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HSL

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  1. Like
    HSL got a reaction from RyMoeller in Do or Die repair   
    I think @oldhippy is right.
     
    From wrestling with hairsprings this is one of the trickiest repairs to do, and when doing it one whish one saved the previous discarded part in the “good to have in the future box”.
    When it comes to replacing the teeth the donor piece has to come from a wheel not only with the same diameter but also the same type of teeth and depth on them, this is so you will get the correct amount of freedom for the wheels to rotate in a correct way.
    Even small differences like these ones will make the wheels not to run correctly in the length.
     
    Another thing to consider is how to put the new piece in place. One should avoid making a rectangular shape to fit with and instead make a “dove tail” shape with a precision triangular file.
    Since the teeth on the wheel is subjected to lateral driving pressures a rectangular shape will eventually cause it to wriggle free and fall out, the solder hasn’t a very good mechanical resistance.
    This is just some small tips and tricks to think of when repairing wheels.


  2. Like
    HSL got a reaction from AshF in Do or Die repair   
    I think @oldhippy is right.
     
    From wrestling with hairsprings this is one of the trickiest repairs to do, and when doing it one whish one saved the previous discarded part in the “good to have in the future box”.
    When it comes to replacing the teeth the donor piece has to come from a wheel not only with the same diameter but also the same type of teeth and depth on them, this is so you will get the correct amount of freedom for the wheels to rotate in a correct way.
    Even small differences like these ones will make the wheels not to run correctly in the length.
     
    Another thing to consider is how to put the new piece in place. One should avoid making a rectangular shape to fit with and instead make a “dove tail” shape with a precision triangular file.
    Since the teeth on the wheel is subjected to lateral driving pressures a rectangular shape will eventually cause it to wriggle free and fall out, the solder hasn’t a very good mechanical resistance.
    This is just some small tips and tricks to think of when repairing wheels.


  3. Like
    HSL reacted to VWatchie in USSR chronograph info   
    Just in case anyone missed it. Watch Repair Channel now covers the Poljot cal, 3133:
     
  4. Thanks
    HSL got a reaction from Nucejoe in Problem with refurbish watch hands.   
    Nowdays most deliver 1 small container luminous powder, 1 small bottle of accrylic varnish and one small bottle acrylic thinner to get the right consistency.
  5. Thanks
    HSL got a reaction from VWatchie in Problem with refurbish watch hands.   
    You could take a look at this, it shows a quite standard procedure.
     
  6. Like
    HSL got a reaction from JayG17 in Problem with refurbish watch hands.   
    You could take a look at this, it shows a quite standard procedure.
     
  7. Thanks
    HSL got a reaction from Nucejoe in Problem with refurbish watch hands.   
    You could take a look at this, it shows a quite standard procedure.
     
  8. Like
    HSL got a reaction from VWatchie in USSR chronograph info   
    I took a look at the web when I saw this still was here, despite the watch seems to be older the serial number on the bridge seems to say it was produces somewhere between 1996-1997.
    There is an excelent site helping with dating these beasts here..
    http://www.polmax3133.com/guide.html
     
  9. Like
    HSL reacted to nickelsilver in Graver types?   
    Henry Fried's Watch Repairer's Manual has a section on graver types and specifically on turning a balance staff.
    Those DeanUK vids are good, that should get you going. I like that he turns at quite a low RPM, one of the biggest mistakes I see is folks want to turn at top speed, and while "correct" in some situations is usually conterproductive when hand turning. Some schools have the students using hand powered lathes for the bulk of their hand turning training. I generally use two speeds when turning, around 2k rpm, my fast speed, and around 800. While my machine is physically capable of going well over 10k the way it's set up it maxes around 4k and it's rare that I find any need to go that high at all. The main reason you go slow is you have to make a chip, not scrape metal off. At high speeds you either have to have very fast and confident reflexes or you end up scraping. Same goes for micro drilling. The books will tell you to spin at 50k for a tiny hole, the reality is about 1/20 is about all you can really react to when hand feeding.
     
  10. Haha
    HSL got a reaction from Rocket in 404 Club   
    I forgot a contribution to this club. Got a bunch of watches in a lot I bought a while ago, think the average price was about 3£ a piece, sometimes one just need one part and end up with a bunch of classic watches, like this which I’m quite sure is the pride of some eastern country watchmaking.
    Let me introduce the 39-Day calendar watch! With this one all your vacations becomes a little bit longer 
     



  11. Like
    HSL got a reaction from Rocket in How to deal with old gold plated case?   
    The bezel ring and the crown looks like they been gold plated but the rest of the case looks suspiciously like an alloy, maybe brass. You probably can see what the case are made of by popping the case back off and there Longines usually have the data stamped, must say I never seen that case style on an 817 before either.
    Anyhow think the polishing cloth @Rocket suggests is the way to go with softer metals.
  12. Like
    HSL got a reaction from AshF in Omega 13 "'   
    Last night I didn't really feel like watching some Netflix series so I silently returned to the watch workshop. Blind folded from some previous activities I stretched my arm into the box containing not so urgent fix watches/movements.
    Today the lucky turn had come to a nice little ladies Omega 13”’ movement, it passed its 100 year anniversary so I think it is time for a nice bath and service.
    Guess we just have to dive into it and see what we can do to it.
    Just to save space on this server I compiled everything in a web optimized PDF file.

    Omega 13 ligne.pdf
    And here are some snapps from the content. Enjoy!
    The finished result

    Freestyle assembly
     

    I still have a brainfart of this part name

  13. Thanks
    HSL got a reaction from Khan in Omega 30 t2 pc - balance wheel stuck   
    This is probably exactly how they are setup with these Omegas too.
    I use to take a shot when working on watches and by a chance I found one when I changed the balance staff on one of these.
     

  14. Like
    HSL reacted to nickelsilver in Omega 30 t2 pc - balance wheel stuck   
    The standard is with the roller centered with the arms, it the most aesthetically pleasing, also means the arms are not obscuring the fork when setting up the escapement, and makes visually checking the amplitude easy.

    As the roller is not poised, it does have an effect on the balance poise. So balances are always poised with the roller in place. For fun, reverse the position of roller and hairspring 180 degrees on a watch with a good rate in the vertical positions. It goes way out.

    On 3 arm balances it can really be anywhere. If in doubt after replacing a staff, bet on placing the roller jewel opposite where metal was removed to poise the balance.
  15. Like
    HSL got a reaction from Bauertime in Pallet oil-witch to use?   
    The epilame is a surface treatment which changes the surface tension. This ability makes the oils be more collected into one spot, you get the same result when you clean a pallet jewel good and polish it with for example a bit of leather on a stick. When you put a drop of any liquid in a highly polished surface the drop will be set in one place like a small ball. The epilame creates a similar function but also keeps the oil in place.
    I personally only use epilame on spots where the angle of rotation is higher like on pallet fork jewel faces, the escape wheel, the cap jewels, pivots of the seconds wheel and reverser wheels. 
    In these places the epilame helps to keep the oil in place instead of squirting away.
    A secondary bonus is the epilame makes the oiling a bit easier but that isn’t the products main purpose.
    I would only use Moebius 9010 on highspeed and low torque places like cap jewels, escape wheel and seconds wheel, it’s a very light oil.
    On pallet jewel faces I personally only would use Moebius 941 or Moebius 9415. The Moebius 941 is an oil purpose made for pallet faces, with this I recommend the use of epilame to keep it in place.
    Time flies and with it the development of lubricants. To get the latest data from for example Moebius one could visit their official site.

    http://www.moebius-lubricants.ch/sites/default/themes/moebius/extras/pdf/tableEN.pdf

    I personally don’t use Moebius 8000 anymore I gone fully synthetic all the way.
    The Moebius 9415 is considered a thixotropic grease which will change properties when subjected to pressure.   At first it is firm grease and changes to liquid when hit by the escape club impulse face.
    So if you don’t use epilame then the choise is Moebius 9415.
    A bonus is if you know the history of the watch, the epilame surface treatment doesn’t wear away immediately but survives 2 or three services. So, you don’t need to use it at every service, in the best of worlds you treat a watch in every 12-15 years interval so in the long run those 150$ will go a long way.
    This is a topic that pops up now and then and is covered in other threads and my final thought still is why one should lubricate a gem like a watch different in hobby use than if you would get it lubricated professionally? The price for a watch service often comes with a high price tag because it usually isn’t cheap to service a mechanical watch in the correct way. Doing it you self will save you the cost of manhours.
     
  16. Like
    HSL reacted to Rocket in How to deal with old gold plated case?   
    Im not a expert here. But I think carful test with a jewlery polishing cloth, might be a good start. 
  17. Like
    HSL reacted to nickelsilver in problem with Tissot C01.211   
    The auto system on this caliber is very simple. The reverser is really just a pinion on the rotor which is held in one direction by a click spring. The pinion needs to turn freely (minus the spring) on the rotor, and be lubricated. When hand winding the pinion spins past the click; if the lubrication has become sticky the rotor will spin. Use a plastic pointed stick (or two) to remove the clip holding the rotor on, it's very easy to scratch the rotor with metal tools.
     
    If you do a full service on it, beware of using alcohol on the date support (it's a full plate made of acrylic that covers the dial side)- alcohol will damage it. It's possible that the latest executions changed the plastic but I don't think so. I wouldn't recommend it as a first chronograph, it's a robust movement but has some tricky parts to deal with.
     
    Here's a manual
  18. Like
    HSL got a reaction from Rocket in Omega 13 "'   
    Last night I didn't really feel like watching some Netflix series so I silently returned to the watch workshop. Blind folded from some previous activities I stretched my arm into the box containing not so urgent fix watches/movements.
    Today the lucky turn had come to a nice little ladies Omega 13”’ movement, it passed its 100 year anniversary so I think it is time for a nice bath and service.
    Guess we just have to dive into it and see what we can do to it.
    Just to save space on this server I compiled everything in a web optimized PDF file.

    Omega 13 ligne.pdf
    And here are some snapps from the content. Enjoy!
    The finished result

    Freestyle assembly
     

    I still have a brainfart of this part name

  19. Like
    HSL reacted to Rocket in My watch "collection" So far. :)   
    Shouldn’t have.. Bit couldn’t resist bidding.. 
    I always wanted a pocket watch. You know classy looking. Bit “chunky” with loud and “chunky” ticking. Won this at a good price. 
    I have no clue what it is. Seems like a no name. But is in nice condition. Have been serviced at least a cpl of times. There is some watchmakers markings. 
    Include a few pictures. So Maby one of you specialists have some leads? 
    It has now been laying ticking on my desk for 6hrs. Seems to keep time very well. Took a look at the balance with my loupe. Someone has been adjusting it. But the hairspring doesn’t look concentric. Well, it is Maby a project for the future. I’m happy just having it, ticking on the desk! 
     






  20. Thanks
    HSL got a reaction from Rocket in ETA Resources   
    Just to avoid making too many new topics with the same subject I will post these PDF:s in this old thread.
    Since flashplayer is obselete due to security lacks and not every one wants to activate it I have made some PDF:s with two of the most popular movements.
    This version uses a normal PDF format which you can print out and make notes in while servicing the movement, you can brows them offline while lapping sun.

    ETA 7750 Chronograph.

    ETA 7750 Service Notes.pdf 
    ETA 6497 

    SwissLab_6497 Service Notes.pdf
  21. Thanks
    HSL got a reaction from Rocket in ETA Resources   
    Just thought I should post some links here from ETA Costumer support. They are quite informative and gives you something to do on a rainy summer day.

    The first one is to their Dictionary, here you can find all their definitions and even how things works, like the escapement and so on.

    https://www.eta.ch/dictionary/dictionary.html
    The other ones are movement specific

    ETA 2892A2
    https://www.eta.ch/swisslab/2892a2/2892a2.html
    ETA 7750
    https://www.eta.ch/swisslab/7750/7750.html
    ETA 6497
    https://www.eta.ch/swisslab/6497/6947.html
    ETA 251.471
    https://www.eta.ch/swisslab/251471/251471.html

    When you go there the first time you probably need to get flash.. look up in the left corner.
    After loading it is just to start exploring the information.

     

  22. Like
    HSL got a reaction from Rocket in Watch of Today   
    Today I found out the MOERIS is a perfect counterweight on the arm when removing the balance from a dodgy AS970 balance staff.
    It is a UNITAS 6498 Pocket watch conversersion which will give you the perfect swagg when walking the stripp .


  23. Like
    HSL got a reaction from AndyHull in Watch of Today   
    Today I found out the MOERIS is a perfect counterweight on the arm when removing the balance from a dodgy AS970 balance staff.
    It is a UNITAS 6498 Pocket watch conversersion which will give you the perfect swagg when walking the stripp .


  24. Thanks
    HSL got a reaction from Nucejoe in ETA Resources   
    Just to avoid making too many new topics with the same subject I will post these PDF:s in this old thread.
    Since flashplayer is obselete due to security lacks and not every one wants to activate it I have made some PDF:s with two of the most popular movements.
    This version uses a normal PDF format which you can print out and make notes in while servicing the movement, you can brows them offline while lapping sun.

    ETA 7750 Chronograph.

    ETA 7750 Service Notes.pdf 
    ETA 6497 

    SwissLab_6497 Service Notes.pdf
  25. Like
    HSL got a reaction from watchweasol in Poising/timing balance wheel   
    Hmm I think all three Fried, Nucejoe and rodabod says the same thing but in different ways, moving or unscrewing the meantime screws outwards will slow the balances oscillation down, Fried just do it the right way by adding a washer"weight" will assure the screw stays in place, just threads will not assure this. By adding the washer it will move the meantime screws position outwards and add a slight weight and by that slow the balance oscillation down. Taking meantime screws off or tighten them  will make the balance increase the oscillation and the watch goes faster.
     
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