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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/20/21 in all areas

  1. A true optimist is the guy who falls off a skyscraper and after 50 floors thinks to himself – well, so far so good!
    2 points
  2. Masala chai originates from India. You can try getting it from South Asian grocers. You can sometimes get a ground spice blend which you can add to and Indian teas. Or if you are willing to experiment, it's usually a blend of cardamom, cinnamon and cloves. Sometimes ginger and black pepper corns are added too.
    2 points
  3. Hi there , sanding down the lume would make marks that may not be visible to the naked eye but would be clearly visible under magnification .Why not strive for perfection and redo the lume,after all this is what watchmaking is all about and practice makes perfect ,then you will learn the properties of applying lume.Not only that but you risk damaging other parts of the dial .If at first you don't succeed, then try again as the saying goes.Take your time and strive for perfection.After all your are doing a restoration . hope this helps ,Graziano Oh and I forgot to mention sanding the
    1 point
  4. Not to split hairs but I don't think there is any advantage in using engine oil on machinery. No damage will occur but is not made for that. Without going to lengths, engine oil must work and maintain its properties under high temperatures, pressures, and exposition to contaminants, plus it must deliver a bunch of other features. Nothing or very little of that exists in a machine tool. And if it's of synthetic formulation its characteristics (mainly, extended service life) do not have a chance of being triggered. So you will find that machine oil, from a sewing machine to a plain b
    1 point
  5. I took a look at the mechanism today, and naturally the coil was open circuit. This might have proved an insurmountable issue as I was unlikely to be able to source a new coil. Since a google search of "wtl-m2-50-230-600" produced nothing I figured it was worth stripping down the existing one and taking a look for the source of the problem. It turned out to be a dry solder joint, which was pretty simple to remedy. If you look closely you will see that the coil consists of three thin conductors (wires) rather than a single larger diameter conductor. Th
    1 point
  6. Hello and welcome to the forum. The Timex was another link in the evoloution of watch making and the fact they still survive today is testament to the engineering. revolutionary at the time. Not every one likes them but on this forum we respect others opinions which they are entitled to have.
    1 point
  7. Hello Michael , I deal with Labanda on a weekly basis , and I often pop in and see Geoff who is the owner . If you want to know any information on what he sells ,he is very helpful .Just give Labanda a call and ask to speak to Geoff ,very nice fellow trust me. Hope this helps Graziano
    1 point
  8. Hi VWatchie you have 3 blades to chose from, you place the blade into the snap back slot provided and push the main body into the Watch and pop goes the weasel, I mean caseback. You can also adjust the strength of the pressure applied by turning the top of body clockwise or anti clockwise. I have mine on the weakest setting as they have a lot of power on the strongest setting and I have damaged a case. But they are very good at what they are deigned for. They have a strong spring inside the main body and when pressed against the surface it goes to a certain point then bingo. Hope this he
    1 point
  9. Update... What a marvelous little tool. I was shocked by the "Shock Tool." The very first attempt literally blasted the caseback off and across my bench. I had been soaking the watch in an 1/8" pool of CLP while waiting for the arrival of the $120 or so tool from Cousins. As you can see, there is a layer of it on everything in the case. Sucker was rusted tight. It'll never be a waterproof watch again, but there is no damage beyond where the case and its back met. Happy camper. I can certainly recommend it to you, jdm. Cheers.
    1 point
  10. While newer movements are marked under the balance, older ones are marked under the dial or not at all. The method I use for unknown or unmarked movements is by their finger prints, or the shape of the set lever bridge, set lever and detent. These can be matched to a specific maker and model number. If that fails, then likely it was made before parts were standardized. I'm certain this is not an American make.
    1 point
  11. Speaking of tea, this must be the Patek of tea's Da-Hong Pao Tea At $1.2 million per kilogram, Da-Hong Pao Tea is the most expensive in the world. This variety has been declared a national treasure by the Chinese government and dates back to the Ming Dynasty. The process used during harvesting remains a closely guarded secret.Have YOU had some? Whoa!
    1 point
  12. Well the Dumbarton Westclox arrived recently, and spent a couple of days in Covid quarantine, so today I had a quick crack at addressing its more obvious cosmetic issues. The bezel, it turns out, was, at some stage in the dim and distant past, polished brass. The ebay pictures had me thinking it was probably nickel plated, but that was just the result of many many years of neglect. I didn't even check the coil, I'll take a look at that, and servicing the mechanism next. The process for removing the bezel and glass in order to remove the filth on the inside, was less than obvi
    1 point
  13. Agreed as to the company and surroundings. Ive been to Kenya a few times for work and they drink "mixed tea" which is apparently made with 50/50 water/milk. It is at least twice as strong as "regular" black tea if brewed with just water. Aderdare was a popular brand. The milk was local whole milk, grass-fed and very sweet naturally. Usually added a bit of turbinado sugar. I make it at home like that every once in awhile and it is close, but not the same as having it made for you in Kenya.
    1 point
  14. You have let the cat out of the bag? You can tell him what I used to with them if you like. ?
    1 point
  15. Equally as important to occasionally cleaning it is to remember to put oil in the bearings. It's amazing how many people don't realize that and run the lathe with the bearings dry which is definitely not what you want to do. 's amazing if there lubricated the last almost forever. Conceivably they will last forever we just don't have enough time to verify that in our lives.
    1 point
  16. Hi There are many things that can stop a watch even a quartz one, congealed oil, dirty oil, dirt, coil u/s circuit block u/s. you need to verify that the watch is pulsing and the coil is good, but to do this you need tools. and as the replacement movement cost is around the £15 mark from cousins uk watch parts, It is probably cheaper and quicker to change the movement complete. attached id the tech sheet for the VD53a and B 3546_Seiko VD53A, VD53B (3).pdf
    1 point
  17. On behalf of anyone else with a third world internet connection, if you post it to YouTube, then share a link, those of us without bandwidth can view it as well (it's also really easy to post videos that way).
    1 point
  18. Glad to be of assistance. The original watch was given to me by a friend who bought it new, so dial/bezel are indeed original, as is the rest apart from the new parts described.
    1 point
  19. The larger brass rings at either end are friction fitted and pop off. These are the covers for the oiling point, you should oil it every use. At the drawbar end is the knurled nut you mention, remove that (it's a "spring" fit so normal to feel tight- but some might have a set screw- check). There's a set screw in the pulley, remove that. This is a plain bearing machine, no ball bearings . You need to push the spindle out, usually you will need to tap it with a brass drift. When it's all apart you'll have the spindle, the rear male bearing that fits on the spindle, and the pulley.
    1 point
  20. Funnily enough, that's the video I made. It should be pretty much like it is in the vid
    1 point
  21. Hi there jdrichard, thank you, I would use some uhu 2 pack glue and mix it up with some lume of your choice, make sure you mix a good portion of the lume in the glue as much as you can get in the mixture and use an oiler to place it in that pip holder. You can dome it or fill it flat. Make sure you don't touch it with anything for a couple of days. It will dry looking like a lumed glass pip. It will stay there as it will be glue and lumed at the same time. I think it would look cool with bgw9 to add a bit of colour in the dark. The choice is yours my friend Regards Graziano
    1 point
  22. True Noirrac1J, Also we have to acknowledge that Oris, which was one of the main proponents of the pin-lever (some even chronometer grade!), was one of the main forces behind the resurgence of the mechanical watch in the late 80s. Also without Sicura (another pin-lever brand), we may not have Breitling with us now. Anilv
    1 point
  23. Wether watch repair is your hobby, or you wish to train as a watch repairer, you will need to buy some tools at some stage. These are the 10 most useful tools you will need in your kit.There is the right tool for every job in all trades and this is especially true for watch repairing. No matter how many tools you have, there always seems to be something needed. I know many watch repairers, some with many, many years behind their belts, who truly enjoy sifting through a catalog of tools in order to see what would make their lives easier. Indeed, I have almost 25 years in the trade, and I have
    1 point
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