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Jon

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  1. Haha
    Jon reacted to Nucejoe in Converting an automatic watch to be hand winding - How to modify the mainspring?   
    Just take the selfwinder out and you are done.
    If barrel discharges power at low wind, that is an issue onto itself, breaking grease and some tricks would improve the power reserve.
    Inspired I just might cut my car in half to come up with two motorcycles. 
    Just kidding Kaan.  
    Keep safe.
  2. Like
    Jon got a reaction from Rocket in Adolf Schild AS 1916 SUMMIT Watch CO   
    Great video! I enjoyed watching you disassemble the watch.
    If you're asking for comments and feedback, there are two things I would say...
    You might find it easier and less likely to damage the movement or lose parts by putting the parts tray closer and to the side, as you are reaching over the movement to put the parts away .
    One more thing is, get some descent tweezers. It'll make the process much easier and far more enjoyable with good tools. Yes, you can take apart and assemble with cheap tweezers, but you'll be surprised when you use a quality pair how the experience is totally different. Get a piece of folded over 1000 grit wet & dry paper with water and give the insides of the gripping face of the tweezers a slight brushed finish as you squeeze them together and draw the wet and dry through. It'll make gripping a different story as well! 
    Apart from that, good job! Keep it up and look forward to seeing more of your work...
  3. Like
    Jon got a reaction from CaptCalvin in Supercharged Seiko NH35   
    Nicely done!
    Chalk and cheese when it comes to the timegrapher readings as well.
    Getting towards COSC territory in the timing. 
  4. Like
    Jon reacted to clockboy in Help with diagnosis: Dial up vs. dial down performance after service   
    Dial Up & Dial down variances I have found is usually is either too much end shake or the the H/S is not flat . I would would check the end shake and if OK re-clean the balance assembly and re-lube the cap jewels. 
  5. Like
    Jon got a reaction from VWatchie in Help foe Hairspring issue   
    Come on guys!... 2fancy has a problem with his hairspring, so it's not about who is ultimately right.
    Personally I try not to make absolute statements to say something 'can't be done' as someone will prove otherwise.
    I like to get the hairspring off the balance cock, so just the hairspring, collet and stud are present, then I'll see just how out of round it is.
    I place the hairspring on top of the balance cock, position the stud over the stud carrier and the collet in the centre of the jewel and see if the hairsprings outer curve marries up with the regulator pins. I get a good idea what needs tweaking then.
    Personally, I would try removing the hairspring collet from the balance staff, regardless of what I'm told can or can't be done. The experience of it is worth the cost of a donor balance 
  6. Like
    Jon reacted to CaptCalvin in Help foe Hairspring issue   
    It was not my intention to butt heads with anyone or derail the topic. I don't frequent this board nor contribute (which I plan on rectifying soon) as much as some of you and I have nothing but the highest of respect for those that do, and I understand @jdm to be one of them. I hope there to not be any hard feelings nor any animosity going forward.
  7. Like
    Jon got a reaction from CaptCalvin in Help foe Hairspring issue   
    Come on guys!... 2fancy has a problem with his hairspring, so it's not about who is ultimately right.
    Personally I try not to make absolute statements to say something 'can't be done' as someone will prove otherwise.
    I like to get the hairspring off the balance cock, so just the hairspring, collet and stud are present, then I'll see just how out of round it is.
    I place the hairspring on top of the balance cock, position the stud over the stud carrier and the collet in the centre of the jewel and see if the hairsprings outer curve marries up with the regulator pins. I get a good idea what needs tweaking then.
    Personally, I would try removing the hairspring collet from the balance staff, regardless of what I'm told can or can't be done. The experience of it is worth the cost of a donor balance 
  8. Like
    Jon reacted to VWatchie in Help foe Hairspring issue   
    I had a HS looking similar to this (I guess) and was very much helped by this post by @nickelsilver. Not saying that's all you need to do, but might come handy at a later stage. Good luck!
  9. Like
    Jon got a reaction from watchweasol in Back case trouble   
    I had a similar thing happen to me with a 9 ct case and snap back. Some metal was shaved off and it didn't snap on anymore.
    I took it to a guy in Hatton Garden, London last week and he fixed it for me. It wasn't easy, but he reshaped the back of the case slightly and built it up with a little more gold. I was really impressed. If you want his contact details, message me. What drew me to him was on his website he said "No repair is impossible". Which I thought was a bold statement, but liked that attitude.
    I like to fix most things myself, but sometimes more damage can be done, if I don't know my limitations. In this case (pardon the pun) I knew I needed some help from someone who has experience with these problems.
    Good fortune with repairing it..
  10. Like
    Jon reacted to HectorLooi in Regulator arm tool   
    Is it just me or do any of you also experience difficulty making fine adjustments of the regulator arm and hairspring stud position arm. Some of these are so stiff that when you apply enough force to overcome the static friction, it moves more than intended.
    Recently I made 2 tools that are a tremendous help to me. The 1st one is made from an old screwdriver. The 2nd one is made from an old iron nail. I just put the regulator between the fork of the tool and torque it. I can look at the screen of the timegrapher while making adjustments, without fear of slipping and damaging the hairspring.



  11. Haha
    Jon reacted to luiazazrambo in Watch cleaning machine not cleaning well   
    I have never ever used a watch cleaning machine in my life yet. I have to resurrect my National Watch Cleaning Machine you can see above first. Its going to be slow as I have a very limited time, but I am preparing it slowly. Bought a roll of 2 mm thick cork yesterday for jar lid seal and I am in a hunt for black and white, cloth covered, 3 cores cable. Seems that everybody wants black and white for some reason. I am also going for a holiday/ remote working session so I will be without my precious toys for a month or so! What a nightmare!!! 
  12. Like
    Jon got a reaction from MrRoundel in Watch cleaning machine not cleaning well   
    I sorted my problem of the residue by changing my cleaning fluid and rinse. I now use 'Fine Clean' and 'Fine Rinse' by a company called 'Quadralene' https://quadralene.com/
    They don't advertise it and you can't buy it directly from their website, you have to call them. The great thing is you get 5 litre containers, instead of 3.8 litres that L & R sell and it is a lot cheaper. I think it works out about £70 with delivery, whereas L & R fluids will cost over £100 and you get 20% less fluid. No brainer!
    It's non ammoniated, but works a dream
  13. Like
    Jon got a reaction from luiazazrambo in Watch cleaning machine not cleaning well   
    I sorted my problem of the residue by changing my cleaning fluid and rinse. I now use 'Fine Clean' and 'Fine Rinse' by a company called 'Quadralene' https://quadralene.com/
    They don't advertise it and you can't buy it directly from their website, you have to call them. The great thing is you get 5 litre containers, instead of 3.8 litres that L & R sell and it is a lot cheaper. I think it works out about £70 with delivery, whereas L & R fluids will cost over £100 and you get 20% less fluid. No brainer!
    It's non ammoniated, but works a dream
  14. Like
    Jon reacted to VWatchie in My First Service: Raketa 2609 HA - Questions, questions   
    If you suspect the plating to loosen within the barrel I would refrain from using it or try to get the plating off completely. Inspect the lid from one of your other barrels and if you find one that looks better I suggest you use it instead.
    I've been experimenting a fair bit with cleaning and have found that the most efficient way to clean "large parts" such as the barrel, the main plate, and the bridges (and sometimes the pallet cock) is to use a good washing-up liquid, a dense soft toothbrush and as warm water as you can endure. You will be amazed by the result! Before this I let the parts soak in naphtha over night. I only use IPA to get rid of naphtha and water. So, just a quick rinse in IPA (a minute or so) not to dissolve any shellac.
    I just love Russian movements but haven't done any Raketa yet (just Vostok and Poljot), so please keep us updated on your progress.
  15. Like
    Jon reacted to watchweasol in My First Service: Raketa 2609 HA - Questions, questions   
    Hi  As VWatchie says either remove all the flaking plate or dump the barrel for another. I either use carburettor cleaner or brake cleaner to de grease and clean then an IPA rinse works ok for me.
  16. Like
    Jon got a reaction from VWatchie in Dreaded Fixed stud beat correction. Trial and error?   
    If you find turning the hairspring collet in situ, as watchweasol said, you may find it easier to remove the balance from the cock.

  17. Like
    Jon reacted to Philbird in So how do I deal with a strip down so that the rebuild works?   
    I've found that having a practical understanding of movement function and construction (such as what you learn in Mark's fantastic course) is extremely helpful. If you know the parts of the movement and keep your screws organized, you should be good to go.

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk


  18. Like
    Jon reacted to jdm in So how do I deal with a strip down so that the rebuild works?   
    All techniques help but remember the most important one is good use of your eyes and brain. A good watchmaker is able to put back together a chronograph movement take to parts in a can, without much difficulties.
    Take out the screw, (or any other part) look at it, ask yourself why it has this shape / length / peculiarities?
    You will find that very rarely the manufacturer made illogical choices. What made sense to them, must make sens to you now.
    The difference between understanding how it works and why, and repeating without making sense of things.
  19. Like
    Jon got a reaction from VWatchie in So how do I deal with a strip down so that the rebuild works?   
    Sorting various parts that go together, like putting the keyless work together in mini baskets, so when you do put all your clean keyless work back in the same compartment together ready for replacing, you know only those screws are for that area of the watch and can't possibly go anywhere else. The more practice you get, you'll get to the point where all the screws and springs will go into a mini-basket together, because you'll know the movement intimately and where each screw and part goes, but that takes taking lots of photos first.
  20. Like
    Jon reacted to yankeedog in So how do I deal with a strip down so that the rebuild works?   
    pictures and practice and patience, Watches are like a puzzle , they only go together one way.
  21. Like
    Jon reacted to yankeedog in So how do I deal with a strip down so that the rebuild works?   
    In  simple three hand jeweled watch there really are not many parts.  Each has a unique function and really wont work in any other spot than the one intended. Adding complications such as day and date, just makes them more complicated, but the same thing hold true. Other than screws nothing can really be interchanged.
  22. Like
    Jon reacted to VWatchie in So how do I deal with a strip down so that the rebuild works?   
    I agree with @yankeedog. The way I do it is take lots and lots of pictures using my iPhone 6S with a $10 clip-on macro lens. That way I really don't have to care how I organize the parts in my trays and on a coffee filter with a glass bowl in top. Although I do place all screws together and large parts together, and keep track of which cap jewel and goes into the balance and which one goes into the main plate (they are sometimes different thicknesses). I guess I've developed a system, but more out of experience than out thinking it through. Here's and example of what I mean by lots and lots of pictures:
     
  23. Thanks
    Jon got a reaction from Fraczish in Dreaded Fixed stud beat correction. Trial and error?   
    If you find turning the hairspring collet in situ, as watchweasol said, you may find it easier to remove the balance from the cock.

  24. Like
    Jon got a reaction from watchweasol in Dreaded Fixed stud beat correction. Trial and error?   
    If you find turning the hairspring collet in situ, as watchweasol said, you may find it easier to remove the balance from the cock.

  25. Like
    Jon got a reaction from CaptCalvin in Rate difference between flat and hanging   
    Spot on!
    It only needs to be out a fraction and that's where those few seconds are gained or lost.
    Personally, 5 seconds between vertical and horizontal is good for me. Because it is really 2.5 seconds difference. So let's say you gain 2.5 seconds on vertical and lose 2.5 seconds on the horizontal reading, that's a total of 5 seconds difference. Or am I missing something @CaptCalvin?
    2.5 seconds difference statically on a timegrapher, may be something less on the wrist. I concur about timing 7750's, which I have found amazing to regulate and adjust. The one I'm wearing gains 30 seconds a month... Perfect!
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