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Tmuir

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Tmuir last won the day on February 13

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About Tmuir

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    Super WRT Addict
  • Birthday 01/05/1973

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Perth Western Australia
  • Interests
    Clocks & watches, vintage British motorcycles, toys and model steam engines....

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  1. It shouldn't need much pressure at all to fit it. If its not going down there must be a reason why. Has the tube on the hand been damaged or crimped from when you removed it? Can you fit it with the minute hand removed?
  2. Having a watch that can count your steps seems to be all the rage these days, so not wanting to seem to be out of touch with the latest fad I just purchased myself a step counting watch. Pictures from ebay as item not received yet. Am I missing the point a bit? Will certainly be something different to service.
  3. Tmuir

    Some new acquisitions!

    Very nice haul, I really want a pivot gauge like you just got.
  4. Tmuir

    Where was this movement made?

    Yee Gods!! The time you spend servicing that movement will be more than its worth. I'm going to guess China, or somewhere else in Asia
  5. Watch out when you remove the balance jewels for cleaning the shockproof spring is a real PITA to refit. The russian movements may not be the prettiest, but they are solidly built that's for sure.
  6. The blue grease is Moebius 9501. I put it on the tip of the winding stem that fits in the hole in the movement plate and a tiny dot on all 4 sides of the square that the pinion slides up and down on and 1 or 2 dots on the teeth of the sliding pinion and 1 dot in the slot that the yoke sits in. Likewise a dot where the setting leaver locks in on the setting leaver spring. I use D5 for the pivots of the yoke and setting lever
  7. I usually use Moebius 9501 on winding stems and winding sliding pinion, but my notes also say Molycote DX can also be used so I would go with your Molycote. Use just the tiniest amounts, mark has videos of youtube showing how to apply it.
  8. Tmuir

    broken mainspring

    You must remove the section of the spring the will become the loose bit before you heat the mainspring as heating the mainspring to red will anneal the spring steal so it can bend, not break. If you do not remove the bit of the spring that will become the loose bit first it would also be heated and annealed and then under tension in the barrel when the watch is would up it could buckle and let the mainspring go which would most likely damage the watch
  9. Tmuir

    broken mainspring

    Pages from the book that explain how to make a loose hook end for a mainspring
  10. Tmuir

    broken mainspring

    You could in theory fix it, but I would measure the mainspring and see if you can buy a replacement. They used to rivet the extra bit on, but now its usually spot welded, but in some older watches they just have a loose end mainspring hook, which you might be able to do for this spring if you can't find a replacement, but it would be tricky. W.J. Gazeley's book Watch and clock making and repairing explains how to do this. (1950s book). I will take a photo and post it from the book shortly.
  11. Tmuir

    Beginner - mechanism questions

    I think before anyone will be able to help you need to post full photos of the front and back of the movement so people can identify the movement.
  12. Tmuir

    Tool Identification and Use

    No worries, I've spent plenty of time just thumbing through the books reading about odd looking tools that the pictures have caught my eye, the Riveting thimble and stand being one of those tools, you won't regret buying it for $20. A lot
  13. Tmuir

    Tool Identification and Use

    From the 1902 edition of 'Watch and Clockmakers' Handbook Dictionary and Guide' by Britten. These books do turn up regulary on ebay as there have been many editions of it pribted and they are well worth getting to help identify old tools. I also have a 1938 edition of this book which is my favorite of all my reference books as my grandfather signed his name in the book in January 1944 when I assume he first got it.
  14. Tmuir

    Tool Identification and Use

    It's a pedestal stand and riveting stakes. It allows you to hold the stake with one finger and support the item with the rest of your hand. Basically it lets you do work that you would normally need a thirs hand for. That picture is showing a minute hand been driven onto a pocket watch. I'll take a photo of the page from Britten's Watch and Clockmakers handbook
  15. Tmuir

    Tame Side Fusee Clock in need of TLC

    For those interested here is a photo of the cracks in the barrel wall, you can see them extending out from both slots for holding the wire although the crack on the left side is not as visible it is cracked through the barrel too, hence why I Need to make a new barrel. My order of brass tube and 1.5mm brass sheet arrived today, as the biggest cost is the postage I ordered more than I need, enough to make 2 more barrels. I've got to wait for a cool day as its too hot to work in my workshop at the moment. I've never made a barrel from scratch before so it will be an interesting learning experience.
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