Jump to content

HSL

Member
  • Content Count

    519
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    18

Reputation Activity

  1. Thanks
    HSL got a reaction from VWatchie in What Could Be Causing Low Amplitude   
    I've been following this thread and found it mostly interesting.Low amplitude can be caused by several things but if it isn't that a pivot that broke of they mostly have one thing in common, friction.

    To have an genuine understanding in what is happening in the escapement and what could cause the low amplitude one have to understand the function of it. So I always urge people to go the long way and get a thorough understanding in what is happening in the area you are fault finding . Sometimes one gets lucky and it is just a easy fix with cleaning and correct lubrication, another time it's crocked banking pins or loose/damage pallets.
    About oiling the pallets I never used to do it until I watched one of Marks videos where he showed how to put a small amount of oil on the pallets face, run the escapement for a couple of turns and after that removing the pallet fork and cleaning of the excess oil from it and after that putting it back again. This method works like a charm for me.
    I put a small PDF together so the less gifted like me can follow the discussion in this thread and maybe get a better understanding of what Nickelsilver and the boys/girls are talking about.
    The Escapement function.pdf
  2. Like
    HSL got a reaction from nightwatchman in Lubrication Resources   
    Since lubrication technics and material seems to be a frequent returning subject I thought one could collect some links and pdf files on the subject in ONE Place so it is easy to find them.
    Here comes my contribution in this link Collection.
    Moebius
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Home (list of lubricants)
    http://www.moebius-lubricants.ch/en/products/oils
    New (Just a lubrication chart)
    http://www.moebius-lubricants.ch/sites/default/themes/moebius/extras/pdf/tableEN.pdf
    Old (Moebius sales program, more detailed information)
    Moebius Sales program.pdf

     British Horological Intitute (BHI)
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    http://www.nawcc-index.net/Articles/BTI-The_Practical_Lubrication_of_Clocks_and_Watches.pdf

    American Watchmakers - Clockmakers Institute (AWCI, Nice and detailed pictures.)
    ---------------------------------------------------
    Train Jewel Lubrication
    https://www.awci.com/watchmaking-excellen/applying-oil-to-train-jewels/
    Cap Jewel
    https://www.awci.com/watchmaking-excellen/cap-jewel-preparation/
    Pallet Fork
    https://www.awci.com/watchmaking-excellen/lubrication/
     
  3. Like
    HSL reacted to jdm in INCA BLOC HELL   
    Have you ever heard of Rodico? It can hold and pick up pretty much anything.
  4. Like
    HSL got a reaction from rogart63 in Question, HS in the family   
    Those in the picture above is the hardcore ones no collar..
     

  5. Like
    HSL got a reaction from rogart63 in Question, HS in the family   
    Vintage hairsprings is probably the largest headache since most of the old knowledge has been forgotten when the modern watchmaker begun to buy balance complete with already matched spings and balances. The balance on these are laser adjusted.
    On the packages of the vintage springs there often are the markings Gr and Fce learning what they stand for would help people like me with less knowledge to choose the correct spring to vibrate faster. Was there any standardized system for this type of marking?

  6. Thanks
    HSL got a reaction from VWatchie in ETA 255.111 among others walkthrough   
    Now it is time for me to look at the ETA 255.111, a movement found in a large amount of mid-priced quarts watches from Certina, Tissot, Omega, ETERNA, Longines, Tudor and many others.
    Though it goes by many names the original movement can be used as a guide when servicing others in this family.
    To save space and not make the thread a mile long I as usual made two PDF files of the Disassembly and Assembly of the movement.
    And as usual I urge you to look at the oiling and greasing scheme in the original documents from ETA.
    Enjoy!

     

    ETA_255_111_Disassemble.pdf
    ETA_255_111_Assemble.pdf
  7. Like
    HSL got a reaction from Nucejoe in Question, HS in the family   
    Vintage hairsprings is probably the largest headache since most of the old knowledge has been forgotten when the modern watchmaker begun to buy balance complete with already matched spings and balances. The balance on these are laser adjusted.
    On the packages of the vintage springs there often are the markings Gr and Fce learning what they stand for would help people like me with less knowledge to choose the correct spring to vibrate faster. Was there any standardized system for this type of marking?

  8. Like
    HSL reacted to easj369 in Revisiting an old hobby   
    I just wanted to say thank you for all of your posts.  They actually made me finally sign up on the forum.
  9. Like
    HSL reacted to nickelsilver in Question, HS in the family   
    In the past, like over 50 years ago, each spring was vibrated to its balance. Each balance, while superficially identical, could be different enough from the next one in the box to make the hairsprings incompatible. The modern method is more automatic, the springs are colleted then cut to a given length, the terminal curve formed, stud attached. They are then each tested and graded into about 20 categories; the balances are likewise graded into 20 categories. If you look at the results of the categorization, it makes a nice bell curve, with the majority falling within perhaps 4-5 middle spots, the rest dispersed in decreasing numbers towards the ends.
    The balances and hairspring are just mated according to the category. If you try to mate a Cat 1 spring to a Cat 20 balance it won't work at all. If you try between Cat 9,10,11, it may work OK. Of course there's no way to know which one is which once it leaves the timing department of the factory.
     
    Balances with screws add a dimension of adaptability as you can add and remove weight easily. Solid balances can only have weight removed, and the adjustment is permanent.
  10. Like
    HSL got a reaction from ITProDad in Looking for a camera   
    I agree with this, a good lighting makes wounders.
    Usually when I post here I take a quick picture with my phone and the 21Mp is quite fair and the files are small enough to upload.
    But a camera, correct lighting and a macro is what it takes to do some good movement por*.
    This pictures is just a part of a picture since I can't upload the complete one (Camera is a Sony A7R II 42,4 Mp so the files  becomes large) but one gets what the difference in ligting do compared to my phone ones, this is just a part of the picture, it is just over 800k large! (or small).....


     
  11. Like
    HSL got a reaction from vinn3 in Looking for a camera   
    I agree with this, a good lighting makes wounders.
    Usually when I post here I take a quick picture with my phone and the 21Mp is quite fair and the files are small enough to upload.
    But a camera, correct lighting and a macro is what it takes to do some good movement por*.
    This pictures is just a part of a picture since I can't upload the complete one (Camera is a Sony A7R II 42,4 Mp so the files  becomes large) but one gets what the difference in ligting do compared to my phone ones, this is just a part of the picture, it is just over 800k large! (or small).....


     
  12. Like
    HSL got a reaction from dadistic in Looking for a camera   
    I agree with this, a good lighting makes wounders.
    Usually when I post here I take a quick picture with my phone and the 21Mp is quite fair and the files are small enough to upload.
    But a camera, correct lighting and a macro is what it takes to do some good movement por*.
    This pictures is just a part of a picture since I can't upload the complete one (Camera is a Sony A7R II 42,4 Mp so the files  becomes large) but one gets what the difference in ligting do compared to my phone ones, this is just a part of the picture, it is just over 800k large! (or small).....


     
  13. Thanks
    HSL got a reaction from Nucejoe in ETA 255.111 among others walkthrough   
    Now it is time for me to look at the ETA 255.111, a movement found in a large amount of mid-priced quarts watches from Certina, Tissot, Omega, ETERNA, Longines, Tudor and many others.
    Though it goes by many names the original movement can be used as a guide when servicing others in this family.
    To save space and not make the thread a mile long I as usual made two PDF files of the Disassembly and Assembly of the movement.
    And as usual I urge you to look at the oiling and greasing scheme in the original documents from ETA.
    Enjoy!

     

    ETA_255_111_Disassemble.pdf
    ETA_255_111_Assemble.pdf
  14. Like
    HSL got a reaction from rogart63 in Looking for part number   
    If it's just the part number you want I Think this is it.
    065-507 (J810M CITIZEN STEM )
  15. Like
    HSL got a reaction from jdm in Looking for a camera   
    I agree with this, a good lighting makes wounders.
    Usually when I post here I take a quick picture with my phone and the 21Mp is quite fair and the files are small enough to upload.
    But a camera, correct lighting and a macro is what it takes to do some good movement por*.
    This pictures is just a part of a picture since I can't upload the complete one (Camera is a Sony A7R II 42,4 Mp so the files  becomes large) but one gets what the difference in ligting do compared to my phone ones, this is just a part of the picture, it is just over 800k large! (or small).....


     
  16. Like
    HSL got a reaction from AndyHull in Digital Hairspring Timing Tool   
    I think there would be several possibilities to make a device like that to work. This sunday I got an hour to myself from my other household duties so I sat down and thought things throug. Eldery devices use a finely tuned spring and balance to compare the oscillation against, when the two balances are in sync you make a reading towards a scale.
    But modern equipment probably need something else to detect the spokes on a balance, since it's rotating on its pivot I don't think you could use sound to determine the oscillation. One probly wouldn't want to touch anything on the setup so two methodes comes into mind:
    1. Use a Hall sensor.
    2. Use light sensitive electronics.
    I think a hallsensor would work really good but I don't know how small thiny hairsprings would react to an electric field so I will go for a light sensitive sensor.
    Just out of chance I pulled out a TCRT5000 Reflective Infrared Sensor out of my Arduino toybox and made a preliminary test.
    I sometimes design high speed odometers for autonomous vehicles so this was a different challenge, to get a device which detect low frequencie movements. A hairspring in some cases oscillate at 18000 A/h which is a frequency off (18000/3600) 5Hz.
    The setup was able to detect even lower frequencies so I don't Think the Electronics will be the challenge but the design of the sensor setup might take an hour or two. I plan to use a non polarizing glas from a microscope on which the balance can spin freely.
    I only took 20 minutes this time to prove the concept and it will probaly work like a charm so this is something I will put into the projects que for fun things to do with your 3-D printer a dark Nordic Winter night.
     

  17. Like
    HSL reacted to rduckwor in Three that I recently finished.   
    First a nice Elgin driver, a "Parkton" I believe. Its been sitting finished so long I can't remember the movement details, but a 670 inside I "think".
     
    Next a 1928 Elgin in a "jobbers" case with a 6/0s, Grade 430, seven jewel movement.
     
    Finally, a lovely Elgin "Capricorn" with a 714 Shockmaster movement.  Michael was a lucky kid in 1962.  The movement dates to 1958.
     
    RMD
     





  18. Like
    HSL got a reaction from vinn3 in Fake Military Watches?   
    If you look in the book "German Military Timepieces of World War II Volume 3 German Army/Waffen-SS" by Ulric of England and
    on Page 33 you can see how a genuine should look like, Helvetia made a similar watch before like in the early 30's and after the war so they became popular to sell from countries like Ukraine where they just popped in a Helvetia caliber 82A or similar in a fake case.

    Germans are known for their efficiency and during a raging war they wouldn´t care to engrave the movement with the amount of jewels and so on the barrels and thats why the most confirmed genuine are just blank inside with just 82A stamped on the side; while one from the 30's would have some text and even some serial numbers on the train bridge. All the casebacks in the book has the 3190 engraved in them and so do the fakes, but the most genuine has a CB mark stamped on the inside.

    The things to be aware of here is the serial number on the trainbridge, looks like a 6-9 number serial, what you would expect on a pre war (81-24) movement.
    The movement mostly provided during the WW2 was the 82A-24. On this specimen you also can see the text General Watch Co , Helvetia's parent company on the movement which I think never occures on the real deal.

    The D 15004 H looks a bit familiar to a case I bought from the bay in 2017 just for reseach purposes, think the serial was D 15009 H or something like that.
    But who knows progress in identifying these gems might have progressed but I wold want to see the inside of the back and a better closeup of the movement before buying it.
  19. Like
    HSL got a reaction from VWatchie in ETA 2472 - Disassembling the date mechanism   
    Såja, riktigt fina bilder!
    Now you can relax and enjoy a Gin & Tonic... 
  20. Thanks
    HSL reacted to VWatchie in ETA 2472 - Disassembling the date mechanism   
    The following sequence of pictures shows how to disassemble the date mechanism of ETA calibre 2472 and ETA calibre 2474.
    Previously I posted a sequence of pictures showing how to disassemble the automatic device of ETA calibres 2472 and 2474 as well as ETA calibres 2450 to 2454. You’ll find the post here.



























     
  21. Like
    HSL reacted to Watchtime in ETA 2472 - Disassembling the date mechanism   
    Great teardown, I really enjoy all your write-ups, in fact I download them and use them to practise my "skills"......thanks for sharing bro
  22. Like
    HSL reacted to nickelsilver in Mainspring hardening and tempering   
    It's marked 4 days on the dial, so figuring one day reserve that's 120 hours, at 10.4 hours per turn of barrel you need 11.5 turns. That's a lot, most available springs are made figuring on around 6 turns. This site has some really great info on mainsprings, with good calculators. According to them you need a spring 0.225mm thick, and betweed 1420 and 1550 in length to get 11.5 turns.
     
    As for hardening and tempering a mainspring, I don't know how it can be done without specialized equipment.
  23. Like
    HSL reacted to AndyHull in Tissot problem   
    I suspect this is part of the story. The fact that it lasts 15 hours suggests that the mainspring may be the issue, as it reaches a certain point of its expansion within the barrel, it may be catching (possibly on some dirt, or possibly on a wear mark within the barrel or barrel lid), once it sticks in this way, it then has far less torque, and acts as described in the previous post.
    I would start by cleaning and inspecting the mainspring.
  24. Thanks
    HSL got a reaction from VWatchie in ETA 2472 - Disassembling the automatic device   
    VWAtchie Must say very nice work as usuall, a real treat, keep up this good work!
  25. Thanks
    HSL reacted to VWatchie in ETA 2472 - Disassembling the automatic device   
    If you’re like me, taking apart you first ETA calibre 2472 and feeling somewhat intimidated after having removed the case back lid looking down on the automatic works, then you will likely appreciate this post.
    By the way, except for the oscillating weight itself, the automatic winding device is identical for the following calibres:
    ETA 2450, ETA 2451, ETA 2452, ETA 2453, ETA 2454, ETA 2472, and ETA 2474.
    My only other experience of ETA’s automatic winding devices comes from calibre 2824-2. So, looking down on the oscillating weight of the ETA 2472 and not seeing a screw holding it attached to the automatic device framework, made me think the parts had somehow been riveted together and probably were inseparable. Having removed and looked at the back of the automatic device framework I could see that the oscillating weight was indeed attached with a screw or at least something that reminded me of a screw. Its slot was very thin, and it sat in a large jewel! No way I was going to try to remove it without knowing for sure it could be done and how it should be done, especially as this watch wasn’t mine but my brother’s who’d trusted it to me for an overhaul.
    My first thought then was to try to remove all wheels without touching the oscillating weight. After having looked at the device for a good long while, I realized I wouldn’t be able to remove a single wheel before separating the oscillating weight from the framework. So, I decided to be patient (hardest part of watch repairing), put the parts away for now and research the Internet. I Googled “eta 2472 how to remove oscillating weight”. The first hit was “Untitled - OM-Mechanics”, a PDF document. Well, I wasn’t feeling very optimistic but lo and behold, there it was, in full detail!
    Anyway, the PDF is pretty poorly scanned, and it isn’t all that easy to read the part numbers, so I decided to make my own picture guide for disassembling the automatic device of this ETA calibre 2472, and that’s what follows next:
    (Eventually, I’ll publish a complete ETA calibre 2472 service picture walkthrough. If interested, you’ll find a link to it in a future post in this thread.)






















     
×
×
  • Create New...