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centerwheel

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  1. One of the most important differences are the incabloc springs. They are incompatible between ETA and clones. So, if your spring pops up and flies away you can kiss your clone good bye. Happened to me on the first try. Clone makers do not sell parts, just complete movements.
  2. The one he's been working on, one that deals with complications, such as automatic winding, calendar, chronograph. It's been listed as Level 4, and it remains still in development. I will sign up as soon as it's released. I hope, it will not be the last one...
  3. I have enrolled in all of his courses. Still waiting for the last one (available only to patrons) to be released at some point...
  4. I can understand why Mark would skip lubing the mainspring. It's for the sake of making the video shorter and entertaining. Fine, he is the boss :). However, it wouldn't cost to much if for our sake he could just mention the steps he's skipped because for so many of us his videos are not just entertainment but also/primarily a reference, instruction. Knowing what's skipped is almost as valuable as seeing it.
  5. Oiling the mainspring (after it was installed dry) makes sense. Still, Mark does not do it and I would like to know why.
  6. Thanks! I've seen Mark showing how he oils a mainspring of a hand winded watch, but I have not seen any showing him doing it on an automatic. He then shows all of the oiling spots, goes through them one by one, but never shows or mentions what he does to the mainspring. If I am wrong about it then I will stand corrected. Pre-oiling the mainspring, just like you do with the (lint-free) tissue paper, will cause, when the spring is wound with a mainspring winder, for the oil to spread up all the way to the place that should get no oil at all. There will be no way to prevent it.
  7. I've watched carefully all of Mark's videos of him servicing automatic watches. They all show how he puts breaking grease on the wall of the mainspring barrel, and that he oils the arbor in the places where it would touch the barrel top or bottom. However, it seems that the mainspring itself is mounted "dry", and no oil is applied to it prior to the closing of the barrel. Does anyone know the reason he skips oiling the mainspring? I would like to it the way he does it but I would also like to know why he chose to do it with no oiling of the spring. In other places, such as TimeZone, they recommend oiling technique to be used just prior to closing the barrel. One must be then careful so the oil does not get on the wall and affect power reserve.
  8. Thanks for the suggestion. I agree that the pallets oiling might have caused this. Either too much or not enough oil. I used Moebius 9415 applied to the impulse face of the entry and exit pallets. I let then the movement run for a few minutes, then took the pallets off and clean it before reinstalling. Question: How do you apply lube on an escape wheel while the movement is running? I've never seen it done.
  9. I am doing service on a ETA 2836-2 (Sellita 220-1) movement. This is to practice, the movement is new. At this stage I have the movement still without calendar and without automatic winding. Everything has been cleaned, oiled, the pallets oiled then cleaned again. Mainspring removed, cleaned, breaking grease applied to barrel sidewall, mainspring put back (using wider), and finally oiled in the barrel. The arbor bearings were oiled, as well as the barrel bearings. The problem is low amplitude. The photo is for a fully wound watch in dial down position. The dial up shows the amplitude dropping to 170 degrees, which is 29 degrees less than dial down. I am thinking that this may be balance related. Should I take the balance out, clean it, clean the balance jewels, oil them, and see if this helps? Any other suggestion would be also very appreciated.
  10. There is a Jasco made Naphta sold in hw home improvement stores in the US. It's described as being the thinner for varnish and enamel. It also says that it cleans greasy, waxy, oily surfaces and machine parts. Would this be safe to use on watch parts including balance complete?
  11. Does it matter that Ronsonol, having been acquired by Zippo, seems to not contain Naphta anymore? There is now no mention of "Naphta" anywhere on the bottle. It only says "Contains Light Petroleum Destillate". Does the new product work as well as the old one did?
  12. Thank you! This procedure would work great! I am happy to learn that my fear of "unprotected" pivot damage was not supported by the experience and the courses you took. I will follow it in the future.
  13. My cleaning machine is Elma (Elmasolvex SE), a mechanical cleaning machine. Mark L. recommends to clean in the machine the balance complete (installed on the main plate) with the upper and lower jewels (including caps) mounted in their Incabloc blocks. The reason given is to protect the balance pivots during the clean & rinse cycles. Later the jewels would be disassembled, cleaned in a One Dip, oiled, and reassembled. But this procedure will almost ensure that the balance wheel pivots will not be cleaned because they are sitting inside their respective jewels, nor will the Incabloc blocks get cleaned because the chatons are sitting tightly inside them. Nowhere could I find how those would get cleaned later. Is this something to worry about? They would get full cleaning if the jewels were removed prior to going into cleaning basket. But then, how about those pivots? Would they really get damaged? What works best?
  14. On an automatic, I think, you need a breaking oil on the barrel walls. Perhaps 8217 would be a good choice.
  15. I had a problem like this one and it was due to a bent pivot of one of the train wheels.
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