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B3stia

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Posts posted by B3stia


  1. 3 minutes ago, Tmuir said:

    Cousins has it as obsolete, but there is a complete balance with hairspring for a Hamilton 770 on ebay US now as well as a complete movement which is listed as having a good balance

    Thanks Tmuir. I had completely missed the balance on sale. I will ask my watchmaker if it will do.

    I think I want to stay away from used movements as long as possible. 

     


  2. Trust me the spring won't jump. You only have to be careful placing the first coil, all the rest is straightforward. Seiko barrels have their own sizes and you many not find a winder that fits perfectly.

    I didn't face any problems with the spring jumping, it just got too hard winding it around. I'm probably missing something with the technique. I'll see if I can find a video on how to do it.

    The good thing about the k&d winders is that you can adjust the diameter. So the non-standard sizes is not an issue.


  3. I don't know about winders but if you place the spring into the barrel, and go around holding the coils in place with the flat of the tweezers, possibly using finger coats in the right hand, it will go in without much effort.

    I tried winding it in by hand (without having watched any videos on it beforehand I might add). I couldn't do it today. I might give it another go in the future. I would much rather spare my fingers and use the winders though.

    What type of winders are you guys using?


  4. I have that style of winder + a Bergeon style the same as Mark uses. I found that with both of these winders the issue is releasing the arbour once wound. If the spring is a bit tight around the winding arbour then if not careful it will pop the spring out with the flower.

    I found what really helps is to give the winding arbour a thin coating of either barrel grease or Vaseline. Then this really helps when removing.  Also slowly does it I have a very thin pair of tweezers that I use to keep poking the centre of the spring back as it tries to pop out when releasing.

    There's a always that nervous moment when the mainspring is fully in the winder and you have to make sure it doesn't pop out when removing the arbour. But the problems start even before that. I am experiencing the mainspring twisting and turning while winding it. It doesn't wind up in a perfect circle like the others, it moves around between the walls of the arbour and the winder.

    Could it be that the mainspring is not high enough for the winder? That the mainspring doesn't fit tight enough between the arbour and the inside of winder (not talking diameter).


  5. "10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4... take a deep breath and exhale." Ok, I've calmed down, stopped swearing and I promise not to punch and walls.

    Mainspring, my mortal enemy why do you keep taunting me?!

    I feel fairly confident when it comes to disassembling and assembling any type of watch (not including chronos yet). But when I sit staring at that mainspring barrel a voice always whispers in my ear "- Let it be. It's probably fine. No need to disturb what need not be awaken." But I always ignore that voice, I'm a capable man after all, right? Oh the lies, the lies I keep telling myself..

    I have acquired a set of three K&d mainspring winders type 123. They usually do the trick when it has come to old Hamilton movements such as the 980, 770 etc. The t-end mainsprings found in these movements are easy enough to reinstall with said winder (most of the times anyway). Automatics however, seems to be a different beast entirely. I have in the last week completely destroyed two mainsprings while trying to restore a Seiko Sealion. I mean, what's the problem? What is so different with the automatic mainsprings? You hook it up, roll it in, and pop it out in to the barrel. But no no, these mainsprings does not want to play ball. They twist and turn and eventually explode. Is anybody else using similar winders with automatic mainsprings? If so, how do you get it to work? What am I missing? Or should I just leave the mainsprings be? Only open Pandora's box when I know it's broken? What do you suggest?

    Here's the mainspring flower I picked this morning.

    IMG_20160726_132618-01_zpspl71ca8a.jpeg


  6. I was servicing an old Hamilton with the 770 movement. A shock spring managed to disappear under mysterious circumstances and I'm now looking for a replacement part.

    Which shock spring do I need? I found that Ofrei sells different types but I don't know which one to get, if any.

    Here are two photos from my movement. And the third is from the Ofrei website that looks similar.

    Thanks!

    Screenshot_2016-05-29-19-05-36-01_zps6z0yyczf.jpeg

    Screenshot_2016-05-29-19-05-49-01_zpsa6unca7a.jpeg

    Screenshot_2016-05-29-19-06-24-01_zpsf2z0wwui.jpeg


  7. Well I would definitely start with Moebius 9010 (for train wheels and balance endstones) and 9020 (for train wheels) if you are working on Pocket Watches.

    Moebius 9415 is a must for Pallet/Escape wheel teeth.

    A quality silicon grease.

    Moebius D5 is essential (barrel arbor, motion work).

    Molycote DX or Moebius 9501 grease for keyless work.

    Moebius 9501 or 9504 for high friction (e.g. Cannon pinion, Setting lever spring and anything at high friction).

    Moebius 8200 grease for mainspring.

     

    It's a lot but at a minimum get 9010, 9415, D5 and 8200

     

    I hope this helps.

    Hi Mark. I am watching your video on servicing a Venus 175. Would you recommend me using HP 1300 instead of 9501? I also have kt22 that I use on the keyless works whenever I service an old (40-50s) Hamilton wristwatch.

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