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  1. I have been practicing using my K&D staking set to become proficient in replacing balance staves. During tonight's practice, I tried to rivet and drive out the same staff from the same balance wheel a few times. After the the second iteration of this process I started to have a few troubles. I was able to drive the staff out (using K&D's No 50 staff remover), but I struggled to rivet it back in for some reason. It is almost as if the shape of either the wheel or the staff had changed. Once I riveted the staff into the wheel, I had a very, very hard time removing it. A bit perplexed I hit the staking punch with the brass hammer much harder than I usually would, this drove the staff out of the wheel but jammed it into the staking anvil's hole (took me a solid hour to remove the remains of the staff by using a shaped piece of pegwood). This left me wondering if on every iteration of setting in the staff, I was changing the shape of the balance or the wheel. I also noticed that the balance staff was getting stuck in the punches (domed punches) themselves (also after the second iteration). Could anybody help me out here in understanding what sort of mistakes I might have been making tonight? My guess is that I was not choosing the right size of domed/flat punches to rivet the staff.
  2. I am trying to get a replacement for an ETA 1080 balance complete. I have found a seller on eBay selling NOS Renata brand replacements. In the description for the balance complete, it states that it is for "Inca" (which I imagine to mean Incabloc) bridges. The ETA 1080 I have is not of the Incabloc variety. Would an "Inca" balance complete not be suitable for this ETA 1080?
  3. I am unable (can't find it) to source a replacement for a FEF 380/381 Balance Complete and was wondering if I could use another 11.5 (or even 10.5) lignes movement's balance complete as a replacement. What are the pro's/con's of doing this sort of franken-work. I know back in the day this practice was not frowned upon as much as it nowadays, but with a dwindling supply of parts I don't see what other options we hobbyist have.
  4. Using a very sharp knife followed by a case back knife seems to have worked: this was indeed a front-removed movement.
  5. This is my first watch repair after having fiddled with a bunch of old movements so I am a bit saddened that I am already stumped; maybe you guys can help me. I am trying to remove the movement from this Doxa's case. I have removed the case screws and the stem expecting the movement to fall right off. Unfortunately that doesn't seem to be enough to get this movement out. I have tried using a hand lever to very gently pry it out with no luck. I have read that some movements must be removed from the front by using a case back knife and popping the bezel out. I am not entirely sure if this is the approach to attempt on this Doxa. I'd like some confirmation before I damage the case accidentally. Here are the pictures of the Doxa, case and movement: https://photos.app.goo.gl/beTh0vEhQMxbrR2n2
  6. Hey all! A few years ago I inherited my grandfather's 1965 Rolex Date. Since then I have been fascinated by the intricate world of watches. A few months ago I got bit with the watch repair bug and I am finally taking apart and repairing watches tothe best of my ability. Unfortunately, some of these projects are a bit harder than I anticipated so I hope to get some help from y'all. Right now I am focusing on repairing vintage pieces with relatively simple movements. That being said I hope to build my skills in order to be able to repair all manner of watches.