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saswatch88

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  1. Like
    saswatch88 reacted to m1ks in Beat error shows as high, on good working watches.   
    The weishi timegraphers are great but not infallible.
    Don't assume that the readings are definitely correct until you've established all other factors with the running of the watch are.
    Disregarding the 9.9ms reading currently. (This essentially is as relevant as it reading out of limits). There's a notable rise and drop in b.e. (where you see the lines separate).
    Very first thing I'd suggest is remove the balance and check that the roller jewel is centred and secure, I've seen similar results with a loose roller jewel. Still tight enough to fit but with a bit of side to side play.
    If that is shellac ed securely. Check the lock and drop of the pallet fork jewels and their security of fit, Check the swing between guard pins is even. (I've seen so many old pocket watches with bent guard pins it's almost become an expected sight).
    Check that the roller jewel is centering after a gentle rotation in both directions, check the hairspring is securely pinned and it's flat and reasonably concentric.
    Double check this with the balance installed viewed dial up. Dial down and pendant up etc.
    If your phone has a slow motion video facility. (Most do these days). Take a short clip of the balance and visually verify that it is oscillating roughly at the amplitude shown. Again don't assume it is 216 degrees, I've seen watches barely pushing 160 where the timegrapher reports a much higher amplitude.
    I know a chunk of this is repeated from the above good pointers but assuming you've checked all that and jewels are secured, endshake and side shake are OK, motion is acceptable and hs are OK then this should see a consistent line gap and a b.e. of 3.0 ish ms at the most.
    Also be sure to check the timegrapher reading with the watch on other positions especially the love you checked the roller jewel visually in, DD? I'd assume. See if there's a noticeable difference.
     
  2. Like
    saswatch88 got a reaction from Jon in Beat error shows as high, on good working watches.   
    Double post i realized i said 30 degrees but to be actual it should be 60 degrees. This is very tricky stuff and hard to translate to an actual escapement, but with high magnification and a good eye it can be done without any actual measuring.


  3. Thanks
    saswatch88 got a reaction from PaulnKC in How to open this old Benrus...   
    This is a typical benrus case they been making these since the 40s. You have to remove the crystal using a brass jaw type crystal remover. Once it’s out you have to separate the split stem. I could explain how to do it but a video is much easier and there are plenty out there. Just do a search on the net “ how to remove a split stem” and there is a tutorial on Esslinger.com on how to use the crystal remover.
    https://blog.esslinger.com/how-to-replace-a-watch-crystal/?_ga=2.79089757.839292711.1581400550-1065094695.1581400550
    what i will suggest is to use a wire cutting plier and go from the outside of the case not between the movement and the case to avoid damage. Do not pry just allow the tapered shanks of the pliers to pull it as you close down. You may need to do pull it a bit yourself just make sure you pull straight don’t wiggle or pry. It may take some force so don’t be shy with it.
    do not push on the crystal and remove crystal before separating the stem
  4. Like
    saswatch88 got a reaction from Deggsie in Correct method for increasing end-shake.   
    Look for mainspring that has metric size on package but most should have both Dennison and metric like Samson springs.
  5. Like
    saswatch88 got a reaction from Deggsie in Correct method for increasing end-shake.   
    that is true... this caliber had a version with 2 cap jewels for the escape, which is why i think someone must have had their hands in it before replacing the wrong escape wheel. Which would explain why this would be happening before the OP touched it. You can find these AS movements all over the bay. Same parts are interchangeable from one caliber to the next. i would try sourcing a parts movement before messing with jewels and pivots. The ranfft link below will list similar calibers. After doing an ebay search there plenty of 1187 watches, movements, and parts available since it happened to be a very popular movement during the time.
    http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&0&2uswk&AS_1187
  6. Thanks
    saswatch88 got a reaction from Springster in Which Cleaner to Use   
    Don’t use alcohol on pallets and balance if you do just dip then dry, but it’s good for a final rinse. A dry cleaner which is used for electrical is best for balance and fork it’s safe on shellac. For cleaning I like naphtha just make sure you dry it quickly preferably with heated air like a blow dryer it will leave less residue. Get some pegwood and nylon brushes to do some hand cleaning. Also rodico is a must have for cleaning pinions wheels and sopping up excess oil.
  7. Like
    saswatch88 reacted to nickelsilver in Correct method for increasing end-shake.   
    That's an odd situation, especially as there's a full bridge across the train, not just a little cock. A cock can get tilted either intentionally or by accident, a bridge that size not really. There's no simple way to increase the endshake there, aside from shortening one of the pivots.
  8. Like
    saswatch88 got a reaction from vinn3 in Correct method for increasing end-shake.   
    how was it behaving before you dis-assembled it? if it was the same then it could be any number of things, wrong jewels replaced, wrong escape wheel, jewels inserted wrong, bent bridge etc. if it started after you touched it then it may be something you did, but just to understand it runs fine without cap jewels installed? Dig you peg the jewel hole and maybe accidentally push the stone too far in? you can try using penetrating oil and gently pushing the cap jewel out a bit, just make sure you re-clean them afterwards. also do you have a pic of the entire movement?
  9. Like
    saswatch88 reacted to gary17 in longines   
    Thanks very much SAS you are correct.
  10. Like
    saswatch88 got a reaction from Deggsie in Correct method for increasing end-shake.   
    how was it behaving before you dis-assembled it? if it was the same then it could be any number of things, wrong jewels replaced, wrong escape wheel, jewels inserted wrong, bent bridge etc. if it started after you touched it then it may be something you did, but just to understand it runs fine without cap jewels installed? Dig you peg the jewel hole and maybe accidentally push the stone too far in? you can try using penetrating oil and gently pushing the cap jewel out a bit, just make sure you re-clean them afterwards. also do you have a pic of the entire movement?
  11. Like
    saswatch88 got a reaction from JohnR725 in Correct method for increasing end-shake.   
    how was it behaving before you dis-assembled it? if it was the same then it could be any number of things, wrong jewels replaced, wrong escape wheel, jewels inserted wrong, bent bridge etc. if it started after you touched it then it may be something you did, but just to understand it runs fine without cap jewels installed? Dig you peg the jewel hole and maybe accidentally push the stone too far in? you can try using penetrating oil and gently pushing the cap jewel out a bit, just make sure you re-clean them afterwards. also do you have a pic of the entire movement?
  12. Like
    saswatch88 got a reaction from watchweasol in How to clean vintage silver watch dial with green rust/stain like this   
    Yes but its organic acids lactic and gluconic and its heavily diluted with water, using straight up vinegar will most likely instantly remove the lettering. You can dilute these acids but i dont trust my mix of water to acid ratios and I wouldn’t recommend it to the OP. For $6 a pint its already pre-mixed ready to go and hasn’t failed me yet. I have also used these products on radium lumed dials without any issues with the lume afterwards. I attached an example. I wish i had a before pic with dial out the yellow crystal hides all the lime that was on the surface.
    With all that being said, this is a varnished dial and since there is ink on it so there isn’t  many alternatives here without having to reprint. But with the CLR and W&D 40 the OP can make it look much better than it looks now.


  13. Thanks
    saswatch88 got a reaction from poolen0123 in How to clean vintage silver watch dial with green rust/stain like this   
    Anything that can be used to attack lime.
  14. Thanks
    saswatch88 got a reaction from poolen0123 in How to clean vintage silver watch dial with green rust/stain like this   
    I would be careful using anything acidic, you really run the risk of removing more of the writing on the dial, esp since some of is already coming off.
    there are two things you can use that are safe. Calcium Lime Rust (CLR) and WD-40. I like to do a cleaning with CLR first then finish off with the WD-40. It’s safe on writing and varnish, u have to do some wiping, i suggest using a make up remover pad to gently wipe off the lime. Use the WD-40 to remove any CLR residue 
     
  15. Like
    saswatch88 got a reaction from Graziano in How to clean vintage silver watch dial with green rust/stain like this   
    I would be careful using anything acidic, you really run the risk of removing more of the writing on the dial, esp since some of is already coming off.
    there are two things you can use that are safe. Calcium Lime Rust (CLR) and WD-40. I like to do a cleaning with CLR first then finish off with the WD-40. It’s safe on writing and varnish, u have to do some wiping, i suggest using a make up remover pad to gently wipe off the lime. Use the WD-40 to remove any CLR residue 
     
  16. Like
    saswatch88 got a reaction from Graziano in Hardening Steel   
    There is a color chart you should refer to when hardening metal. Each color is for what you are trying to harden something small enough to fit in a pivot hole should not be made red hot, that will cause them to brake very easily even if you temper them. I believe the color you are looking for is a medium yellow at about 420 degrees. Quench in oil not water, you will have to do it again in order to temper it.
  17. Like
    saswatch88 got a reaction from SparkyLB in Hardening Steel   
    There is a color chart you should refer to when hardening metal. Each color is for what you are trying to harden something small enough to fit in a pivot hole should not be made red hot, that will cause them to brake very easily even if you temper them. I believe the color you are looking for is a medium yellow at about 420 degrees. Quench in oil not water, you will have to do it again in order to temper it.
  18. Like
    saswatch88 got a reaction from VWatchie in First watch cleaning/oiling help   
    @brenguywow thats awkward i have never seen that. have you tried it in other positions? I just see it in the DU position in the video and in that position you cant see how the balance or escape is functioning. One trick i learned from DeCarle is you can take the movement and press it against your ear. start with your head at a 90 degree angle parallel to the floor (so its movement is in DU), then while holding the movement next to your head, move your head from side to up to other side then back then forward to mimic some of the positions you would use on the timegrapher, while slowly moving your head in all of these positions listen for any inconsistencies in the beat or ticking. This how they did it before timegraphers came out. And it is one of the best ways to detect a positional beat error when technology fails you.
  19. Like
    saswatch88 got a reaction from LonglineOjoe in Seiko case backs   
    i personally think ebay is the best source, speedtimerkollection doesnt always have the harder to find case backs like the ones you mentioned and I highly doubt they will have a bullhead case back.
  20. Like
    saswatch88 got a reaction from vinn3 in Poor Amplitude   
    that is true you never know what someone else may have used before, unless you are familiar with manufacturer, caliber and grade there is no way to tell. Which is why i stopped working on swiss trench and pocket watches, way too many movements out there and no resources on them. Thats why I made the switch to American movements. plenty of resources and NOS parts available, and they hold much more value since the craftsmanship of the time was unmatched compared to the swiss.
  21. Thanks
    saswatch88 got a reaction from Nucejoe in Poor Amplitude   
    Mainspring gauge. You stick the MS in the slot and pull it down till it stops then that is your measurement. It’s called a Dennison gauge. You can use calipers but this will give you the Swiss Dennison size.

  22. Like
    saswatch88 reacted to ITProDad in Advice needed in regards to a Porcelain Dial   
    Very nice! I love American pocket watches.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  23. Like
    saswatch88 reacted to JohnR725 in Amplitude drops after service   
    There is a minor problem with this statement above. I have a friend that we like to bicker over lubrication. He was taught by his grandfather who recommended three lubricants. Basically a grease light oil and heavy oil and that was it. But someone our discussion it was discovered that His grandpa was servicing watches they were expected to come back for servicing each year. The cases were not sealed up they're not like today when you service a modern automatic it's probably going to be gone for five years.
    It's amazing what you can do short term it's the long term that's going to be the problem. It's why I suspect were seeing it trend of changes. The quantity of oil used has increased. Then heavier viscosity lubrication's I'm assuming all designed to keep that lubrication there for at least five years.
    Then there is the escapement lubrication I think that the super minimalistic they're going for performance. This is why they're going minimalistic with the 9415 Because as you've noted if you have too much you have a problem.
  24. Thanks
    saswatch88 reacted to rodabod in Amplitude drops after service   
    As for escapement oiling, perform your own experiments with a timegrapher to observe changes in amplitude and consistency in the trace. It's very easy to over-oil the pallet faces with 9415 - I've done it myself. I follow the BHI's lubrication guide and generally have no issues.
  25. Like
    saswatch88 got a reaction from tomsch in remove case back   
    Yes iam familiar with those too, a lot of Waltham/Elgin’s from the late 20s and 30s have cases like that they are much easier to open up.
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