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Ilike2rolexmoveit

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About Ilike2rolexmoveit

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  • Birthday 03/04/1985

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    Female
  • Location
    Minneapolis, MN
  • Interests
    Besides horology;) Coin Collecting, Music, Photography, Travel, Cars, Horticulture, Skiing, Tennis, Golf, & Scubadiving

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  1. Manodero and anilv, Thanks so much for looking at my intro and commenting on my watch! I apologize for taking so long to respond here! I won’t let that happen again! I’m full blown committed to watchmaking these days and am actually going to switch careers and jump into watchmaking full time at the beginning of 2019. I’m so excited as I am so bored with being a software consultant for a large fortune 500 company, although it has repaid me with a comfortable life which I am truly greatful for. To answer your questions about how I made that dial I’ll list out the steps I took, but how you paint on the “Rolex oyster perpetual Datejust... superlative chronometer officially certified” is something that you will have to choose how to do on your own. You can have a dye made of the dial with the writing and use it as a trace, you can use an engraver and punch the letters a bit more into the dial so that when you paint your first layer you can still see the outline which is what I did. I’m sure there are several more ways. Step 1) if you are working with a Rolex dial and I suggest you do so so you can form this template, take a sheet of paper and trace the dial, at exactly each hour and each marked minute, draw a line from it on the paper so that at the end your paper looks like a sun with a bunch of rays but make sure you make the lines longer where the hour tacs are. Now take a compass tool and put the pin in the center of the dial and stretch the compass to the inner ring of the minutes tics. That is your distance that you need on your dial so make that ring on your template sheet. Do the same for the outer ring. 2) I took an engraving tool and went over the letters on the dial with it so that they were deeper set into the dial. I also went over carefully and this takes a long time.. the inner and outer rings of the minutes area and engraved each minute tic. 3) clear the dial by picking off the tacks and the Rolex crown insignia with a tweezers. Clear the paint by using solvent or by using a professional jeweling hand held polisher or sander if the dial is metal. Take a brass brush and lightly remove the metal. Make sure you do not go too deep. Try to make it as even as possible. 4) place a toothpick in the center of the dial, suspend the toothpick (I did it with a clamp that usually holds wires that need to be soldered), make sure no dust in on the dial, and spray acrylic spray paint onto the dial making sure to hit the dial from directly above and spray from 6-10 inches away. Make about two quick sprays and let it dry. Take a look and make sure no dust particulates are stuck in the paint. Also because you engraved the letter make sure you can still see them as the paint will be dented at the lettered spots. 5) use acrylic paint and micro brushes and paint the letters in. Do not paint in straight lines. Instead make small dots.. this takes practice to get right. Because the dial is a bit dented in those spots the letters will not look raised from the rest of the paint.. you wouldn’t think it mattered since you have to clear coat it at the end but it does make a bit of a difference to me. The small dots will Give you a better idea of how straight your line will be. Connect the dots when you’re confident of your line. You need to do this with a 15-20x loupe or a microscope. If you make a mistake you have to soak your dial in solvent and start again or decide to live with it. Let the letters dry overnight. 6) reaffix your dial with a toothpick in the center and suspend it. This time use a clear coat that a) dries fast b) is heat resistant c) will not yellow in the sun d) will not crack for many years. I use spraymax 2x glossy clear coat. Spray just once and let dry. 7) You can buy Rolex crown stickers and you can also use the original Rolex crown that was in the dial but if you do you need to put two pieces of peg wood into the holes of the spot where the crown is and work with them in the holes each time you spray. You can also purchase diamond sticker tacs for watch dials. I use these because it’s way easier than putting peg wood into each tack hole in the dial. Put the dial in your template and stick each diamond stick exactly where the hour markers are. It’s coming together now right! 8) I usually spray one more spray of clear coat onto the dial when I’m done setting the diamond stickers. This ensures me that the hour marker diamonds hand on tighter. This last spray must be thin however because you can get bubble type weird bunches of clear coat at the edge of the diamonds. Here is a picture of a dial I did with ticks but this took a really long time and I made a mistake when I was writing in the letters but I lived with it. Btw I’ve seen dials just like mine online actually for sale by an Asian company. They are not too expensive but the process of purchasing them is a pain. It’s a western union type of thing.. Personally I’m Leary of the whole western union deal but can see why it’s needed. (The dial is kind of oily sorry) I’ll write out instruction for printing dials tomorrow! Hope this helps. Again there are many ways to copy the letters and get them into the dial! You just have to research!
  2. I did that yes yes yes dance for a few minutes.. I was so excited.. and the yes dance was done with a loupe in my eye!
  3. Yes I watched his videos like a hawk and repeated the steps he took bit by bit. I didn’t have the hammer he had though so I used a rubber mallet.. that could be where the mistake was made. I have found though, through life in general and in every subject of practice, that the professional always makes it look easy. One shouldn’t expect to get it right every try when just starting. Anyhow, I bought that hammer and I never did get to remove that balance staff from that wheel completely, but I had another scraper and I was able to remove the staff correctly AND I reaffixed a staff to a balance with a (new to me) staking set that puts my old K&D to shame! I was in the basement where my work area is screaming YES YES YES and doing the body motions to follow.. well, my husband snuck down, took video with his cell and sent it to my closest friends... high five!
  4. Hey fellow watch techs and makers (hobbiests as well)! I am working on a Rolex 1575 and to skip over details here.. I have a new balance assembly that i am trying to install onto the balance cock correctly. The assembly is Rolex part 8106. When I unpackaged the assembly I tried mounting it to the balance cock and noticed that when I move the regulator pin while the balance is installed the coils of the hairspring bunch up from side to side depending on which way of course I move the regulator. To fix this I know that the terminal curve at least for a flat hairspring must be concentric and that the collet should remain in the center when moving the regulator. When remove the hairspring from the wheel and affix it to the cock and move the regulator.. it moves every which way. I’ve not affixed a brand new hairspring and balance to a balance cock of a Rolex in my servicing time. I’ve been certified online for servicing and fault finding so I do know the jargon, if anyone could write out some steps to take that would be awesome! This is the 9th Rolex 1575 I’ve serviced, but the first time one has needed a new balance assembly. (The old one had two timing screws super glued to the balance wheel, the super glue make a pancake out of the hairspring.. a stick together pancake.) the watch has been disassembled, cleaned, reoiled and is waiting for it’s balance. There are no other problems with the watch. I appreciate this guys! Merry Christmas to you all!
  5. Hey fellow watch techs and makers (hobbiests as well)! I am working on a Rolex 1575 and to skip over details here.. I have a new balance assembly that i am trying to install onto the balance cock correctly. The assembly is Rolex part 8106. When I unpackaged the assembly I tried mounting it to the balance cock and noticed that when I move the regulator pin while the balance is installed the coils of the hairspring bunch up from side to side depending on which way of course I move the regulator. To fix this I know that the terminal curve at least for a flat hairspring must be concentric and that the collet should remain in the center when moving the regulator. When remove the hairspring from the wheel and affix it to the cock and move the regulator.. it moves every which way. I’ve not affixed a brand new hairspring and balance to a balance cock of a Rolex in my servicing time. I’ve been certified online for servicing and fault finding so I do know the jargon, if anyone could write out some steps to take that would be awesome! This is the 9th Rolex 1575 I’ve serviced, but the first time one has needed a new balance assembly. (The old one had two timing screws super glued to the balance wheel, the super glue make a pancake out of the hairspring.. a stick together pancake.) the watch has been disassembled, cleaned, reoiled and is waiting for it’s balance. There are no other problems with the watch. I appreciate this guys! Merry Christmas to you all!
  6. Lastly when I loosened the balance cock screw the amplitude did not pick up. I check for rubbing anywhere.. like center wheel or pallet fork screws... there was none. I checked for end shake and felt there was perhaps too much which is why I’m giving it a new staff.
  7. However if replacing the balance staff doesn’t work, I’ll be back because then I will truly be stumped.
  8. Oh and 9501 on escapewheel teeth I think.. it says escarpment right on the bottle and 941 on the caps as it says caps right on the bottle case to remind people I guess. Even if reminded is not needed it’s nice to feel 1000% sure.
  9. Yes, the shock stones I removed one at a time as to not confuse them. So, they are in their correct order and we’re cleaned with one dip, oiled perfectly, springs are in perfect shape and closed. Last night I had a screaming match with the watch.. I did the screaming and the watch just sat and beat slowly.. this is after I took everything apart again, checked every jewel, every tooth, every pivot.. removed the hairspring, checked for kinks.. none.. checked the safety roller and impulse jewel, perfect.. thought the balance staff pivots looked very worn so I took out the platax tool.. roller is safe guys.. the balance staff is smushed right to the sink in the wheel.. took out the jeweling tool... got it out. Took a look at the wheel.. aaannnddd I somehow slightly dented one of the sides that meets in the middle where the staff sits.. I yelled at the watch more.. told it to rot in hell.. then started throwing junk parts from my box and found a balance wheel for this movement!! No way I thought.. heavenly sun beams hit the new wheel I’m sure.. now I’ve got my used staking set out.. the one punch missing is one I need.. fml.. oh well.. I’ll get this done.. I’ll figure it out but thank you for your replies.. deeply.. you guys have helped a lot of movements survive by bringing me new ideas just be reading these threads.
  10. So I was removing a balance staff with broken pivots, btw hi I’m new here but not new... I read this forum all the time and received marks certifications in servicing and fault finding.. the watch I’m working on is an old omega 30T2. So, the roller removal went perfectly, I flipped the balance wheel over and lined it all up in the correct hole and all it did was break the staff up to the wheel and flatten where the sink is. I can push the stake no further. So, I’m guessing it’s jeweling tool time? If so should I use the pointy rivots, or a conical shaped thingy to get the rest out? Any advice would be most appreciated! Huge Thanks to you all for just reading so many different questions and answers on here has helped me so much in the past that I haven’t had to post much!!
  11. Did we ever check for magnetization here? It’s a simple reason that could lead to a snow graph or timing problems! Fitting a jewel where a jewel never was seems like the last thing I would do if all other fault finding steps were checked.
  12. I’ve cleaned and oiled this omega 30T2PC. Oils used were molykote on the canon pinion, 9010 (9410?) on the train, D5 on the keyless, 9501 on the escapement and pallet jewels, 941 on the shock jewels. I replaced the escape wheel with an omega of the same caliber I had in my scrap drawer. The train test was done and all was working perfectly.. escape wheel spinning away.. put on the pallet fork.. moved it between banking pins freely with a little wind. I put on the balance cock and get a very low amplitude. Very low. I can see the balance pivots are healthy.. but can’t seem to figure out this low amplitude.. I haven’t even put it on the timegrapher because it’s just so low. All the escape wheel teeth are healthy.. the air spring looks like it’s tightly coiled on the right side but more spread out on the left side. I made sure the pallet fork was at the right side banking pin before putting the balance cock into place. Any ideas here? I lived the escape wheel teeth.. then cleaned and reapplied oil to the entry and exit stones.. no idea why I could be getting such low amplitude.. when I screw down the balance cock screw, I have no movement of the balance wheel at all. I am sure the at least the lower pivot is in place. I’ve never had a problem like this before. Thanks all all for any advice.. maybe I should reclean the shock jewels and balance in a one dip? I’m going to try this next. I’ve seen also a video mark made about making a little dibbit with a screwdriver where the balance cock sits in place.. he did this for a Unitas 6947 I think. Then his balance caught up.. I guess I could try this too.. think I’m on the correct path here?
  13. Hello from this frozen tundra called Minneapolis, Minnesota. My name is Chantal, I’m 35, and I’m the only female I know that likes to work on watches. I started to really love watches about 5 years ago. I think the action of flashing a wrist with vintage watch makes a strong positive statement about a person. That’s just my interest in what’s surface. The mechanics behind are what really interests me. I’ve always been the type to discover how things work and your service videos have helped me so dang much. I’ve watched probably a dozen of your videos that were at some point relative. Your servicing a mechanical and an automatic watch videos are ones I’ve viewed maybe a dozen times. I fix my friends watches now. When it comes to super hard fixes I am no master. End shake makes me shake with fear that i will screw that shelac up! But crystal changes and general servicing has been fun. I own about 7 watches that range in age and price. Omega 30T2, an omega 601, a Tudor black bay 36, 2 rolex date just 1601’s with 1570 caliber movements, a shinola quartz, and a super interesting ora unica with the nova design. My absolute dream watch is a Rolex Stella with the peppermint dial. Also in my spare time I refinish dials. Most of the dials I’ve done are for the Rolex 1601 and I paint them in Stella colors. I can teach anyone how to do this if you want to learn. I can use any dial, weld new feet on them, and with a good printer you can make anything you want. Or you spray them with car paint and use some clear coat acrylic spray. There’s lots more involved but that’s the gist. Thank you Stewart though! You have helped me so much! Cheers, CAS
  14. Hello, first of all, because of your servicing videos I believe I can call myself an amateur horologist! You unknowingly helped me repair and service my great grandfathers Onega 30T2! You have helped create a new favorite (and expensive) past time!! 

    Currently, I’m working on a Rolex 1570 movement. Upon fitting a new crown I lost the action in the detent or set lever screw. The crown will go in and wind the watch but it will not change the time and of course it will not stay in. I have watched your videos about servicing a Rolex 3135 from start to finish. It just doesn’t help me though because it’s a push button crown release. I watched your service a mechanical watch because I knew the keyless would likely have a set lever screw for the crown but your video got blurry at the most crucial part. I hope to fix the issue dial side. I’ve got the dial and hands off, but I have not taken them calendar works off and I know I have to in order to see the clutch wheel and the rest of the keyless works. Right now on the underside I can see the clutch and the crown wheel aren’t engaging with one another. Why? Is setting lever not engaged with the clutch wheel or something? I personally wish you had a video where you show exactly how the detent screw works with a crown and the rest of the keyless works because not one exists on the net. I have books but they are written like 1970’s stereo instructions. Oh lastly, I can also tell the detent screw isn’t right because it turns and turns without ever tightening. A classic tell tale sign.. 

    however I made the dial o  this watch and it looks great! 

     

     

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