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dman2112

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dman2112 last won the day on May 1 2017

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About dman2112

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  1. Casing guide is your friend. Will show exploded view of case with all parts and gaskets Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  2. Yes. You have to remove the bezel to gain access to the crystal. Then you press the crystal out and the chapter ring will drop out. The crystal hold the chapter ring in. Check out the Seiko Watch forum at thewatchsite.com or google Seiko / citizen watch forum. Here you can download the Seiko casing guides Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  3. Its a 3.5X - 45X. It works just great. It has an 8" working distance and I use it for balance work and inspecting the mainplate and bridge jewels after cleaning. You can actually see through a cap jewel into the setting if the ultrasonic removed all the old oil (oil bubble) if there was one.
  4. Thanks. My spine thanks me Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  5. Update. I discovered an easy way. I just polish the outer diameter on my buffer that I use for case polishing. Very gentle and worked like a champ. I just spin the crystal around as I go and it remained perfectly concentric. I just kept checking with a caliper. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  6. Well after a year of building my skills and discovering good tools vs bad, I finally have a workspace that is comfortable and large enough to lay out all of my tools properly. A lot of advice I gleaned from Mark and this board so thanks to all Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  7. Nothing tried yet. But I was going to use a lathe chuck to hold the crystal and chuck it in a variable speed drill and spin it while holding a sanding stick to the edge. Have not validated the theory yet so can't recommend Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  8. I recently had the same issue. Following.... Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  9. Hmmm. That's interesting. I would email the historical guy at Glycine. Mine has "72" on the balance in gold lettering that matches to "Glycine" on the top plate. Mine is a free sprung balance. I had to make some minute "adjustments" to the pins when I regulated it. The email from Glycine states that the movement is "felsa 465". I also have a 465 from a "boulevard" watch that has a free spring balance that a pinched an hour wheel out of. Anyway I tried to help the OP and he wanted to know what the movement was and in my experience you'll be lucky to find another 72 but should be able to find a
  10. I also verified the cal 72 is a base 465 with the Glycine historical dept. you can email them and they will respond in a few days if you feel debate is still necessary Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  11. 465 has a free spring balance. It's a 465 Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  12. Here is my dial and hands re-lumed. On the dial I gently flicked off the radium into a water tank with a toothpick. The hands I just put in my ultrasonic. The relume was standard issue from there. I think it came out good and I won't glow :-) Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  13. Remember. And lume remaining on this watch will be radium. You should get rid of it and have it relumed Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  14. Now I saw your pics. Yes it's a Felsa 465 Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  15. The movement is a Felsa 465. Yours is a manual wind correct? Here is mine restored Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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