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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/11/22 in all areas

  1. So the other week I bought a second hand stereo Microscope from facebook market and found out it didn't have the 48mm thread required to fit a barlow lens to it. I'm a little bugger I didn't want to miss-out on this I thought long and hard about how I was going to fix this. at first I thought about just gluing the barlow the the microscope lets face it I only paid £25.00 so what was the harm of doing this, but them I realized what would happen if I needed a different barlow lens so thinking hard and looking at youtube some bloke hacked a led light adapter by placing it in a drill and while spinning the adapter grinding the inner part to fit his object lens. this looked really terrible and his thread was the wrong way around (male) so he also had to buy a another adapter too add a female thread to his microscope. so thinking about this I came up with the idea to just glue a camera filter to the underside of the object lens SORTED works a treat and I now have a fixed 48 mm thread to my object lens happy chap and it only cost me £2.00 for a filter of the bay. If anyone needs a filter to convert there stereo microscope like mine I have a spare skylight filter you can have I bought a spare one just incase I glued it in place by placing it under my lens and then move the scope down until it trapped the filter and barlow lens while the glue went off (I left it over night) I placed glue all the way around the inside of the filter
    3 points
  2. Moving the adjuster arm without affecting the beat error is impossible imho. So the timegrapher might have a problem. I would check the beat symmetry visually and with the help of a slo-mo.
    3 points
  3. The winder number you need depends on the barrel you're working with. For example, if you're working with a 7xxx Seiko movement, then you need a #6 winder with a left handed arbor, for a 61xx/63xx movement you'll need a #7 winder with a (#7 or #6) right handed arbor. I'm using the winder without a handle. I wish I had one, but it is not a must. About the grease, as always there are many techniques, some use a pice of watchmaker paper to spread a film of grease along the spring and some install the spring dry and then put four dots of grease on top of it. I personally put four dots of breaking grease on the barrel wall and then install the spring with the film of grease on it.
    3 points
  4. In parallel with fiddling with actual old watch movements, I've been working through Mark's online watch repair course. To date I've worked through 21 lessons covering 97 topics. Although I "technically" passed my Level 3 course with a 76% score on the assessment (where the average is only a 78%) I didn't do well enough to receive a certificate as I did with Levels 1 and 2. Luckily there's no time limit on access to the courseware so I plan to work through the 5 movements I have on hand and re-do the Level 3 FAULT FINDING course again. Truth be told, I knew once I got started that fault finding was going to be more difficult than either Level 1 or 2 and I was actually surprised that I got 76% on the assessment. I was also encouraged that the average grade was only a 78% which means that while I didn't do great - nobody else did either. So, I guess the "achievement" here is that I'm only just beginning this journey and (possibly) that you can teach an old dog new tricks?
    2 points
  5. I no nothing about cars and I don't buy flat backed furniture.
    2 points
  6. I don't know how long you have been working on Mark's courses. When I started my apprenticeship back in the early 70's it took me 5 years of learning then another 2 what they called improving so 7 years and even now being on this wonderful interesting forum I'm still learning I read something new nearly every day. grsnovi, you will never learn everything there is to know in horology. Keep at it just improving your skills will make you a better watchmaker.
    2 points
  7. Hi @Polco, I also just completed Level 3 but I'll have to do it again to get my certificate as my final score wasn't great. I have about 5 movements here to work on and I suspect I'll go back through the course and do fine. Welcome to the forum!
    1 point
  8. Might work like shown here (2:00 up) https://youtu.be/3KoZ-VXDcSI
    1 point
  9. 1 point
  10. Thank you for your introduction and welcome to this friendly forum. We all look forward to your contributions and continued involvement.
    1 point
  11. Hi Polco. Just joined myself. Your story is identical to mine! Very much a learner. Cheers
    1 point
  12. I love smith's watches. The deluxe, astral, imperial, national 15 and 17. Not so much the empires, they are sort of attractively rough and ready inside, bit like me lol. I was given an astral last week. I dont know what to do yet,ive barely touched anything for a month now as i wanted a good break from them. But i have about thirty wristwatches to have a crack at. A lot of Oris. I do need to revisit a smiths diver i have, that needs a new crystal and a slightly damaged bezel that i just cant find a replacement for anywhere, and also a very poorly oris pointer that needs a hair (spring ) transplant and new dial feet that ive been trying to learn to repair, and a couple of other minor issues. A quartz zenith port royal to reattach a new quartz oscillator to. A lathe to strip down and service, so i can start learning to repivot. Haha. Thats just for starters, its a good job I'm semi retired. Big kitchen refurb to start next week though so I'll be busy with that for a few weeks. Couldn't turn it down as the profit was too good to miss out on.
    1 point
  13. one of the problems we have on this discussion group is people using apps with microphones for audio processing but not designed for picking up watch sounds which are not actually sounds at all. Yes we can hear them as sounds with the timing machine picks up the vibration not the sound. The simplistic of all of this is on multiple occasions we've been led astray because the apps are barely adequate. Which becomes frustrating if we can't help somebody who relies on an app when a timing machine is a relatively inexpensive thing that's actually quite necessary. why would the screws slip? The screw holding the study and should be relatively tight if it slipped thing where you taking it out or doing something with it? than paying the balance wheel the bridge like that isn't really recommended as you can distort the hairspring. As nice as the pictures are of the balance wheel and the bottom side of the balance bridge why don't you give us a view of the balance wheel in the watch. It almost looks like from your pictures of the movement is still in the case? It be really nice to get a sideways view of the balance in the watch which you can't do if it's in the case. That also a view looking straight down on the hairspring once again with the balance and bridge in the watch. Because the ultimate problem is in the watch not out of the watch it's hard to see when it's out of the watch because it's usually better if we can see it in the watch the coding system won't let me quote what I want to quote sledges snipping out an image. The text that somebody wrote is correct for a whole variety of reasons. The text in the photograph is not right at all. If you listen the stud screw all you can do is have the stud go up and down. If you want to push really hard on the hairspring you will destroy it. You will note that they hairspring is held in with a pin in order to shove it it have to pull the pin out. If you pull the pin out and shove the hairspring is not totally screw up regulation and you might as well get a balance completes. This is where we come back to balance wheel goes in the watch and you probably have to make the correction of bending the hairspring there although ideally be nice if you practice on some scrap hairsprings first and we really need to see what it looks like in the watch.
    1 point
  14. 1 point
  15. That might be that therory out of the window then. Haha. But I'm thinking that OH you have good taste in furniture and that you prefer to ride a pushbike .lol Mostly yes i totally agree with that. Unless your name is Godfrey as mine is. You can call me God for short . Yes G absolutely not possibly you can. We should be realistic to a point to avoid disappointment. But never underestimate what you can do.
    1 point
  16. A subject doesn't exist were someone knows everything. They is always something to learn on any topic.
    1 point
  17. The whole piece is different. Breguet regulator pins have less distance from center than flat hairspring ones (unless you have a very very rare "100" curve). Frank
    1 point
  18. No reason to adjust the hairspring length to adjust for beat, move the beat adjustor arm. Was beat error less before you moved things? Beat adjustor arm spans up to 90 degrees, do you get the same beat error at any point of it. I'd clean the balance & cock assembly and put it back on the mainplate, to check the coil, it might be fouling itself or sticking it should be flat and level.
    1 point
  19. Practice makes perfect. I usually tell folks if you have problems assembling flatpack (IKEA) furniture then don't bother with watches. If you can dismantle/service/assemble stuff like car carburetors/brakes/engines then you're good to go. Anilv
    1 point
  20. All brake greases have a content of dry lubricant such as graphite, MoS2 or PTFE. The 8201 is a grease with MoS2. The wholesaler Flume says: „For switch springs, levers, pins, automatic main springs.“
    1 point
  21. I see in the video he uses 8201 as a breaking grease, not the first time I have seen this on YouTube videos. 8201 is not listed as a breaking grease. Anyone got any thoughts on this
    1 point
  22. Definitely. I have a friend who regularly makes overcoils, he uses the simple method where he grabs it in strong tweezers and pushes into wood to make the overcoil bends, and shapes by hand (to a diagram). He's passed several pieces through COSC that he's done.
    1 point
  23. The arm you show in 2nd pic is beat adjustor, if beat error stays the same dispite moving this arm, then your tg might not have shown the facts. Test your tg with another watch ( accurate watch ) How do you clean the balance & cock assembly?
    1 point
  24. @Tiny Maybe the next one you work on will need the 6...
    1 point
  25. Second Nucejoe. Had several movements including Seiko in that the beat adjuster arm moved with the regulator arm and often stayed off beat when the regulator was moved back. May need to hold beat adjuster arm whilst you move regulator arm. I would put the regulator at mid point and hold in place whilst adjusting the beat error, then re-adjust the regulator if required.
    1 point
  26. When and where will the sale be. I could spend days looking at all that lot. Just looking at those few photos this is the star of the show. It's a French alarm in a nice case you don't see them in that type of case they are normally just in a round drum case that is why they are known as a French drum clock.
    1 point
  27. You might have moved the beat adjustor arm.
    1 point
  28. I haven't seen a balance complete that was intended to have the overcoil formed by the watchmaker, but it could exist. One thing to check- pretty much all Breguet springs have a collet with the hole for the spring significantly lower than a normal collet (normal would be hole right in the middle of the collet height). If your spring is in the middle, it was to be a flat spring.
    1 point
  29. I was going to tell a suppository joke, but I figured the moderators would never pass it.
    1 point
  30. This video might be helpful: https://youtu.be/kYIdKtSHr2g
    1 point
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