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  1. Seiko 7009 Report Hi dear Watchbangers, and welcome back to another little report from me! This week I am keeping in my set deadline and delivering my next project on time haha (not like last week).I know there probably have been a million reports, reviews and video on this but hey, it’s a classic; so this weeks watch is: A Seiko 7009 with a fully lumed up dial! I was super lucky to have found this, since at the time of purchase, I only found the pattern and colour scheme interesting and suddenly, this dial is just glowing up during night! So yeah, as always here’s a link to the commented 4K YouTube video for the lazy readers out there: Lets get into the written report then: Arrival status So this is how the watch arrived after I ordered it on Speedtimerkollektion and it seemed in pretty decent shape. The case was still in a nice condition, the original signed Seiko strap as well and the glass only had a minor little chuff so no need for replacement there. Interestingly enough the watch did not move a second for the first few weeks of me having it but started working again once I was filming for the above-mentioned video. Disassembly 1. Remove the caseback. 2. Remove the Stem by pulling into second position and pressing on the revealed lever to release it. Then remove the case. 3. . Remove the watch hands. They seemed In very good condition with me so no repolishing or reluming. Yay! 4. . Remove the Dial by turning the lever knobs at the dial feet, on the back side, releasing them in the process. The dial texture looks super organic and it makes sense since it is fully lumed! I used a little new makeshift dial container here for the first time to store the dial! 5. Take of the Dial spacer ring. 6. Remove the Front clip folding down the Day wheel by user something thin and sharp ( a cutter knife for example) and follow up by removing the day wheel. This day wheel was in English/ Arabic, which I found really awesome, and it also looks great so Ill be keeping that! 7. Unscrew the day wheel spring. 8. Unscrew the front cover plate and take that off. 9. Remove the top part of the 24 hour wheel by unscrewing the screw holding it all together. 10. Take away the rest of the 24 Hour wheel, the hour wheel, the cannon pinion underneath and the date spring. 11. Then remove the day quick set lever and its spring and the translation wheel from the setting system. 12. Move on to the setting system cover, the yoke and the clutch lever. 13. Remove the cluth and optionally the stem (if its inserted). 14. Lastly unscrew and remove the large metal arch which goes around the movement and hooks against small metal pole. With that, you have completed the disassembly of the front! Turn the movement in the holder so we can work on the back. 15. Remove the rotor and the balance wheel so that no further harm could possibly happen to it. 17. Remove the Pallet fork bridge and the pallet fork (this is ideally in an unwinded state, if there is power, please unwind the mainspring first). 18. Now you can unscrew the winding wheel and the ratchet wheel for the mainspring. 19. Unscrew the main bridge and remove it to reveal the gear train! 20. Remove the small clips holding in the automatic winding mechanism to completely disassemble the main bridge. 21. Remove the Mainspring and its ratchet spring and the complete gear train. 22. Unscrew the secondary small bridge. 23. Remove the final wheel underneath it to fully disassemble the complete watch! Congratulation!! Cleaning Cleaning as always is the hand cleaning method. Let the parts marinate in some naphta and then brush them if necessary. After this treatment I rince the parts of with Isopropanol alcohol to get rid of the previous cleaning fluids and left-over residue. I did however do some searching for vintage cleaners and what not but they really are expensive, around 200 Euros. And while that is a worth while investment, im not really sure if I want to and even can spent that money on something that ill only be using a few times a month at most. Well it’s a dilemma haha. But im also thinking about putting jars with cleaning fluids into ultra-sonic cleaners but I’m not sure if the jar walls are too thick for the ultrasonic waves to be effective. Mainspring Service As usual, I did not have a replacement Mainspring so it came down to servicing the mainspring. Upon opening the barrel, the spring seemed in decent condition, maybe a bit dirty but no visible physical defects. The barrel lid however did show signs of wear, so that place would get some well needed lubrication. Here is is unwinded and the back in its serviced barrel before closing it up. Lubrication Moebius 9010 : All jewels except for the pallet fork jewels Moebius 8200 : Mainspring lubrication Moebius 8217 : Breaking grease for mainspring barrel wall lubrication Moebius HP-1300 : Lubrication for slower turning/moving parts. On the barrel arbour for example. Moebius 9415 : Lubrication for pallet fork jewel teeth Molykote DX: Grease for heavy contact points. Mostly for the front in the setting and winding system for example. Reassembly Just reverse the disassembly Process above. Don’t forget to lubricate the balance and shock jewels and reassemble the main bridge correctly. Timegrapher Test So after cleaning and lubrication, I slapped the watch onto the timegreapher to see if the whole process did anything at all. Here it is preregulated: And post regulation within acceptable parameters. Im very happy about the Amplitude since this amplitude was the highest I have ever gotten in all of my projects! Final Results Concluding Fotoshoot strapped and lumed up again: Conclusion: All in all, restoring this old Seiko 7009 was really fun! Despite me not having the spare and clean replacement parts to replace all parts with visible damages and wear, I still managed to get the watch running in good condition again. Also the very unique and rare dial adds to that and Im happy that the light brushing with th Q-Tip did not damage the Lume on the Dial. Sadly, since the dial is a bit older (70s I would say), the fully charged lume on the dial does not hold its glow for very long and I have no possibility to relume the dial. Either way, Im happy if it even shines a little and yeah! Was a cool little project to work on! So if you guys have any comments, questions, criticism or suggestions/tipps, please write me or put them in the comments! I hope you guys enjoyed reading or the video and stay healthy! Till next time Watch bangers!
    4 points
  2. My watch of today. Another Seiko. This was the first new watch that i bought when i started collecting just under a year ago. Here we have a Seiko 5 Snk809. Generally thought of as a field watch. The case styling is cetainly typical of miltary watches of WW2 even down to the satin finish of the sides and bezel. Possibly an attempt to imitate the wear of a well used SS case. And also with a case size of 37mm keeping within the military specification required of the famous Dirt Dozen watches. The dial does seem similar to that of pilot and fliegar watches with the outer seconds markings and inner hours. If this is a combination of the two then the look does work rather well. It Houses Seiko's now apparently discontinued 7s26 a great workhorse with reasonable accuracy and reliability and has stood the test of time for many years now. Maybe with stocked supplies to last a little while yet, but this model also seems to be discontinued replaced with an updated successor having the extra features of hand winding and hacking. Voted last year's most value for money watch by various youtube collectors in particular The Urban Gentry . I paid £109 for this which i thought was a bargain at the time for a new automatic also with the added nicety of a see through caseback. Still available from Creation watches in America for a lttle less than this. But preowned ones are popping up on Epay in the UK for more money than last years new price. If thinking of treating yourself to one, aim for the J versions of the 7s26, around another tenner more as these are more sought after. All in all a good watch, with great styling at a great price when available. The only down thumbs i have for this watch are the non hacking and non hand winding. But this does apply to all the 7s26 range of movements . That missing point is livable and doesnt change the love i have for this watch.
    3 points
  3. What I use is the self healing cutting mats used by hobbists, they are green ans sodt enough to press tour tweezers inti when picking up springs etc and if you dont like the yellow lines they clean off using white spirit leaving you with a clean green mat with a pleasing colour and almost bounce free at a fairly low cost (depending on size). I have used this for some time its still good and easy to clean. Pictures of the cutting mat various sizes and for the price very good.
    3 points
  4. I had to go dig my Seiko out. I'm moving firewood today so I think it will be the watch of tomorrow.
    2 points
  5. Seiko recommended fully winding the watch, let it run for an hour then regulate with a minimum 20 seconds before taking the measurements in each position, iirc. Tom
    2 points
  6. Just get yourself some green blotting paper cut it to what ever size you want and cover it with glass. to stop it from moving tack some beading around it. That is what I did.
    2 points
  7. I also think that PU as a top layer is good. I tend to recommend the Bergeon mat with 2mm thickness as an alternative. It seems not to be that overpriced as the other items of this brand. The quality is decent and the Bergeon imprint gives you the feeling of being a true professional
    2 points
  8. This book is perfect for beginners and can be found as a pdf in the www:
    2 points
  9. Always best if you show us the timing machine results because we might see something you don't. Especially when things start looking not right. Depending upon the manufacture some like Seiko may give you nothing others will give you settling time measuring time and even maybe in averaging time and sometimes the specify a machine. Then for diagnostic purposes I was like the look at the watch and six positions but typically the factories only look at the watch at a limited quantity of positions. It's not unless you're dealing with the chronometer grade watch will in a factory typically time at six positions. Then I'm attaching a tech sheet which is not for your watch but comes from the OEM division of Seiko. Does a much nicer job of showing things like on page 2 timing specifications. I figured this was a close equivalent to give you a timing specification range between -20 and +40.For timing specifications are only looking at the watch and three positions. Because yes if you really look at the watch and all his possessions to try to figure out timekeeping it becomes really difficult is a lot simpler with less positions but not as good for diagnostic purposes. Then on page 14 the talk about the regulating system how to adjust it. Oh and the reason they don't give super detailed specifications in every single tech sheet is they assume you actually know how to service a watch. Tech sheets were not necessarily written assuming that a newbie would be working on their watches they assume that your watchmaker which is why they're not written in the best of fashion. They don't even cover everything is longtime stuff is covered in other documents this is quite common with the Swiss tech sheets that we separate lubrication guides for instance separate guides for all kinds of things Omega has actually an entirely separate guide for just regulating their watches so as not even mentioned in the service guides. In real life are lucky to get anything technical at all from the company's. NH36_TG.pdf
    1 point
  10. Hi everyone, Well it's been a while but I managed to find a new old stock balance complete. I fitted this about a month ago and the watch has been running brilliantly ever since. I am really really pleased with it. Just thought I'd bring you all up to speed and close this thread, thanks for all your help everyone. Gra
    1 point
  11. The adjusting components are all separate their stacked together which means they can all move independent of each other except they're not free-floating stacked together there's pressure holding them all together. So usually if you move one the other one can move. The Seiko tech sheet I'm looking at it doesn't show them broken down a separate components so I had to get one off another tech sheet to show you.. Isn't this watch using a Etachron system and if so you shouldn't be bending the hairspring. But you should be using the proper procedure to make sure they hairspring is centered etc. unless a course somebody spent the hairspring or you bandits then yes you could be having a problem for that all things that you're supposed to checking for when you regulating.
    1 point
  12. Hard knocks in the figurative sense, in as much as below. Its hopefully not going to live the life a lot of the Timex brand did in the early days, Being a mans working watch.
    1 point
  13. Nice watch, definitely in the general style of the flieger-B. I do like military watches. Probably’cos I’m an ex-squadie Tom
    1 point
  14. That is why I had beading around it all so nothing could roll off.
    1 point
  15. Hi After dismantling and cleaning etc any watch it is advisable to let it run for a while so it can "bed" in and give the lubrication time to get moving, after 24hrs or so then put it in the Tg and check the results.
    1 point
  16. I have silicone for electronics only. See my post above for my material and dimensions
    1 point
  17. My Timex Waterbury 2018 backlight was intermittent from new. This was a 60th birthday present which I really appreciated so I didn't want to try and return it in the heat of the Pandemic. After about a month the Idiglo stopped working altogether even though the watch keeps excellent time. The illumination itself was working fine when it worked at all. The problem was that pushing the watch crown inwards to activate the light seemed at fault. Towards the end I found I had to pull the crown out slightly and then press to get the light to come on. This ran the risk of accidentally changing the position of the hands which meant I couldn't trust the time afterwards. It was getting annoying! Following advice in the forums I used a stout bladed knife and popped the back off by lifting the tabbed part against the nearest lug. Replacing the back was going to be very tough but more on that later. The scratches on the crystal look terrible in this picture but it's hardly noticeable in reality. The fault did appear to be with the on/off switch mechanism so that's what I went looking for. When you press on the crown the sprung lever should be pressed against the gold plated electrical contact and complete the circuit for the light. The spring then returns the crown, the circuit is broken and the light goes off again. Ok so cool. I know how it is supposed to work now but it's so simple, how can it not be working? To make matters worse it did work absolutely perfectly with the back off! So I figured that I had mended it and put the back cover back on. This was VERY HARD. I couldn't press the thing hard enough to make it snap back and all that happened was that the cover 'see-sawed' around and I started to worry that I would damage it. So in the end I pushed the cover as far into position as I could and then clamped it between two pieces of wood in a table vice. Protecting it with layers of paper towel I gradually increased the pressure - fully expecting to crush the crystal - until it popped back on. I'd been very careful to clean the surfaces around the seal and replace the rubber gasket without any twists that might compromise the water resistance. But the backlight was still faulty. Exactly the same. I guess the stem was touching the lever while the back and retaining parts were removed. I took the back off again and decided to go a bit further this time. The stem was removed very easily by pressing the little locking tab. I don't have a picture of it happening but when I was handling the case to get the stem out a tiny, tiny circlip fell out as well. About 1.75mm diameter. I'd never seen one of these things so small! Here's a picture of it close to the groove it should be clipped into. I know that holding it with a magnetic pick could risk magnetising it but I tried tweezers and immediately realised that the tiny thing would go flying into orbit and be lost forever. How am I supposed to get the circlip into the groove without it disappearing across the room? The answer was Blu-Tack. I pressed the circlip into it with the open part upwards and then pressed the watch stem down on to it until it clicked in. Result!! And that was it. I replaced the stem and did the scary vice thing again to replace the back and it was done. Good result! Considering how many Indiglos have been sold around the world I was surprised that there was just nothing like this on the internet so I'm posting to help others in the future. It was pretty easy to do once I knew what was needed. But it was also VERY fiddly and you really should be aware that losing the circlip or crushing a watch in a vice are likely to void your warranty! See you out there, Moo
    1 point
  18. I watched an old time watchrepairer on an old 15 minute film called the watch repairer ( catchy title for a film). He used tweezers to fit hands. In fact he used a pair of steel tweezers for just about everything.
    1 point
  19. And further down the rabbit hole we go -_- Oh well i got appropriate stones and a guide for the screwdrivers.
    1 point
  20. You are best to remove whatever calendar works you have to be on the safe side. Cutting corners to save on time can and often results in accidental damage. It is your watch its really your call matey.
    1 point
  21. Thanks for bringing this movement back into the forefront of my mind. I have about a thousand (if I'm exaggerating, it's not by much) of the FHF 60s, 120s, as well as other similarly sized and proportioned movements. I think I will try and go through a few more of them. Like the proverbial old guy giving away candy to the children, I have given watches to friendly women I interact with throughout my travels. I've already given several away to customers at work or to the cashiers at the grocery store. I do get some interesting looks. Just try to visualize the whole thing without the creep factor. Have a great day. Shane
    1 point
  22. @PlatoI know what you mean but the flip side of that is to know your budget constraints and limit your watch projects to stay within budget. That means knowing when to bail on something that's going to take you down a rabbit hole. I understand that everything within a mechanical watch can be fabricated from scratch given the materials and proper tools. I don't need to be able to turn a balance staff or to cut my own wheels or pinions. I'm not trying to become a "watchmaker" - I'm only trying to understand watch mechanics and amuse myself. I don't see myself as ever re-jeweling a plate or adjusting end shake but I want to understand when that is required and what I'd have to do in that situation. I'm never going to have the opportunity to work on a Patek Philippe or a Breguet and that's OK. If I eventually acquire the skill to clean and lube my Zenith (and feel confident that I can do so without screwing up my own watch) I'll be happy.
    1 point
  23. I start will soft steel. I then, starting from upper pivot using a slide rest (or cross slide depending on your terminology): -cut the length for the upper pivot, leaving it 0.02 under the next diameter to cut (this sets the length, the extra material on diameter is good during heat treatment) -cut the next diameter, to size, collet diameter, to size, balance diameter, to size -cut the rest of the length to the hub diameter with another tool, essentially a parting tool: -cut roller diameter, leaving it 0.02 oversize of its largest diameter -cut next diameter (if there is one), to size, or- -cut pivot diameter to 0.02 under the last one cut, then part off to length Harden and temper. Holding on the roller diameter or hub, with hand gravers: -form conical pivot, leave 0.01 or 0.02 oversize -cut rivet, make chamfers, polish up with 1200 grit paste on pegwood Flip, holding on balance diameter: -form pivot -cut taper for roller -cut hub taper -polish up as/if needed Rivet to balance, burnish pivots to size in Jacot, round pivots in lathe. It's extremely rare for one to distort in hardening. If it's a really long staff for a really high end watch it's just a little more time to do the first steps leaving a tiny bit of extra material then finishing between centers after heat treatment, but haven't resorted to that in many years
    1 point
  24. 4 screws (3x A type and 1x B type). First we will unscrew one B type screw, part number 0016 705. It is a phillips head screw. (Another unorthodox component!). To be able to remove this screw, we would have to make a tool - a "half phillips head screwdriver". :-) Place a sheet of medium coarse (400 or 600 grade) sand paper on to a flat surface and shape the blade of your smallest size screwdriver (40 or 60 / 0.40 or 0.60mm) as per photo. Hi there hope this helps. Hopefully you will get enough traction to remove the screw.....
    1 point
  25. It's difficult being a moderator on a forum like this dealing with everyone from the professional, through the hobbyist down to the complete amateur who's broken their watch and wants one-off advice or sometimes, frankly, is too lazy to spend more than the 30 seconds it takes to use google to find their answer so just pops it on our forum. I'd like to say a personal thanks to @oldhippy for his hard work and good advice and certainly we don't want you stepping down as a moderator! Some of the changes suggested here, such as a waiting period for new members is a good idea. Heck ... there could even be a nominal joining fee. A few dollars for good advice is nothing for someone who is serious about repairing a watch (even as a one off topic on a treasured watch) or wants to turn their current interest into a hobby or more. This would also not only help with the upkeep of the site but dissuade chunks of that chaff. Just an idea.
    1 point
  26. Very true. And I do feel very uncomfortable forcing people to introduce themselves before interacting in other areas. But I am willing to listen - this is a membership site and we all have a stake in it's success. The reason why I have never forced introductions in the past is because people should have choice - new members have a choice to introduce themselves as well as existing members have a choice to simply ignore their questions. I must say - I am a little disappointed that this is an issue as the original intent of this forum was to be a help towards others with less knowledge as well as a community where all levels of horologists and enthusiasts could come together and simply be - and be relaxed. With that in mind - I have a solution, and it is a very very simple one. .... 1. I am not going to enforce an introduction policy, but I will make it more clear that members of this site will consider it polite if people do so first. ( I will work on making this prominent in the welcome email and I will make this clear with a information box at the top of the forum which only new members will be able to see). 2. If a new member posts a question without introducing themselves then, and here's the simple part, existing members who may be offended by this do not have to participate in that thread. We even have an ignore function on this forum if you feel that strongly about it. 3. Any member, both new or old who harasses new members, and it's reported to me, will be warned - persistent harassment's will result in a ban. A Word Of Encouragement... One-hitters who don't even reply sometimes are extremely annoying. Especially if you have crafted a three paragraph response with pictures and the OP does not even acknowledge your reply. It sucks. BUT - remember this. This is a public forum which gets indexed by search engines. Your replies are never a waste of time - it's all good content which will be read many hundreds or thousands of time - there is no telling how many people you will have eventually helped - with this in mind, it does not even matter who starts the conversation, your replies and the passing on of knowledge will stay on this site for people to find for years to come. It's not a waste of time.
    1 point
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