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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/03/21 in all areas

  1. In this months BHI (May 2021) mag there is an excellent article covering watch mainspring winders. The winders reviewed/ tested were Bergeron, Rolex, Chinese, Marshall,Kendrick & Davis (‘K&D’). The conclusions made replicate what I have said many times. One set does not cover all requirements with regard to barrel and arbour sizes. The Bergeron winders are supplied in either caliber specific (ETA) or by barrel size. The problem with this to cover all options 31 barrel bodies and cranks(arbors) have to be purchased. Not only is this above most horologist budgets the arbours are of
    4 points
  2. I designed and printed this. It has a bearing embedded in it with a small clearance to create a nice rotation feel. The PLA I used prints beautifully and allows you to sand it a little which creates a tactile smooth finish.
    3 points
  3. the absolute best would be to replace it. Then depending upon how bad it is you just want to burnish the material if you do anything to change the shape that's going to really screw things up. the problem of having too many books is to remember which one I saw something in? The problem may have with burnishing or doing anything is there's a guard pin in the way. So whatever you use if it goes through has to be super thin. Somewhere saw a picture of where they used a mainspring and they must've lightly filed to make it like a burnished or so it is little bit a texture. But then they held i
    2 points
  4. I have been given this watch recently, it's of no value at all really, but I decided that I would get it working again, if I could. Balance staff was in 2 pieces, lower jewel was smashed and the movement was totally gummed up. Good old Ebay got me a staff £8.00 and after a lot of searching through my box of jewels I actually found one that was close, so after opening up the setting with a brooch and pushing the new jewel in place we were a step closer. Unfortunately I'd run out of cleaning fluid, my own fault, so believe it or not I had to get out the Pegwood and clean it the
    2 points
  5. The safety pin only comes into action when there is a shock, as you pointed out. I think where contact is made on the safety pin during a shock would depend on how the entire balance wheel moved during a shock, although it would be somewhere near the tip of the pin.
    1 point
  6. unfortunately your answered your own question. The slot has to be nice and smooth without notches for the roller jewel to catch in. The size or the width is critical otherwise you'll have to change the roller jewel to match. The angle the horn is critical. I give you were to shorten the ends that would change things. Simplistically everything involved with the escapement is critical that it be right for maximum performance. Sometimes you get by with a little bit so maybe it might be better not to make the fork perfect if you can't get it taken care of just see how it does rather than trying to
    1 point
  7. There are some mini degussit stones available which might be just what you need.
    1 point
  8. Quite sure these hands are (nickel-)plated. A bit polishing will not remove the plating. You need pure unplated steel (not stainless steel) or iron for blueing. If cheap or not doesn't matter. Frank
    1 point
  9. I don’t think your flame source is hot enough to get the heat through all those shavings. You said the shavings are turning the colors you want though. the spectrum of tempering colors are caused by a heat range and your shavings are getting hot enough but are absorbing too much heat. The shavings are there to help even out the temp and make the hands oxidize in a slower more controllable manner. They aren’t even necessary if you have a thick plate but it look sad if you are using an ashtray. remove half your shavings and try again. if it’s not going passed yellow still, remove
    1 point
  10. A hydraulic lifter would certainly work, but lets not miss the point, if tweezers wont lift the hour wheel then something is binding which will eventually affect the amplitude.
    1 point
  11. Oh ok. I was wondering if the bergeon style presto hand removal tool would have worked seeing as there’s a slight edge just below the tube which would allow the jaws of the presto tool to grip.
    1 point
  12. Does he think he is greasing a bloody car engine, talk about over the top if he goes about it like that with all his clock mainsprings he must use pots of the stuff. Disregard what he has done. The bronze line isn’t correct. When the fusse was invented cat gut or a chain would be used, but you cannot use a fusse chain on a fusse that has been made to take a line, the groves are a different cut. Cat gut would have been used as the line. The nearest you can get today is the synthetic gut. He contradicts himself by saying about how you should go about preserving the originality of the clock
    1 point
  13. When cleanliness is paramount, any handling tools (tweezers etc) also need to scrupulously clean to avoid cross contamination.
    1 point
  14. You're showing two different hands there, is the yellow one blue on the bottom? Some stainless steel will get a little yellow but not blue. If the hand is plated then it shouldn't change much or at all. But you say you polished it, so any plating should be gone. As others have said, cleanliness is the most important thing. I frequently blue hands, I've found that clean benzine works best for me but 99% isopropyl alcohol is good too. A final step I do is lay the hand on clean paper, then give it a stroke across with freshly cut pithwood dipped in clean benzine (or alcohol), then puf
    1 point
  15. Blotching is a sign of grease which clockboy has said. I always preferred an old English penny to brass shavings. It takes a few practises to get it right. When blued quench the hand in oil it gives a nice shine. That is how I would blue clock screws, getting them all the same colour takes practise.
    1 point
  16. Interesting article for those who are confused about watch mainspring winders and which to buy. Thanks clockboy.
    1 point
  17. It can be repaired providing the movement inside is identified. This is required to see if parts are available.
    1 point
  18. Successful Blueing hands requires that they are spotlessly clean and absolutely free of grease. Looking at your results that is the issue.using brass shavings is good and has given me the best results.
    1 point
  19. Seiko does not sell the mainspring alone, only the barrel complete. On the 6R15 the mainspring made of a special steel (SPRON) and even if the barrel complete is found, price may be quite high. On the other hand a generic mainspring likely will not provide the specifications of 50hrs power reserve. That being said I don't know how you have diagnosed that something is wrong with the mainspring, which is not common at all.
    1 point
  20. Hello and welcome to the forum, In the Uk Cousins UK watch parts, A.G Thomas. Gleave and co H.S.Walsh all material houses In the YSA Jules Borel. Esslingers Time savers to name but a few. BTW It is considered polite to give an introduction when joining the forum. cheers.
    1 point
  21. Sounds like you have a loose cannon pinion. When you pull the winding crown out to adjust the time, do you feel the usual amount of resistance or does it feel very loose?
    1 point
  22. Who knew...that this forum was so full of philosophers. I love this place!! Great responses...and inspirational. Thanks for the great responses. Time will tell....
    1 point
  23. IMG_9719.MOV I'm a bit reluctant to share this, because it will probably jinx me again, but i cleaned off that grease i applied to the fork and escape wheel and by golly, it's running again. so it seems like it was operator error ? Thanks for everyone's input on this. Boy, when it works it's fun, but when it doesn't .... I just need to find a bow and clean up the case/crystal and bit. I hope everyone has a great weekend.
    1 point
  24. My personal fascination is more along this bent. I took an online course on special relativity while recovering from an especially bad car wreck a few years back, and gained an entirely new perspective on time. It's a difficult lens to translate, but time pieces are incredible. I've mentioned elsewhere my buddy's work on the new experimental resonator for the atomic clock. It's so accurate, you can measure the difference in elevation within earth's gravity well within a cm... I am also a fan of history, and my first mechanical watch accidentally turned out to be a WWII German issued offi
    1 point
  25. My interest in watches was sparked when I bought a birth year (and month) watch off ebay only to find it didn't work. I rang a few watch repairers and they quoted me about £300. No way was I spending £300, the robbing ********. So, one year later and £4,000 worth of tools I finally fixed my watch. Who's laughing now eh?
    1 point
  26. Whatever the reason, I am happy to see the renewed interest in mechanical timepieces, in hopes that I will have more to work on, and more to save from the scrap heap. So, I'm hoping this trend will continue for a little while longer. I can be a hopeless romantic about mechanical watches. It's fascinating how they needed no battery to fuel them back in the day; just a few second's input of the energy produced by thumb and finger, stored in the spring, could power them for many hours. I always thought that was quite a return. And they seem, in essence, like little "tape measures for the in
    1 point
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