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bluerich

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  1. The mainspring measured 1.25 x 0.12 x 390 x 10.48(barrel) and it doesn't match the one on JulesBorel. Cousins has a GR3148 that is close but obsolete. Closest they have is a GR3149 1.25 x .125 x 420 x 11 which I don't think will work so, I'll keep looking.
  2. Yes, it is an old timer jdm. I think I dated it to 1963 by the numbers on the inside of the case. I can reuse the barrel and haven't measured the mainspring yet but I know I can order by size as you suggest. I was curious about the mov't since I couldn't find any info & I've been pretty lucky looking up old mov't's that I come across. But you may have solved this for me rogart63. I didn't check Borel and went straight to my go to source which is Cousins. The link you sent does show SEK 851 and they have the mainspring listed for it. Once I measure the mainspring I'll compare to Borel and that may be it. Let you know and thanks so much.
  3. Hello to all. I'm working on a Seiko Champion 850 with a Seikosha 851 movement and I would like to replace the main spring and barrel. I looked on Cousins under branded parts but I didn't find Seikosha listed. I did see a post that seems to link it to Enicar 1010 but on Cousins data sheet the barrel cap looks different as it has a small cutout on the edge and mine is a solid cap all the way round the rim. Does anyone know if this movement went under a different name and calibre and where I can find parts under the name Seikosha? Also, there is the number 37 stamped under the balance but don't know if that has any meaning. I've posted pictures and any help is greatly appreciated.
  4. Thanks for all responses. Your JB weld method seems like a good way to go canthus. I have used this on other non-watch items and it holds well. I have seen videos on soldering dial feet and I think I've seen the one you mentioned watchweasol but have not tried it. You can see by the picture (if I did it right) that the dial tab is brass so it should be the same as soldering dial feet.
  5. Thanks dadistic for your tab bending tech. I have tried a variation of it with the goal of not bending at the point of contacting dial and it does work well. I did put too much pressure at that point when I broke the one tab and I could just feel it was going to happen. And thanks for the dial dot info too as this was another method I wondered about, And, AndyHull, I don't know what the dial is made of but I think it is brass. I'll take a closer look at it later. Thanks
  6. I've recently gotten interested in Timex electric watches after finding one at an estate sale. The watch is a 1979 model 262 and it needed a lot of help. The back plate was missing and the movement had been heavily oiled. I've picked up quite a bit of valuable information from all of the experienced people on the forum, in particular Jersey Mo. One thing I haven't seen is any posting on how to deal with the fragile tabs that hold the dial onto the movement. It seems a weakness in such otherwise robust watches. I thought I was finished with the model 262 I've been working on but I had to remove the dial again due to problems with the day/date changing. Sure enough, one of the tabs snapped off when I was putting the dial back on. Anyone have any advice on how to fix broken tabs or re-attach a Timex dial with a few (or all) tabs broken off? I thought of UV liquid plastic but I don't think it would hold for long. Seems like crazy glue or a bit of solder might work but then things can get sloppy pretty quickly. My current project is back together with 3 tabs and I'm sure will hold for now. thanks
  7. Thanks again Nucejoe. I finally got around to putting this movement back together, and now I'll take it apart again to clean and oil. Now I also have to find out why my old Hampden lever set stopped running dial up after it was last wound. Runs dial down and seems to have picked up a "clanging" noise.
  8. Does anyone have any information on an E Gluck 1213-21 17j movement? It is an Andre' Rivalle pocket watch. I have all the parts for cleaning oiling. It shouldn't be too hard to reassemble but any information on reassembly would be appreciated. These pictures identify the movement. Thanks to all
  9. Thanks so much for the advice. This is what I thought to do since I didn't see the watch running. I'm hoping it will run reasonably well as it does seem to have been treated roughly over the years.
  10. Currently working on a Gruen Guild, Semithin, 16 jewel, 12s that is in nice shape for it's age. Seemed like it was just dirty and dry but I've found what might be a problem with the banking pins. One of the pins is bent over quite a bit and has a gouge on the pallet fork side of the pin that pretty clearly shows it was bent over on purpose. The other pin looks a little bent too but not as much. I don't know if I should clean and lubricate the movement and see how (or if) it runs or try to straighten the bent pin while reassembling. The roller jewel seems to line up between the pins but the fork swings much further on the side with the bent pin. One thing I've never done, as I've pursued learning watch repair at my hobby level, is try to adjust banking pins on any other work I've done, and I have very little knowledge of checking the run to banking. The pins appear to be pressed in to the plate and not adjustable. Any help is greatly appreciated.
  11. After reading many posts I finally joined the forum last year and this is my first post. I'm a hobbyist in watch repair and got started about 4 years ago when the stem pulled out of my wife's Fossil watch and I couldn't get it back in. Fossil fixed it for no charge but it came out again later, and by this time I not only got it back in but fixed the bent part that was causing the problem. Everything I know I've learned from video's, books, this forum and others, Mark's course's and channel, and old watch repair courses I've found online. I buy old cheap watches and try to get them going again, with some success so far. This forum is one of the most helpful sites I've found. The amount of knowledge from members is amazing and I always seem to pick up some good information. I started with pocket watches, as is normal I think, and went on to wristwatches. Right now I've gone back to pocket watches and currently working on a Gruen Guild, Semithin that is in nice shape for it's age. Seemed like it was just dirty and dry but I've found what might be a problem with the banking pins. One of the pins is bent over quite a bit and has a gouge on the pallet fork side of the pin that pretty clearly shows it was bent over on purpose. I don't know if I should clean and lubricate the movement and see how (or if) it runs or try to straighten the bent pin while reassembling. The roller jewel seems to line up between the pins but the fork swings much further on the side with the bent pin. One thing I've not done is try to adjust banking pins on any other work I've done, and I have very little knowledge of checking the run to banking. Any help is greatly appreciated and I'm glad now to be in of the "talk" part of the Watch Repair Talk forum. I can't send pictures of the movement as I'm at a different computer but I can include them in a later post. Thanks
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