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PadraicB

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PadraicB last won the day on October 18 2014

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About PadraicB

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    WRT Addict
  • Birthday 01/01/1979

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    Dublin, Ireland

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  1. Dial has something interesting, it notes "Jemaflex". A google search later, and it appears to be a method of adding flexibility to the balance wheel as shock protection for the pivots. Apparently related to Wyler's Incaflex. Stab in the dark but turns up often as a comparison.
  2. Mark re-attaches the balance to the plate prior to cleaning in his videos, and the manually cleans the jewels after. Whipping around a liquid bath seems more violent and sitting stationary in an ultrasonic cleaner so I'd assume it's safe.
  3. I've had some fun since yesterday hunting down parts for a 1945 Bulova 10BAC movement which I've started looking into repairing/restoring. The third wheel was missing and the tension springs were too. Picked it up for a reasonably low price so there's room in the budget! Unfortunately, after looking up the darn thing in the 1952 bulova interchangeable parts catelog, it's one of those unique movements which doesn't share a lot of parts with any other movements so you literally must have either another 10BAC movement or a NOS supply, so I ended up locating the one and only Google findable #91 Upper C.S. Third Wheel on Ofrei.com which also had the tension springs in stock. I'll also need a new crystal, sweep seconds hand, correct crown for this model and a nice strap. Appears to have been a real production model at the time but model name is unknown. Too small to be a military style watch though the dial still suggests an air navigation origin. I spent hours yesterday running down options for this, and several other Bulova watches. It's fun in a way. Anyone else sinking ridiculous hours into parts finding? Here's a complete one in excellent condition from http://www.mybulova.com/watches/1945-unknown-4206 : Let's say mine is a slightly less clean though the dial looks perfectly fine and the blued hands are intact and clean ;).
  4. I'm just done with the quartz wall clocks and talking my Dad through adjusting his pre-smartphone era Motorola flip phone ;). In this day and age... The only timepieces which adjusted themselves was my iPhone and the PC.
  5. It's amazing how much dust can accumulate just on the work mat over time here. It's not a dusty old room - it's a modern house and the room was cleared out and cleaned mere months ago - but the stuff gets around.
  6. I've come across this type of variety before, and it's usually the same movement layout for the wheels, balance and even screws, but with variations in the bridge shapes. This looks far worse, since the Dogma seems to have 21 jewels versus the usual 15. Perhaps these are all stock ETA 853 parts but with in-house bridges? Looking online, a lot of these Dogmas have amazing dials: http://forums.watchuseek.com/f11/dogma-spectacular-dial-511307.html http://en.todocoleccion.net/dogma-15j-calibre-eta-853~x25849547 I'm not sure of that red 21 is on the dial or the crystal... I hope the crystal!
  7. X-ray's won't harm your watch. At the end of the day, it's just a different wavelength of light (just sufficiently energetic to penetrate your body and play games with your DNA) and your watch has so far survived the Sun ;). You're already being bombarded by x-rays everyday as normal background radiation. To put it in perspective, a typical visit for a hospital x-ray scan (not a CT which is off the scale in comparison!) amounts to about a week of normal background exposure.
  8. Trying to imagine a coat of Seiko 7N36-6A40's... How would you ever keep them all synchronised? :P
  9. The three that spring to mind would be the ever-present G-Shocks, followed by the Suunto and Luminox brands. That assumes you are not diving to the Marianas Trench or taking on an Abrams tank. There's no shortage out there depending on budget and activities. So arguably, your Seiko is just as valid an entry if it can take abuse and keep on ticking and not cost an absolutely ridiculous amount of money...
  10. It's not blu-tac - rodico feels more like a lightly sticky clay while blu-tac is a very sticky plastic-like material. I also doubt blu-tac has anything like rodico's absorbency. The Bergeon rodico I'm using (which is NOT the premium variation also from Bergeon) is a light green colour.
  11. I've scrounged the Internet looking for cheap sets but I think it requires a bit of luck or a lot of persistence. I went for the Schilling set myself. That Larry's Watch page has one of those - possibly even a nicer set for $99. If anyone looking for a set finds them a lot cheaper, and assuming in good usable condition, just get them before someone else spots them.
  12. True. But, keeping with the cheaper options (incl. customs/VAT from US): £71: Schilling Bracelet Winders: Set of 7 in sizes 6mm to 10mm http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/A-Schilling-Bracelet-Watch-Mainspring-winder-Set-Watch-Craft-Marshall-Style-/231356758602?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item35ddeffa4a £102: K&D 123X-3: Three adjustable winders covering 4-6mm, 5-8mm, and 8-11mm (from the cross-over, this might not be entirely accurate). http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/A-Kendrick-Davis-Co-Set-of-3-No-123X-3-Adjustable-Mainspring-Winders-123-/331342897028?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4d25935f84 £130: Watch-Craft: Set of 8 in sizes 5mm to 10mm. http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Nice-Watch-Craft-Bracelet-Watch-Mainspring-winder-Set-Schilling-C-E-Marshall-/231356995010?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item35ddf395c2 Tempted to just get the cheap Schilling and give it a go. I can always sell them on if it doesn't work out to get back some of the cost. Probably less of a pain than adjusting the K&D ones, since adjustables do not appear to have ruled the market so far, presumably for a good reason. Very similar to the Watch-Craft winders but half the price.
  13. I've read elsewhere that it's not risk free by hand - ignoring the idea of a wound spring sitting close to one's face ;), there's also the possibility of kinking the spring or putting a twist on it so that it rubs against the barrel bottom or top instead of floating between the two. Probably most likely with folk like me who are a danger to anything we set our eyes on in watchmaking :P.
  14. Then again, I just spotted a Bergeon set that went for close to £260. Seems the Watch-Craft are a fair bit cheaper overall... Checking the non-local ebay sites to find a few more samples. Looking at older forum posts elsewhere, the prices have gone up in the past year or two for used winder tools.
  15. So, I'm on the market for a set of mainspring winders and I had a few questions. The main options I can see, in terms of second hand or used, winding tools seem to revolve around: 1. Watch-Craft Bracelet Winders: Sets of 8 in sizes 5mm to 10mm. 2. Bergeon 2729 Winders: Single handle; set of 7 barrels in sizes 0 (5.6mm) to 6 (9.8mm). 3. JC Schilling Bracelet Winders: Much the same as the Watch-Craft ones. 4. K&D 123/128 Winders: Set of 7 barrels and bench vise base. Their sizes tend to be vague but the 128 seems to start from 8mm. I suppose the worry with 1-3, is how likely is it to need anything larger than 10mm, and how to deal with any left handed mainsprings? Any recommendations or advice? If it helps, I intend working on vintage watches which will primarily date prior to 1970s, so I'm hoping the 10mm upper size on most of these is not an issue for a beginner green looking newbie like me ;). At present, leaning towards the Bergeon though the Watch-Craft's are more readily available from the US (which makes them more expensive as it happens if you throw on customs + VAT).
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