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AndyHull

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Everything posted by AndyHull

  1. There are loads (and I do mean loads) of cheap, second hand Seiko and Citizen watches on ebay from Indian sellers. The movements are usually "high mileage" and although the sellers often claim the watch to be "fully serviced", the state of these watches vary from pristine, like new, to frankly filthy. So far as practice pieces go, they are ideal, complete with interesting quirks. Don't pay more than £10 for one, unless it looks exceptionally good. I added a couple of actually quite nice ones to my "404 collection" (watches picked up on ebay for £4.04 or less). Also look at HMT wat
  2. " Similar systems are ETA's Etachoc, Kif, Seiko's Diashock, and Citizen's Parashock." Source -> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incabloc_shock_protection_system That is by no means a comprehensive list. Lots of variations exist, each claiming to be better than the rest in some obscure way.
  3. .. and finally .. if you are really in the mood for experimentation (and possibly releasing much magic smoke on the way).. there is this... https://www.instructables.com/id/Wireless-Ipod-Charger/ OK probably only as a last resort. .. but at least it is a little less crude than this... https://www.instructables.com/id/Very-Cheap-DIY-Kinetic-Watch-Winder/
  4. One other experiment I would be tempted to try, would be using one of those $2 cheap "Qi Wireless Charging Charger Dock Pad For iPhone X" gadgets you get on ebay. I have no idea if they would actually work, but for $2 it would be tempting to give it a try... assuming I had a suitable watch to experiment with, which I don't... (Andy Hull goes off to lurk on ebay to see if he can find a suitable victim watch to play with).
  5. Not sure if this helps. http://shop-kanazawa.jp/shopping/product-detail.php?id=1616 Google translate link. https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&tab=TT&sl=ja&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fshop-kanazawa.jp%2Fshopping%2Fproduct-detail.php%3Fid%3D1616 .. and no, I don't speak Japanese, before anyone asks. Intriguingly someone had some success charging with a Braun toothbrush charger. Also the charger itself is an inductive loop that, according to the manual operates at approximately 1kHz, so if your electronic foo is up to it, you might try me
  6. What ails that child of the eighties?
  7. This might also be of interest. -> https://www.ebay.com/itm/USED-VINTAGE-RADO-DIASTAR-CASE-2836-2846-GOOD-CONDITION-SPAREPART-001-/113296385296 .. depending on your budget, and whether or not it is a perfect match for your movement of course.
  8. If the grey colour is likely to be an issue, then you can add pigments to epoxy (including "gold" pigment), which might help disguise the crack. Search ebay/ali/amazon for something like "Gold Mica Powder Pearl Pigment" and you will see there are quite a number of options. The pigments will slightly lower the bond strength, but given that this is a casting that is not normally subject to loading or shock, this is probably not a major concern.
  9. I couldn't decide whether to post this in WOTd - or "What watch to take on holiday". The beat up old Sicura Voyager is still on its voyages, and despite a couple of stalls (the autowinder probably needs a little TLC) it is still keeping good time. Its been bounced about in the back of a jeep, crossed the deserts of Rajastan in pursuit of leopards and tigers, endured the "forty cigarettes a day" levels of winter pollution in Delhi, been subjected to temperatures from +3C to +30C, survived some of the most "interesting" driving in the world and is here finally enjoying the relaxing
  10. Fixing the casting looks like it might be a little tricky, simply because getting the epoxy in to that crack could be problematic. A slow setting and relatively watery epoxy, like JB weld is probably a good bet. Apparently epoxy can be thinned with acetone or denatures alchohol, to some degree but I've never tried, so I can't verify this. Try this experiment with some scrap before you commit to doing it where failure is not an option, and don't breath the fumes. Also take a little time to think how you intend to clamp the crack shut without marring the rest of the case. A good firm clampi
  11. Ahh.... if only I was being paid Bollywood wages. Sadly I don't have the youthful killer good looks, or the talent. Not that a couple of minor details like that should stop me from applying for the job anyway. You'll all be the first to know if I land the lead roll.
  12. I'm on holiday in northern India at the moment, so not too many Christmas trees in the traditional sense in evidence (there are one or two, and the occasional Santa too). However if interesting not-Christmas tree shots, are permitted (well it has lots of trees in it, so why not), try this one that I took a couple of days back. See if you can spot the watcher before it spots you. Merry Christmas and a happy New Year to you all.
  13. I can't think of a chemical reaction that would take place between the chrome (or other metal plating) and the solvent directly, but any lacquers, varnishes or other protective finishes may well be affected. Also it occurs to me that when it evaporates, the solvent may leave behind a residue of less volatile "stuff" that was dissolved and then re-deposited after the solvent has flashed off. In other words, you may have varnished the metal with some random dissolved dirt. See if the pale marks rub off.
  14. From what I've seen and read, the HMT movements are fairly robust. As to being worn and poorly serviced, the same could sadly be said for a lot of, if not most older mechanical watches these days. Sadly very few people take the time, or spend the money necessary to keep a watch clean, services, and in good repair. If you want a new HMT automatic, however, you can still pick them up from the HMT site (at the time of writing this). As I understand it, they are slowly running out of parts to build these watches, so now would be the time to to acquire one. I do agree that most of the HMT wat
  15. I think this might hit the mark, being both inexpensive enough to take on holiday, and interesting enough to warrant actually wearing. Its heading my way from that well known Yorkshire fishing village Eee-bay, (don't expect my jokes to get any better than that or you will be disappointed). Another potential member of the 404 club, assuming I get it working of course, membership is strictly limited to the living rather than the dead. It just squeezed in to the aspiring members list with five pence to spare. I still haven't had a chance to search locally here holidaying in India
  16. I guess you need to figure out what size the hands are (i.e. the inside diameter where they each attach, and their respective lengths), and where the dial feet are placed relative to the 12 O'clock position and each other, armed with that info, you would be in a better position to search for a suitable movement. Alternatively let us see a few clear, close up pictures of the current movement, the dial stem and crown and we may be able to make an educated guess as to what might be a suitable replacement.
  17. If it don't run, its more fun. I at least like to get to the point where I put it in the "for spare parts" pile, so figuring out why "it don't run" keeps me amused for a while. I do have a couple of "well it kinda runs.. sort of.." watches that I will eventually figure out when I get more time to tinker with them, they are in the "on its final warning before it goes for spare parts" pile.
  18. Sounds like an entertaining way to spend the evening, where exactly in London do you go for a night out like that?
  19. If the dials are not aftermarket, they might actually make those watches more collectable rather than less.
  20. This cheap? I'm tempted to buy one, just to see how bad it is. The experiment will only cost US $0.99 or approximately £0.78... the only thing is, I'd have to walk around with my arm in a brown paper bag so nobody could see it. I'm on holiday at the moment, in India as it happens, and if I get a chance, I'm going to see if I can pick up a cheap HMT (or maybe two). I believe they used to grow them round here someplace.
  21. Maybe this is more to everyone's taste. It doesn't really count as my watch of the day though since it is still in transit, and in need of some TLC before I can wear it. On the plus side its not every day you get a watch named after you. Queue the 'I didn't know your name was "The Hatton"' .. quips. It easily blew my 404 budget I must confess.
  22. I'm no expert, but that looks very similar to a clock my grandmother had, which would have been late Victorian (1890s from memory), so it is possible yours is a little earlier. I'm sure someone here could narrow down the date a little better, but you may need to get some close up pictures of the works. Particularly the regulator/pendulum and the striking mechanism. This may require you to remove the clock from the case, if you are comfortable doing this. This might be of interest. http://www.clockguy.com/SiteRelated/SiteReferencePages/GustavBeckerHistory.html
  23. Since the objects you are polishing are relatively small, you could fabri-coble together a small polishing machine using a 12V motor with built in gearbox. Something like this (search ebay for motor 1000 rpm, for lots of other ideas). https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/DC-3V-6V-12V-N20-Micro-Gear-Box-Geared-Motor-Speed-Reduction-Motor-Electric-HL/163064234690?hash=item25f762c2c2:m:mGGGwyKyZWTloM7wviCPQDQ:rk:1:pf:0 Most Dremel type tools have some sort of speed controller, which often lets you go pretty slow, but there is usually a trade off between power and speed. Also try searching ebay
  24. Introducing the latest prospective candidate for the 404 club, winging its way to me from the darker corners of the internet. This is a USSR "Zaria", which cost a whopping £0.99p (you know you are scraping the barrel when the watch cots twice as much to post as it does to purchase). It is clearly missing its winding stem, so if anybody knows where to obtain one, and/or can identify the calibre let me know.
  25. Very elegant. A whole lot more subtle than my "golden boy".
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