missing information such as surface treatment and other stuff. Or the assumption whoever’s reading a technical guide is a professional watchmaker that knows what they’re doing. Of course we all have our personal choices and thoughts on the subject which very likely could all be different.
    The original title of this discussion was lubrication of the pivots the pallet fork that generally is an easy subject in that it’s usually frowned upon at least by the Swiss. Oiling of the rest of the escapement can get quite interesting. This is where time is an interesting thing or when the technical sheets came into existence. For an example of this I pulled out a couple of older Swiss technical guides and the earlier one is recommending 9020 for the pallet stones. A couple years later they switch to 941. Then I don’t remember how many years before 9415 comes into existence but it will show up eventually. Then when it does its typically for the higher frequency watches as it stays in place better. But with time even on lower frequency of 18,000 BPH watches you’ll see either or recommendation. Currently everyone seems to going just to 9415.
    So did you think this was confusing at all? Did you wonder what I meant by missing information other than surface treatment? Omega’s an interesting company over the years they’ve had technical information separate from their normal technical guides. Working instruction number 40 is quite interesting for instance it’s on lubrication and I’ve attached the PDF to this message. I think you'll find starting on page 13 quite interesting..
     
     
    CousinsUK.com Omega 8645_WI_40_rules for lubrication.pdf
  10. Like
    JohnR725 got a reaction from Deggsie in Oiling pallet pivots - would you ?   
    9415 is an interesting lubrication? It's grease like so it stays in place except on impact where it becomes a very fluid extremely slippery. But if you're trying to get maximum amplitude you have to be careful not to apply too much or you will lose amplitude.
     
  11. Like
    JohnR725 got a reaction from mikepilk in Oiling pallet pivots - would you ?   
    Horological lubrication is quite a fascinating subject. Unlike some things in watch repair that haven’t really changed in the last hundred years horological lubrication seems to always be changing. As this particular discussion demonstrates lubrication of the pallet fork pivots sometimes they do sometimes they don’t. Then the choice of lubrication’s typical responses look at the tech sheet. But the various watch companies typically all have differing recommendations and those recommendations almost always have changed with time.  Then there is the missing information such as surface treatment and other stuff. Or the assumption whoever’s reading a technical guide is a professional watchmaker that knows what they’re doing. Of course we all have our personal choices and thoughts on the subject which very likely could all be different.
    The original title of this discussion was lubrication of the pivots the pallet fork that generally is an easy subject in that it’s usually frowned upon at least by the Swiss. Oiling of the rest of the escapement can get quite interesting. This is where time is an interesting thing or when the technical sheets came into existence. For an example of this I pulled out a couple of older Swiss technical guides and the earlier one is recommending 9020 for the pallet stones. A couple years later they switch to 941. Then I don’t remember how many years before 9415 comes into existence but it will show up eventually. Then when it does its typically for the higher frequency watches as it stays in place better. But with time even on lower frequency of 18,000 BPH watches you’ll see either or recommendation. Currently everyone seems to going just to 9415.
    So did you think this was confusing at all? Did you wonder what I meant by missing information other than surface treatment? Omega’s an interesting company over the years they’ve had technical information separate from their normal technical guides. Working instruction number 40 is quite interesting for instance it’s on lubrication and I’ve attached the PDF to this message. I think you'll find starting on page 13 quite interesting..
     
     
    CousinsUK.com Omega 8645_WI_40_rules for lubrication.pdf
  12. Like
    JohnR725 got a reaction from jdm in Oiling pallet pivots - would you ?   
    Horological lubrication is quite a fascinating subject. Unlike some things in watch repair that haven’t really changed in the last hundred years horological lubrication seems to always be changing. As this particular discussion demonstrates lubrication of the pallet fork pivots sometimes they do sometimes they don’t. Then the choice of lubrication’s typical responses look at the tech sheet. But the various watch companies typically all have differing recommendations and those recommendations almost always have changed with time.  Then there is the missing information such as surface treatment and other stuff. Or the assumption whoever’s reading a technical guide is a professional watchmaker that knows what they’re doing. Of course we all have our personal choices and thoughts on the subject which very likely could all be different.
    The original title of this discussion was lubrication of the pivots the pallet fork that generally is an easy subject in that it’s usually frowned upon at least by the Swiss. Oiling of the rest of the escapement can get quite interesting. This is where time is an interesting thing or when the technical sheets came into existence. For an example of this I pulled out a couple of older Swiss technical guides and the earlier one is recommending 9020 for the pallet stones. A couple years later they switch to 941. Then I don’t remember how many years before 9415 comes into existence but it will show up eventually. Then when it does its typically for the higher frequency watches as it stays in place better. But with time even on lower frequency of 18,000 BPH watches you’ll see either or recommendation. Currently everyone seems to going just to 9415.
    So did you think this was confusing at all? Did you wonder what I meant by missing information other than surface treatment? Omega’s an interesting company over the years they’ve had technical information separate from their normal technical guides. Working instruction number 40 is quite interesting for instance it’s on lubrication and I’ve attached the PDF to this message. I think you'll find starting on page 13 quite interesting..
     
     
    CousinsUK.com Omega 8645_WI_40_rules for lubrication.pdf
  13. Thanks
    JohnR725 got a reaction from Asmobrat in Oiling pallet pivots - would you ?   
    Horological lubrication is quite a fascinating subject. Unlike some things in watch repair that haven’t really changed in the last hundred years horological lubrication seems to always be changing. As this particular discussion demonstrates lubrication of the pallet fork pivots sometimes they do sometimes they don’t. Then the choice of lubrication’s typical responses look at the tech sheet. But the various watch companies typically all have differing recommendations and those recommendations almost always have changed with time.  Then there is the missing information such as surface treatment and other stuff. Or the assumption whoever’s reading a technical guide is a professional watchmaker that knows what they’re doing. Of course we all have our personal choices and thoughts on the subject which very likely could all be different.
    The original title of this discussion was lubrication of the pivots the pallet fork that generally is an easy subject in that it’s usually frowned upon at least by the Swiss. Oiling of the rest of the escapement can get quite interesting. This is where time is an interesting thing or when the technical sheets came into existence. For an example of this I pulled out a couple of older Swiss technical guides and the earlier one is recommending 9020 for the pallet stones. A couple years later they switch to 941. Then I don’t remember how many years before 9415 comes into existence but it will show up eventually. Then when it does its typically for the higher frequency watches as it stays in place better. But with time even on lower frequency of 18,000 BPH watches you’ll see either or recommendation. Currently everyone seems to going just to 9415.
    So did you think this was confusing at all? Did you wonder what I meant by missing information other than surface treatment? Omega’s an interesting company over the years they’ve had technical information separate from their normal technical guides. Working instruction number 40 is quite interesting for instance it’s on lubrication and I’ve attached the PDF to this message. I think you'll find starting on page 13 quite interesting..
     
     
    CousinsUK.com Omega 8645_WI_40_rules for lubrication.pdf
  14. Thanks
    JohnR725 got a reaction from Nucejoe in Oiling pallet pivots - would you ?   
    It's generally frowned upon to oil the pallet fork pivots. If you put the watch on a timing machine before and after you will usually see a small decrease in amplitude. If with time the lubrication gets more sticky that decrease of amplitude will be more dramatic.
    Seiko as mentioned above does recommend oiling the pivots sort of? If you go through their tech sheets sometimes they do sometimes they don't. The other strange thing for Seiko is if you have multiple generations of service sheets even for a particular caliber sometimes they do sometimes they don't and unfortunately they do not explain why.
  15. Like
    JohnR725 got a reaction from adiorio110 in HELP!!! Screwed up my 2892-A2   
    If you look at the manufacturing information document it specifies that a serial number is placed on the mainspring barrel bridge which is what you have which means this is a chronometer grade movement. Then of course the 2892A2 Is the base movement. The other number is usually a date code possibly a location and a date code of where the movement was manufactured.
    When the watch is on the timing machine is it entirely reassembled? when you're having a problem like this I wouldn't put the automatic back on or any of the calendar components until  you getting something decent on the timing machine.
     
  16. Thanks
    JohnR725 got a reaction from Ascanio in Omega 565 rotor bearing   
    if you read the technical document found above you'll notice on page 3 there is reference to another document? This is the document you need which explains how to fix the problem of the new weight becoming stuck if it's not properly adjusted. The only problem is you're not going to have the tools. But in the absence of lacking of the proper tools I'm extracting out the text that you will find interesting
    "The new oscillating weight becomes stuck if it is not adjusted to the stud (pin). The new studs designed for the oscillating weight in the calibre 550 family are 0.698 to 0.701 mm in diameter."
    The reamer is described as "Hard metal precision reamer Diameter 0,702 mm Reference 516 0072" then even if you can find the reamer you need the spindle that holds it in the staking set. So what we get out of this is the axle is over size and you need to open the hole to 0,702 mm. I would suggest not using the old parts just replace both of them. then if you're careful you can use watchweasol instructions with a brooch which will work just be careful it's easy to go too far.
     
  17. Thanks
    JohnR725 got a reaction from yankeedog in seiko question   
    My reading skills totally suck I didn't notice the letter C and you're right that changes the answer totally. So the correct cross reference should look like this.
    0310197
     BALANCE COMPLETE WITH STUD
     SEK 7S26C      21 JEWELS
     SEK 7S36C
     
     
  18. Thanks
    JohnR725 got a reaction from yankeedog in seiko question   
    0310020
     BALANCE COMPLETE
     721/1909
      BLF 12G1B2      21600 BPH-17JL-AUTO-CALD
     JUB 1201     
     JUB 1202     
     PUL Y621     
     QUA 12G1B2      21,600 BPH-17JL-AUTO-CALENDAR
     SEK 7001A      17 JL-21,600 BPH-DSS-AUTO
     SEK 7002A     
     SEK 7005A      21,600 BPH-17 JL-SHOCK-DSS-AUTO-CALENDAR
     SEK 7006A      21,600 BPH-17 & 21 JL (19 JL)-DSS-AUTO-CALD(DAY DATE)
     SEK 7009A      21,600 BPH-17 JL-SHOCK-DSS-AUTO-CAL. (DAY DATE)
     SEK 7015A      21600 BPH 21JL AUTO CHRONO CALD (DAY/DATE)
     SEK 7016A      17JL 21600BPH CHRONO AUTO CALD DAY DATE
     SEK 7017A      21JL 21600 BPH AUTO CHRONO CALENDAR (DAY/DATE) SHOCK ADJ STD
     SEK 7018A      21600 BPH 23JL AUTO CHRONO CAL (DAY/DATE) ADJ STUD HOLD
     SEK 7018B      23JL 21600 BPH CHRONO AUTO CALD (DAY/DATE)
     SEK 7019A      21,600 BPH 21 JL DSS AUTO CAL (DAY-DATE)
     SEK 7025A      21,600 BPH-SHOCK-17 JL-DSS-AUTO-CALD W/CORR-ADJ STUD H
     SEK 7S26A     
     SEK 7S36A      SEE TECH GUIDE FOR DESCRIPTIONS OF DAY DIALS
     UTC 37      21,600 BPH 17JL DSS AUTO CAL
     UTC 38      21600 BPH-DSS-AUTO-CALD (DAY/DATE)-SHOCK
     WCX A331-1      21,600 BPH-17 JL-SHOCK-DSS-AUTO-CALENDAR
     WCX A361-1      21,600 BPH-17-19-21 JL-DSS-AUTO-CALD-(DAY-DATE) SHOCK
  19. Like
    JohnR725 reacted to aac58 in seiko question   
    Part # of Balance complete with stud for 7S26C is 0310197 and for 7009 is 310 020, so I'm afraid they are not compatible.
     
    However the balance in 7S26A is 310 020, so it is the same than in 7009.
  20. Like
    JohnR725 got a reaction from Johnnie in Expired Oil   
    It's always best if you're going to change the subject to start a new discussion as you have a greater audience to answer your question.
  21. Thanks
    JohnR725 got a reaction from Nucejoe in What am I? Ingersoll or Trenton or ?   
    Unfortunately it's not quite that simple as vinn3 As pointed out above. I don't know enough about the watch company in question but a lot of the watch companies sold their movements separate. You'd go to a jewelry store the movements would be in one case the cases would be another case. They did not come together. Not to say that they couldn't come together because often times the watch companies did case their watches up. Then through time watches get swapped in their cases. A lot of times you can tell that if you look where the screws go for holding it in the case they'll be additional marks where others screws were.
    So what we do get is we know when the case was made. If you can find data that the company purchased their cases from Denison then all of this becomes much much more important. But even though it does give you some dates the case seems about the right time for the watch it's just another clue or breadcrumb to follow on your trail to.
  22. Thanks
    JohnR725 got a reaction from Nucejoe in What am I? Ingersoll or Trenton or ?   
    In one of the other discussions of this watch you had a link to your Google drive with photographs. What makes the photographs interesting is the case? So I have a link to an article about the case making company. Then the case has marks on it like a British case or in this case a Birmingham case. Then one of the letters is a date code Which dates it is 1908 or 1909.
     
    http://www.vintagewatchstraps.com/blogdennison.php
  23. Like
    JohnR725 reacted to nickelsilver in Expired Oil   
    I would expect to get oil/grease with enough shelf life to make it usable, if buying new, for example I have 9415 I bought last year that expires in 2022, some Fixodrop I just bought that is good til 2021. The 9415 will almost certainly be barely half used by 2022.
    Prior to the application of expiration dates I don't think anyone gave it much thought. I know a very fastidious pro who had a policy of changing the oil in his cups once a week at least, and replacing oil bottles that had been opened once a year. Makes sense in that the oil cups are quite exposed, and an opened bottle that has been dipped into dozens of times will almost certainly be somewhat contaminated regardless of how careful one is.All that said, I truly believe that sealed lubricant is good indefinitely, and you have nothing to worry about. There are many fans of the old Elgin m56b oil, which hasn't been produced in 40-50 years.
  24. Like
    JohnR725 got a reaction from watchweasol in Weird timegrapher reading   
    I snipped out a section of your balance wheel hairspring image. It appears to be somebody has re- pinned your hairspring? Re-pinning the hairspring where they have versus the end where it probably should have been will make your watch go a lot faster.

  25. Like
    JohnR725 got a reaction from nickelsilver in Weird timegrapher reading   
    I snipped out a section of your balance wheel hairspring image. It appears to be somebody has re- pinned your hairspring? Re-pinning the hairspring where they have versus the end where it probably should have been will make your watch go a lot faster.

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