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Blubarb

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  1. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to AdamC in Power reserve question?   
    Depends how active the wearer is. I would have thought someone regularly on the move would keep it +/- 90% powered. The converse is true. At 25% reserve it may still keep good time but if anything would surely slow down if anything as the power ebbs away.


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  2. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to Marc in Power reserve question?   
    Actually as the power reserve gets low the principal impact on the balance is on amplitude which drops considerably.
    Counterintuitively this can actually result in an increase in rate and the watch can speed up as the power reserve gets very low, although I've never quite worked out the mechanism behind this effect, but I have observed it. I suspect that it is due to the relationship between momentum, static friction, and dynamic friction breaking down at very low amplitudes and energy levels and the impact that this has on the oscillating system.
    The degree to which this effect can be observed will also vary from watch to watch depending on how much clearance there is between the curb pin and the boot on the regulator. In an ideal world the gap between the two will be exactly equal to the thickness of the hair spring resulting in the H/S being always in contact with one or the other and the effective H/S length remaining constant throughout each balance oscillation.
    In reality the clearance is usually slightly greater than the thickness of the H/S which means that for a fraction of the balance rotation the H/S is not in contact with either boot or curb pin and the effective length of the H/S increases to its full length. With good amplitude the impact that this has on timing is insignificant but as the amplitude decreases with reduced power from the M/S the proportion of the balance swing that is on the full H/S length rather than the regulated H/S length increases and the effect that this has on slowing the rate increases. Also the greater the gap between the curb pin and the boot the greater this effect will be.
    This will obviously counter any increase in the rate that may result from the very low amplitude resulting from low M/S power.
    I guess what I'm trying to say is that the exact impact on rate as M/S power reduces is almost impossible to predict as there are at least two mechanisms in play which counter each other to variable degres.
    A rotor can in theory keep the main spring fully wound all the time if it is continually moving at an appropriate rate and in the right direction (remember not all auto winding systems are bi-directional), and the autowinding system is in an appropriate state of repair.
    As @AdamC says though it is highly dependent on the level of activity of the wearer.
    For a real life example though I have a Vostock Amphibia with a 2416b auto-wind movement. This has a quick set date that requires cycling back and through the midnight point to correct the date if required, and becaouse of the wobbly crown characteristic of the Amphibia this is a PITA so I keep it on a winder when not wearing it. The winder rotates for 1 hour in every 4 at about 9rpm. Left on this winder for over two weeks at a time this watch has never stopped so I would suggest that the input from the winder is pretty close to the output of the watch running.
  3. Like
    Blubarb got a reaction from Mark in Is this clone ETA 6498-2 escape wheel staff broken   
    Thanks, Mark! 
  4. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to Mark in Is this clone ETA 6498-2 escape wheel staff broken   
    Bit of oil on the top pivot but...

  5. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to saswatch88 in Is this clone ETA 6498-2 escape wheel staff broken   
    yes both upper and lower pivots are broken
  6. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to Nucejoe in hands when in place are stopping the wheel train?   
    I checked all variations listed by Dr ranfft.
    I think it is Movado75.  Later modified fitting incab shock protection. 
  7. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to rogart63 in hands when in place are stopping the wheel train?   
    Well spotted. 
  8. Haha
    Blubarb reacted to yankeedog in hands when in place are stopping the wheel train?   
    Calibrated eyeball...
  9. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to Nucejoe in hands when in place are stopping the wheel train?   
    Straigthening in place( the movement) is not recommendable, you risk bending the pivot backward facing structural fatigue, damgaing the jewel, slip and break..etc.
    I remove the wheel,  place the bent section of the pivot in between two hard flat srface and roll the pivot straight . No impact, no hammer nor heat, just press hard, slow, careful.
    While at it check the pivots axial end play, end shake, excessive end shake can unneccessarily let the bent section inside the jewel hole, in which case you may could adjust the bent section out of the jewel hole.
    Cool avatar there. 
    Good luck.
  10. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to Nucejoe in hands when in place are stopping the wheel train?   
    While at it , Check for worn out center hole, how about end and side shake on center wheels arbor? Runs real freely if center hole is worn out. A close up of center hole with canon pinion removed.
    Now that yankee said it, subsecond arbor appears bent to me too. Good time to check for bent subsecond is before fork is installed, when you can run gears fast.
    Any washer under dial is better than no washer.
     
     
     
     
  11. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to yankeedog in hands when in place are stopping the wheel train?   
    You have a sub second hand..is it my imagination or does that post look bent.
  12. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to rogart63 in hands when in place are stopping the wheel train?   
    I looked at ranfft and it was showing the movement that had a sweep second wheel and pinion . That why i thought so. Maybe the hour wheel is worn so it touch the minute wheel or the barrel .  Been there . 
  13. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to rogart63 in hands when in place are stopping the wheel train?   
    Does it have a sweepsecond pinion? Maybe that is binding or have some wear. 
  14. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to Nucejoe in hands when in place are stopping the wheel train?   
    Remove one hand at a time and observe.
    If a fault not found there, check if canon pinion drags on the mainplate.
     
     
     
     
  15. Like
    Blubarb got a reaction from rogart63 in hands when in place are stopping the wheel train?   
    No canon sweep pinion I can see.
    Canon pinion turning smoothly - should I grease between the mainplate and the canon pinion gear? 
    Missing dial washer?  



  16. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to Tmuir in Lubrication of stem and winding/sliding pinion?   
    The blue grease is Moebius 9501.
    I put it on the tip of the winding stem that fits in the hole in the movement plate and a tiny dot on all 4 sides of the square that the pinion slides up and down on and 1 or 2 dots on the teeth of the sliding pinion and 1 dot in the slot that the yoke sits in.
    Likewise a dot where the setting leaver locks in on the setting leaver spring.
    I use D5 for the pivots of the yoke and setting lever
  17. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to Tmuir in Lubrication of stem and winding/sliding pinion?   
    I usually use Moebius 9501 on winding stems and winding sliding pinion, but my notes also say Molycote DX can also be used so I would go with your Molycote.
    Use just the tiniest amounts, mark has videos of youtube showing how to apply it.
  18. Like
    Blubarb reacted to MrRoundel in Keyless works help   
    I would say that it is in the right position, on top of the winding pinion, and where it can be tightened into its recess on the stem. Put in the stem, tighten up the detent screw, and see if the stem holds in during manipulation between winding and setting. Good luck.
     
  19. Like
    Blubarb reacted to manodeoro in Keyless works help   
    As it really looks like a 157 caliber (pic below) I would say YES



    Envoyé de mon Moto G (5) Plus en utilisant Tapatalk


  20. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to canthus in Tech sheet for early Omega movement?   
    Found this for lubing a cal1154.  Probably using the oils shown in similar positions on an older watch would be OK.  I used these for a Cal-552 I did a year or so ago and it still going great. I used  Moebius HP1500 to replace D5.
    Omega 1154.pdf
  21. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to StuartBaker104 in Tech sheet for early Omega movement?   
    Given that this is a straightforward manual wind movement you may be better getting lubrication advice from here, which reflects the oils available today:
    http://www.nawcc-index.net/Articles/BTI-The_Practical_Lubrication_of_Clocks_and_Watches.pdf
     
  22. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to canthus in Tech sheet for early Omega movement?   
    Maybe this will help.
    365_Omega 552 NewLR.pdf
  23. Thanks
    Blubarb reacted to Delgetti in Tech sheet for early Omega movement?   
    Watchguy has some information I think (no oiling chart like ETA but there are advices in the text of some manuals):
    http://watchguy.co.uk/technical-instructions-service-manuals/
  24. Like
    Blubarb reacted to vinn3 in Vintage oilers - how do these operate?   
    good show!   I have seen them in action.  the above safety  measures were not used  the glass tube was filled with oil.  you can see the oil fill the jewel.  just don't suck,   vin
  25. Like
    Blubarb reacted to vinn3 in Vintage oilers - how do these operate?   
    not gravity or capillary,    with a rubber tube, in your mouth,  the was pushed oil into the jewel.  older jewelers concitered better than the pump style.   keep them,  they are valuable.  vin
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