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CaptCalvin

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  1. Thanks
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from deathkei in Please help to correct Daily rate.   
    Well it should be simple enough to get it to 0~+5 on the wrist. You sync the time to a reference and wear the watch for something like a week. Then you calculate average seconds gained/lost per day for the period you wore it. If the watch gained/lost you subtract/add the average gained/lost per day from whatever the timegraph displays and that would be your target rate to regulate to. 
    For example I wear the watch and at the end of the week I find that it had gained 35 seconds. I divide 35 by 7 and get 5 which means it gained on average 5 seconds a day. I wind it up fully and put it on the timegraph dial down and it reads +2. I subtract 5 from 2 which gets me -3. Now I regulate it so that it reads -3 dial down on timegraph and see where that gets me. Unless your wearing habits change significantly from week to week too much consideration need not be placed on wearing habits because all that would already be factored in.
  2. Thanks
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from deathkei in Please help to correct Daily rate.   
    Wait you mentioned that the rate suddenly increased? How are we forgetting the most obvious approach to this problem? Try hitting it with the demagnetizer!
  3. Like
    CaptCalvin reacted to nickelsilver in mesh netting   
    Pretty much every cleaning machine that spins has some sort baffle in the jar, sometimes in the bottom sometimes up the side, keeps the fluids from sloshing around too much.
  4. Like
    CaptCalvin reacted to nickelsilver in mesh netting   
    Does the Zenith have square jars? They don't necessarily need it. 
  5. Like
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from Deggsie in Seiko 6R15 Service Walk-Through   
    Amscope distributes decent ones very affordably. Nonetheless he did it with a 10x loupe, so microscope not an absolute necessity, just makes things easier. An escape pivot is the fastest moving pivot in the train. Even the 3rd wheel in my experience usage of thicker oil like 9104 or even a little too much 9010 can cause a 50 degree decrease in amplitude. Depending on the type or amount of contamination it's not inconceivable that dirty jewels can cause a drop of 100 degrees. These movements may have beginner cost, but I would not consider them beginner movements to make run decently. 
  6. Like
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from Mudos in Regulating a womens Tissot PR50   
    Actually tissot does like to use those red gaskets to hold the caseback in much the same way as most crystals are held in place: not with a lip, but with only friction. You might want to consider replacing that gasket. 
  7. Thanks
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from matabog in Mainspring winder mystery accessories   
    Diameter 2.45mm

  8. Thanks
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from Nucejoe in Understanding timing report   
    Poor lubrication can stop a watch. Would need dismantling and inspecting to say if anything needs more work other than lubrication. Perfectly fine running watches can produce these kinds of traces at very low amplitudes. Beat error and amplitude reading mean nothing with a trace like that.
  9. Like
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from vinn3 in Rinse baths   
    Forgot to mention that in my tour of the Patek facility I found that they use isopropyl alcohol as a final rinse as well.
  10. Like
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from burnsthewatchcollector in Can you align the minute and hour hand by pushing them into place?   
    Definitely hold the crown and don't hold the hour hand if you're going to try to take this shortcut. Depending on how tight the hands are you are liable to damage the tiny and delicate pinion leaves on the minute wheel that drive the hour wheel.
  11. Like
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from burnsthewatchcollector in Can you align the minute and hour hand by pushing them into place?   
    If you tried just pushing on the hands to get them to sync better chances are when you push the minute hand the hour hand will just move accordingly. You'd just in essence be setting the time, but doing so through the hands like you would on many old clocks as opposed to setting through the crown. Hands would need to come off and refitted. 
  12. Like
    CaptCalvin reacted to saswatch88 in Citizen 8110a chronograph lubrication   
    https://www.thewatchsite.com/14-user-manual-technical-manual-casing-guide-
    Some links to manuals which will have lubrication instructions, and video which is split in many parts shows where to oil but in a different language, you should peruse them.
    downloads/171138-1971-citizen-technical-information.html
    https://www.nodevice.com/service-manuals/watch/citizen/8110-1#lang-en
     
  13. Like
    CaptCalvin reacted to clockboy in Citizen 8110a chronograph lubrication   
    Personally I very rarely look at lubrication charts or even movement drawings. Lubrication is a personal preference item. I use mainly the moebius HP series of oils with 9010 for the cap jewels. I have had no issues using his method. 
  14. Like
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from Alaskamick in Watch Adjustment   
    Entire books can be written on the topic. But quick and dirty of it is that the screws closest to the cuts in the rim would be used to adjust for temperature.
  15. Like
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from Alaskamick in Watch Adjustment   
    A perfectly poised balance wheel is only the most basic step to start positional adjustment. If all you need is a poised balance wheel then stating the number of positions adjusted is irrelevant. Most of the work is done at the hairspring. Introducing poise errors to the balance wheel to counteract errors caused by the hairspring is not an ideal solution because these manipulations would have variable effects at different amplitudes. Such method should only be done to take out small errors after the balance is perfectly poised to begin with and hairspring adjusted to as close as you can.
  16. Like
    CaptCalvin reacted to Klassiker in Seiko 6R15 Service Walk-Through   
    I went with b in the end, after getting terrible amplitude which I mentioned in another post. As you say, not too difficult, because you can work one side in first, hold it steady about halfway engaged, the push the opposite side down and across into the slot. Then rotate the whole thing to the centre. I used a x10 lupe. One of the jewel holes was dirty, so well worth the effort.
  17. Like
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from nickelsilver in Raymond Weil eta 2824 cleaned now has problems.   
    No aerobic class. Just regular university classes. Around 20 minutes of walking in total to and from classes every Monday to Thursday. Especially sedentary Friday to Sunday. Watch worn all day every day, set down at night because I dislike solid objects of any kind in my sleeping area. 50 year old 2824 running in full health at 310 amplitude and 4 seconds positional delta serviced by yours truly. Had not hand wound it for the half year that I've worn it and always found it to be fully wound whenever I do the spring slip check except for in the mornings. Watch never stopped. Hand winding unnecessary and aerobics class completely unnecessary.
  18. Like
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from Nucejoe in Raymond Weil eta 2824 cleaned now has problems.   
    I don't think that's true. If you wear a 2824 for a day from fully unwound state motion alone should wind it adequately, certainly enough to accumulate enough power reserve to last overnight. He said he's never had this problem in the 10 years he's had it. Why would he suddenly change his habits right after the service? It looks to me the most plausible variable here is the service itself. 
  19. Like
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from jdm in Raymond Weil eta 2824 cleaned now has problems.   
    I don't think that's true. If you wear a 2824 for a day from fully unwound state motion alone should wind it adequately, certainly enough to accumulate enough power reserve to last overnight. He said he's never had this problem in the 10 years he's had it. Why would he suddenly change his habits right after the service? It looks to me the most plausible variable here is the service itself. 
  20. Like
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from Nucejoe in Raymond Weil eta 2824 cleaned now has problems.   
    How does the hand winding feel? Does the rotor spin when hand winding?
  21. Like
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from Nucejoe in Raymond Weil eta 2824 cleaned now has problems.   
    I'm more inclined to think improperly serviced automatic works. Perhaps improperly lubricated reversing wheels?
  22. Confused
    CaptCalvin reacted to saswatch88 in Raymond Weil eta 2824 cleaned now has problems.   
    In order for an automatic to run for longer periods or to its full potential it needs to start with a full wind. Not sure what the watch went through in the last 10 years but it sounds like the movement is operating as it should. It could have been in the last 10 years it started with a full wind and he consistently wore it for 10 years? Or did he ever manually wind it? Did he always wear it when sleeping? If so how many times in 10 years? These questions may not have answers but could explain the difference. Movement is def a big part of the winding process in an auto watch, it is within it self a form of winding, which is why they sell automatic winding watch cases. So by not manually winding and not wearing it while sleeping and purposely leaving sitting for long periods to see what the reserve is will all play a part in this.
  23. Thanks
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from Klassiker in Seiko 6R15 help with fault diagnosis   
    I use purpose made watch cleaning fluids and rinse fluids. I find these to be the most effective. In any case I find properly disassembly and cleaning of the 3rd and escape shock assemblies to be an indispensable step. In my experience Japanese movements are especially sensitive to proper cleaning and lubrication so you'll want to get every nook and crany. I do achieve around 300 amplitude with these but only after very meticulous cleaning and precise oiling.
  24. Like
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from watchweasol in Does this hairspring look good to you?   
    No. You would only expect hairspring to expand evenly on all sides if it has an overcoil. On a flat hairspring like this only the side opposite the stud and index would really expand.
  25. Like
    CaptCalvin got a reaction from Chopin in Does this hairspring look good to you?   
    No. You would only expect hairspring to expand evenly on all sides if it has an overcoil. On a flat hairspring like this only the side opposite the stud and index would really expand.
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