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rodabod

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  1. Like
    rodabod got a reaction from JohnR725 in Chipped Jewel cause of Low Amplitude?   
    That’s usually a screwless balance. Unlikely to have been put out of poise by material removal, but not impossible. 
     
    Compare dial-up to dial-down rate to see if it’s likely that the rate is being affected by the hairspring sticking. Also, does how is the amplitude when the rate drops in the other positions? Is it relatively favourable?
  2. Like
    rodabod got a reaction from watchweasol in Chipped Jewel cause of Low Amplitude?   
    That jewel is cracked. It's hard to see the train layout from your photo, but if the side-thrust pushes the pivot into the crack then it would very possibly reduce amplitude.
  3. Like
    rodabod got a reaction from markr in Tweezers   
    I reckon the Bergeon ones are probably made by Dumont. You can only develop your own preference by trying them , but these days I mainly alternate between a old pair of 3C and normal pair of 3 for "coarse work". I'd happily use a set of number 4 or 2 instead though. 
    Carbon steel or Dumostar is the way to go in my opinion. The Carbon steel ones are glass-hard.
  4. Thanks
    rodabod got a reaction from Nucejoe in Chipped Jewel cause of Low Amplitude?   
    That jewel is cracked. It's hard to see the train layout from your photo, but if the side-thrust pushes the pivot into the crack then it would very possibly reduce amplitude.
  5. Thanks
    rodabod got a reaction from Nucejoe in a service question.   
    That's not good enough, assuming you measured on a full wind with the correct parameters. I'd take that back.
    Be careful telling them that you used a timegrapher. Sometimes that causes the argument of "you think you know everything just because you are able to measure something". It may be easier to say that the timekeeping wasn't as good as expected and you had it measured by someone else.
  6. Like
    rodabod got a reaction from nickelsilver in L & R Varamatic Watch Cleaning machine   
    Hi, firstly, it's worth mentioning that these are absolutely fantastic machines and well worth renovating. It takes a while to get your head around their operation, but this is simpler when the two halves of the casing have been removed to allow you to observe the workings.
    One of the most common faults is synchronisation, which is when the main cam which sits underneath the turntable which holds the jars moves such that it is rotated slightly compared to the turntable position. However, it does not sound like you have this fault. The obvious symptom with this fault is that the turntable tries to move when the basket is either in the low position, or rising/lowering.
    You describe the basket as spending literally no time in each jar, despite the time duration knobs being set to maximum. This makes me wonder if the "timer assembly" unit has failed. Can you have a look at it? It's an odd device which is a simple switch which has a lever that's motorised which very closes very slowly. The knurled screws which adjust the timing length push the lever on the timer assembly open by varying amounts, and the further they are screwed in, the longer it takes the timer unit to close the switch.
  7. Like
    rodabod got a reaction from Fatcapp in L & R Varamatic Watch Cleaning machine   
    Hi, firstly, it's worth mentioning that these are absolutely fantastic machines and well worth renovating. It takes a while to get your head around their operation, but this is simpler when the two halves of the casing have been removed to allow you to observe the workings.
    One of the most common faults is synchronisation, which is when the main cam which sits underneath the turntable which holds the jars moves such that it is rotated slightly compared to the turntable position. However, it does not sound like you have this fault. The obvious symptom with this fault is that the turntable tries to move when the basket is either in the low position, or rising/lowering.
    You describe the basket as spending literally no time in each jar, despite the time duration knobs being set to maximum. This makes me wonder if the "timer assembly" unit has failed. Can you have a look at it? It's an odd device which is a simple switch which has a lever that's motorised which very closes very slowly. The knurled screws which adjust the timing length push the lever on the timer assembly open by varying amounts, and the further they are screwed in, the longer it takes the timer unit to close the switch.
  8. Like
    rodabod got a reaction from AdamC in New mainspring and Knocking   
    Yes. You do not want any spreading. There are many reasons for why it can happen, such as unclean surfaces (especially if there is a minuscule residue film of oil). It effectively causes as similar effect to the oil drying out as it just continues to migrate away from the bearings. Ironically, over-oiling can also cause this effect too if it creates a pathway for the oil to run away to. I've seen that on cap jewels where the oil has spread across the entire chaton and jewel hole, only leaving a thin film everywhere.
  9. Like
    rodabod reacted to JohnR725 in Watch Cleaning Solutions   
    if it's a modern watch with removable balance jewels I find it's best to put the balance wheel back into the watch screw down its bridge remove the balance jewels. Then you can run it through the ultrasonic just fine. otherwise I just put the balance complete a separate basket when I run it through the cleaning machine so nothing else bumps into it.
  10. Like
    rodabod reacted to VWatchie in Despite Kluber P125 this Orient/Seiko mainspring slips way too soon   
    Thanks for your input @rodabod!
    Yes I did, but in a different thread. Images here and as you can see, no hiccups in the train.  My conclusion (but I guess I could be wrong even if I don't think so) is that the bridle of the GR2378X spring just isn't compatible with certain Seiko (cal. 7S36) and Orient (cal. 46E40, 46943, etc) calibres. The GR bridle simply doesn't exert enough pressure on the barrel wall. As noted previously it is thinner and lacks the introductory and concluding dent of the Seiko/Orient spring.
    So, I've just installed an original but quite battered original Orient spring (the only one I was able to source on eBay) in the barrel. Preliminary results are a major improvement. The spring now slips after about 7 revolutions of the ratchet wheel compared to the 3.5-4 revolutions of the GR spring. Anyway, within a couple of days I should be able to report the actual power reserve measures in hours.
    The greed of the watch manufacturers are refusing to freely supply parts to hobbyists. To me personally it's beginning to kill the fun and in the long run possibly the hobby 
  11. Like
    rodabod reacted to luiazazrambo in Watch cleaning machine on the cheap   
    Found another way, vintage butter churn.  

  12. Like
    rodabod reacted to nickelsilver in Parting 316 Stainless Steel on the Lathe   
    That's 100% approved A-OK especially when needing to part something that's challenging the rigidity of a machine. If on a larger lathe best to put a block of wood under the cut or the saw can surprise you when it gets through and nick the bed (I do the saw trick with the lathe running). Just remember to reverse the spindle direction id using a jeweler's saw where the cut direction is opposite.
  13. Like
    rodabod got a reaction from AdamC in New mainspring and Knocking   
    Just to continue the point that Frank is describing, the thickness is your more likely issue here, as the difference between 0.11 and 0.10 is 10%...... and that difference is effectively cubed when it comes to calculating force. 
     
    1 cubed = 1
    1.1 cubed = 1.331
    That’s an increase of 33%
  14. Like
    rodabod reacted to Rocket in First watch project started   
    Ok, So the screwdrivers, tweezers ect arrived today. Could not wait to start! 
     
    Have got a Fortis as first project, that seems to come from a lot of sparepart watches. It has the FHF 96ST movement. Looks brand new, and was sold as a non runner. It is missing the stem. And the dial looked loose. 
    Pried up the case lid. And the movment fell out. So, I tried to wind the barrel a little with a screwdriver. No surplice there, It didn't run.  After a little closer look. I saw the balance jewel is missing. Also looked like the pivot might be broken. Bit exited, I started with removing the hands. Had little trouble there. The houerhand was pried to dial face. But after a little more fiddling than expected. I got it off. 
    For my life. I couldn't find the screws to the dial. Turns out it was glued on to the movement.. Even more intresting!   But got that off too, with little "fiddling" 
    Tried to get it running again. But noticed that the balance looked out of alignment. Time to bring out the new "chunky" Bergeon screwdrivers! (love them already) With a "some" intresting trying out different work positions, shifting between 4x and 10x loupe. Half scared to mess up the balance, possibly even more. Still exited. But with some fueling with the tweezers. Tha balance came out in one piece with the hair spring. Im not sure why its called hairspring. It sure is thinner than a hair..  After som try and tribulations with the loupe. I managed to notice that the lower pivot on the balance staff is ok. Had hard time to see if the upper pivot was existing. The hairspring is in the way. Im not sure how you guys do it? Im sure scared to mess up the hairspring! But eventually, I got a glimpse of it. 
    Looked at the fork and timing wheel. It seemd to want to "tick". So I decided to remount the balance again. Well..That took some time. Again very fiddly! First time, I got the impulse jewel out of alignment. Took me a while to figure out. And even more time to reassemble with it in alignment. But got it there on the second try. Im not telling you about how long it took..  
    With everything back. I I tried to "kick" the balance. Veeerrry carefully. It wanted to go!  With the missing to jewel in mind. I decided to give it "some" oil. Since it never has been up and running. It is probably very gummed up. So disassembly, cleaning and oiling have to be done anyway. So I thought it is the perfect first oiling effort, as I can clean upp my mess, anyway. 
    Oiling. Jeez.. Those jewels is tiny!! Let say.. Comparing on what Ive seen on turitorials ect. My jewels isn't missing any lube.. 
    But it started ticking!!!  It definitely isn't strong ticking. But an houer later, writing this. It is still ticking! Mezmerasing! I call this evening a success! 
     
    Some notes to self: 
    1. Im getting a bit shakier over the years. Loupes magnifies that too.. LOL! 
    2. Improve working position. Sitting on the floor isn't an option. So raising the office table some how, is needed. 
    3. I did like to use the loupe better without the head band. It was quicker to change between magnification. (have only 4x and 10x)
    4. Amongst many other things. A microscope is now on the wishlist for the future wallet enlightener list.  
    4. When doing close up work. Don´t poke the nose with the screwdrivers.(unintentional, or not). The new Bergeon screwdrivers will be offended!! 
    5. Somehow, I need to find a correct jewel, spring ect.  Find out if a jewel press is needed?. Hm. have to get a stem and crown too.
    6. The only thing I got top quality tool to start with. Was the Bergeon screwdrivers. As the first set "stuff" needed. Didn't come cheap any way. But Im happy I got quality screwdrivers. So Im pondering if the wife get upset if I have them on the night table! Hm!  
    7. Today was a great day! lets make tomorrow even better! 
    8. Tomorrow is disassembly day. Remember to take maaany pictures!! 
    9. Get some sleep! 
    /Johan
     









  15. Like
    rodabod got a reaction from nickelsilver in New mainspring and Knocking   
    Just to continue the point that Frank is describing, the thickness is your more likely issue here, as the difference between 0.11 and 0.10 is 10%...... and that difference is effectively cubed when it comes to calculating force. 
     
    1 cubed = 1
    1.1 cubed = 1.331
    That’s an increase of 33%
  16. Like
    rodabod reacted to praezis in New mainspring and Knocking   
    @AdamC 
    considering age and possible wear of your movement, your choice of a slightly thicker spring is intelligible. For a more modern, less wear movement I 'd chosen 0.10 rather and is what my calculator recommends.
    Nivarox/steel: strength changes in 3rd power with thickness, not linear. I suspect, needed decrease of thickness will be much less.
    @nickelsilver
    I buy from GR, too, but mostly the Inox variant. They have the same S-form as Nivarox springs. 
    Frank
     
  17. Thanks
    rodabod reacted to nickelsilver in New mainspring and Knocking   
    As for differences in strength between steel and modern alloys, there are a few things to consider.
     
    Elgin was the first to offer a modern alloy as a mainspring, Elgiloy, which is still used extensively in industry. Others followed, and nowadays we have most new springs coming from Generale Ressorts. They offer springs in two grades, stainless, or Nivaflex.
     
    There are a few properties that one would look for in a spring, first being "springiness" or strength, which boils down to Young's Modulus. Another would be durability, and another ease of manufacture.
     
    To see the differences of the common mainspring materials we have:
    Carbon steel- Young's modulus of 206, fairly durable
    Stainless steel- Young's modulus of around 190, quite durable
    Elgiloy- Young's modulus of 211, very durable
    Nivaflex- Young's modulus 221, very durable
     
    While Elgiloy is still used in industrial applications I don't think anyone is making watch mainsprings from it anymore. One of its particular qualities is that its point of plastic deformation is very good compared to other similar alloys. So you can have a spring that can be pushed further without deforming or breaking- no doubt one reason it was such a good mainspring.
     
    I don't think anyone makes carbon steel watch springs anymore, nor have for some time.
     
    Nivaflex is the #1 choice of manufacturers for new pieces. As seen above, it is significantly stronger than carbon steel, and even more so than stainless. I have noticed that replacing a carbon steel spring with a stainless spring of the same thickness is indeed a step back in power. Likewise, replacing a carbon steel or stainless spring with Nivaflex offers a boost in power. I order directly from GR, and always request Nivaflex specifically. In some cases if they only have stainless in stock I will look elsewhere for old stock.
     
    Bottom line is Nivaflex is stronger than carbon steel, stainless is weaker (as springs). Stainless springs will not have the reverse curve at the hook end like Nivaflex does, it will open up like a regular steel spring.
  18. Like
    rodabod got a reaction from AdamC in New mainspring and Knocking   
    A few bits of advice from my experiences with the same issue:
    Sometimes you can gauge how much the new spring is too strong if you can get it to run in a position where the amplitude drops (eg. crown down). Or perhaps it runs ok on a lower level of wind, eg. up until 3/4 wound. Although the torque follows the thickness by a cube rule, I’d say you are more likely to be successful by dropping to 0.10 if it very easily starts to bank. You are already getting what is in effect probably more than 360 degrees of amplitude.....
    I would not alter the temper of the spring to deliberately cause it to set as this is not the same as having a set spring which remains at the correct temper. 
  19. Like
    rodabod got a reaction from nickelsilver in New mainspring and Knocking   
    A few bits of advice from my experiences with the same issue:
    Sometimes you can gauge how much the new spring is too strong if you can get it to run in a position where the amplitude drops (eg. crown down). Or perhaps it runs ok on a lower level of wind, eg. up until 3/4 wound. Although the torque follows the thickness by a cube rule, I’d say you are more likely to be successful by dropping to 0.10 if it very easily starts to bank. You are already getting what is in effect probably more than 360 degrees of amplitude.....
    I would not alter the temper of the spring to deliberately cause it to set as this is not the same as having a set spring which remains at the correct temper. 
  20. Like
    rodabod reacted to HectorLooi in Watch cleaning machine on the cheap   
    Just testing my contraption with some random stuff in my clinic. Using plain water only.
    Notice the huge vortex. Some anti-vortex baffles will definitely be necessary.
    Everything comes out magnetized but the good news is that the magnetic stirrer itself can be used to demagnetize the items.
    20200722_100602.mp4
  21. Like
    rodabod reacted to jdrichard in balance wheel wobble   
    So. Would you like me to make a video on how to straighten a Warped or Fouled balance using the proper calipers; etc?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
  22. Like
    rodabod reacted to spectre6000 in balance wheel wobble   
    Jump in the deep end! That's how winners roll! That's also how you break things, but you learn more and more quickly that way. Kudos.
  23. Like
    rodabod reacted to nickelsilver in Pallet jewel depthing?   
    Can't really tell just from the picture, but the entry stone could be a little deep. The lever escapment is complex, and really needs to be approached in a logical step by step manner. If you move that entry stone in, you will reduce the drop lock on the exit side, which may or may not be ok. If you then move that stone out to increase its drop lock (and total lock), you will increase the drop lock on the entry. Or, it won't unlock anymore at all, as the fork hits the banking pin before the escape tooth can come off the impulse surface of the exit stone.
     
    Adjustments to stone depth are often on the order of 0.005mm (5 microns).
    It's good to have a way to measure how far you've moved a stone; Bergeon makes a tool for this of course. I don't like it, I use a measuring microscope, and heat my fork on a brass plate and move the stone with with either an oiler or clean pegwood; oiler to move it out, wedging it behind the stone in the slot and twisting, pegwood to push in, holding the fork with stout nickel (or brass) tweezers. The plate has holes in it to accommodate the arbor. Fork upside down. I use an adjustable heating plate under the brass plate (bergeon), but you can do it with an alcohol lamp like most books show. Mark has a video on it.
    I recommend Jendritski's book Watch Adjustment for a good description of the checking and adjusting procedures.
     
    But to get you started-
    With the balance in, power on the movement
    -stop the balance with a finger (with finger cot), and rotate it slowly until an escape tooth drops off one side of the fork to the other
    -observe the depth of lock at exactly that point. It should be, as a rough rule, about 1/5 the width of the pallet impulse face (just as a length reference). If you move the fork with an oiler toward the balance, the escape tooth should not come off the locking surface. If it does, the stone needs to come out
    -continue turning, the lock should increase, this is the run-to-the-banking, or slide, as the fork continues to the banking. Check the fork horn freedom along this time, this is the fork horn hitting the face of the impulse jewel (the safety action before the guard pin takes over). The total lock now should be roughly 1/3 the width of the pallet face.
    -check that you have freedom between the guard pin here, using an oiler to move the fork from the banking. Continue around the safety roller moving the balance and the fork
    -do this on both sides, entry and exit. If you have good looking drop lock on both, but excessive total lock, move the bankings in to reduce. If you have excessive drop lock, move one or both stones in as needed, keeping in mind moving one has the same effect on the other (for drop lock). If the locks all look good, but you have no or little guard pin clearance on one side, you may have a bent pin. This goes for the fork horns too, but that's rare to have a problem there. If the guard pin looks nice and straight, and the safety roller isn't damaged, it may be that the bankings have been shifted, both, in one direction and the stones moved to adapt, but now the pin is contacting the roller sometimes.
     
    For a quick cheat- and this is really a cheat, meant for folks who know how to otherwise check things-
    - move the balance until the escapement drops. Check the fork safety (fork horn clearance). This is, or at least should be, a little larger than the guard pin clearance, so the maximum "safety action" the escapement will see. You can move the stone in until you are just on the verge of unlocking when checking this clearance. Most of the time this will work, especially on a modern piece, and you will have safe escapement function with the stones in the fork as far as they can safely go.
  24. Like
    rodabod reacted to watchweasol in old oil grade and modern equivalent   
    Hi find attached the Moebius oil information including descriptions and uses.
    horotec Moebius oils book.pdf Moebius Oil and Grease Application Chart - Leosics.co.uk.html
  25. Thanks
    rodabod reacted to nickelsilver in valjoux 7730 cam screw hole to wide   
    You need to punch the hole with a convex punch about twice the hole diameter to close it. But you need to disassemble the watch to support the other side properly with a stump in the staking tool.

    If it's your own watch and you don't mind a bit of a hack job you can slide a piece of hair in the hole. This is utterly unprofessional but might get you enough friction so it's functional.
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