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WillFly

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  1. Like
    WillFly got a reaction from Craig in Happy Days...(Hopefully)   
    Looks interesting - I hope it's the real deal. I know very little about Omegas but always willing to learn.
  2. Like
    WillFly got a reaction from Craig in Speed Cleaning!   
    Spotted on eBay this afternoon, two additional pieces of information added by the seller of a Sekonda chronograph:
     
    On 04-Feb-14 at 14:44:05 GMT, seller added the following information:
    sometimes the seconds hand stops at 12 i am not gonna do anything to it but the watch keeps perfect time all other dials work perfectly 
    On 04-Feb-14 at 15:43:31 GMT, seller added the following information:
    the watch has been cleaned by an expert now and is working fine all round
     
    So - the watch had been cleaned by an expert - in just one hour!
     
    Mark, Mark, you'd better shape up, mate... :lolu:
  3. Like
    WillFly got a reaction from Craig in Wristwatch Screw Case Remover - Any Suggestions?   
    Ah - microscopes. My father worked in a laboratory for most of his life and would bring home microscopes and glass slides for us kids to use for fun at weekends. I remember my first fly!
  4. Like
    WillFly got a reaction from Craig in Ebay And What To Look For   
    I don't think it's a fake. There were plenty of these made in many varying styles. The dial and the case look authentic, as does  the movement. I think the starting price is a little on the high side, personally. The postage is £10 - and don't forget that you'll almost certainly have to pay customs duty when you collect it from your local Royal Mail depot - because it won't be delivered to your door until the duty has been paid.
     
    So, my very amateur view is: it seems OK but I'd look out for one in Europe before going for one in the US/Philippines, etc. I never buy expensive things from the States - I stick to things like specialist mainsprings! If there is a problem, it's not easy to sort out at that distance.
  5. Like
    WillFly got a reaction from Craig in Ebay And What To Look For   
    This one looks nice - not a Daymaster, but a good looking item all the same... Bit more pricey, but a nice looker.
     
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Early-70s-Vintage-RADO-NEW-GOLDEN-HORSE-AUTOMATIC-25J-ETA-CAL-2789-WATCH-/161205011709?pt=UK_Jewelery_Watches_Watches_MensWatches_GL&hash=item25889144fd
  6. Like
    WillFly got a reaction from Craig in "railroad Grade" Pocket Watches   
    "Railroad grade" is a term that you often see applied to pocket watches - sometimes just "railroad" or "railways" is used - with the implication that these watches were suitable for use by guards, stationmasters, drivers, etc., on (mainly) American railways. It's used a lot on eBay as an extra attraction in the sale of a pocket watch - and quite often wrongly, whether by accident or design is often impossible to tell. So, here's some very basic info on "RR" grade watches and what to look out for.
     
    There's a bit of a myth about a late 19th century train crash in America which led directly to the setting up of a national standard for railroad timepieces - but this is part of the story. Without going into details, Webb C. Ball, an engineer and watchmaker, was appointed to set up a commission on watch standards. His company didn't actually make watches, but it certified the movements of other companies as being fir for railroad purpose - hence watches called "Ball-Waltham", "Ball-Hamilton", etc. (The modern Ball company bears no relation to the original Ball other than the name).
     
    The commission agreed that railroad grade watches should have the following characteristics:
     
    1. The dial should be open-face - no hunters or half-hunters.
    2. The hands should be set by a lever under the bezel - no accidental changing of time when winding.
    3. There should be at least 17 jewels to the movement - 19 and above were more commonly used.
    4. The dial should be white with black, clear Arabic numerals - no Roman numerals.
    5. The movement should be fitted with a double roller.
    6. The movement should be adjusted for isochronism and at least 5 positions.
     
    One later form of dial was the "Montgomery" - which had the minutes in numerals and a 24-hour chapter ring as well. Not all RR watches had Montgomery dials and not all watches with Montgomery dials are RR grade! So - the next time you see a watch advertised on eBay as a railway watch, be extra vigilant. Ask for the serial number on the movement and then go to this database:
     
    http://pocketwatchdatabase.com/
     
    I have my Hamilton 992 on today - pics in another thread - and the serial number of that watch is: 2320829. If you check that number in the database, you'll see all it's basic technical spec - and whether it's RR grade or not!
  7. Like
    WillFly got a reaction from Craig in "railroad Grade" Pocket Watches   
    There's a huge amount more to be said - by people who know more about it than me, I can assure you! For example, there's a subtle difference between "railroad grade" and "railroad approved"... The watches made by Hamilton, Elgin, Waltham, etc., could be cased and regulated by the Ball Watch Company and become "approved" (Ball-Waltham and so on). These firms also made watches of the same grade as the official approved watches which, though not having the Ball seal of approval, were used both as railroad watches and domestic watches - railroad grade, in fact. The approved Ball watch wasn't compulsory, and the various railroad companies occasionally adopted varying standards - particularly in the earlier years - so it wasn't all set in stone.
     
    I collect them because they're beautiful works of art and superb engineering. I believe that, in their day, they were some of the most accurate timepieces to be found anywhere in the world, but that's just a personal reflection. Here's an early example from 1903 - a Waltham Vanguard with 23 jewels:
     

     

  8. Like
    WillFly got a reaction from Craig in Adjusting For Isochronism And Positions   
    Error between dial up and dial down: The balance staff pivots are most likely at fault. Either bent or require rounding (speeds up) flattening (slows down)
     
    Ah - I've had two three watches where the movement runs like a train face down, but runs slow or even stops when face up...
  9. Like
    WillFly got a reaction from Craig in Waistcoat And Hamilton Today   
    My uncle by marriage was a watch repairer and jeweller and, as a young man, used to work in the watch repairi section of the Co-operative store in Bolton (Lancashire). When I was about 8 or 9, he occasionally took me on a Saturday morning into the workshop. This place fascinated me - in those days (early 1950s), watch repairing wasn't just changing a battery! In fact he gave me my first wristwatch when I passed the 11+ - if memory serves, it was a Kienzle. Fast forward to about 10 years ago when I was given a J.G. Graves "English Lever Movement" silver-cased pocket watch by the widow of a neighbour. These watches were, and still are, pretty bog-standard but nice movements - you can generally find one on eBay. Through another, non-watch forum, I made friends with a generous chap in the US who collected railroad watches. He gave me, as a present, an Elgin 571 "B.W. Raymond" RR grade watch in a rather worn case. I was so pleased with this watch that I started to look for my own. And thus the mania grew! :phew:
  10. Like
    WillFly got a reaction from Craig in Today? I Fancy A 1960S Enicar...   
    At the moment I have:
     
    15 American mechanical hand-wound pocket watches, of which 11 are Railroad Grade and the rest 3 are US military with a 4th UK military with an American (Elgin) movement.
     
    15 mechanical hand-wound wristwatches: 4 Roamer, 3 Hamiltons (1 with a Swiss ETA 6497 movement), 3 Wittnauer, 1 Enicar, 1 Elgin, 1 Paul Jobin, 1 Longines, 1 Smiths. All pre-1970 with the exception of the Swiss Hamilton.
     
    2 modern quartz watches: 1 Certina DS Podium chronograph and a Seiko Solar.
  11. Like
    WillFly got a reaction from atimegoneby in My Hamilton 980 From 1947   
    I love old American watches. Here's my 1947 Hamilton:
     

     

  12. Like
    WillFly got a reaction from Geo in Time And Motion - My Bunn Special As A Drum Machine...   
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dthD3gOfksU
     
    Speaks for itself... :jig:
  13. Like
    WillFly got a reaction from Craig in Mechanical Or Quartz   
    I have two quartz watches - one solar powered - and all the other 30+ are hand-wound. Expensive quartz movements can be very sophisticated, but - for me - there's nothing like looking at a beautiful mechanical movement.
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