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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/01/20 in all areas

  1. My advice: leave it alone unless there is a compelling reason to remove it. Older Rolex (15xx) works this way too, and those parts, though easy to find, command silly prices. So, I suggest ultrasonic cleaning (even though mine is busted), then careful oiling with the finest oiler as required. A "compelling reason" to remove it might be a broken jewel/worn bushing for instance. And re-installing it correctly without a jeweling kit probably wouldn't go perfectly. I understand you can't always ascertain that without full disassembly, but sometimes you have to punt.
    2 points
  2. the tool found way up at the top of the page looks like I have two of them. One here at the bench at home and one at the bench at work. then the other tool is only at work I feel deprived here that I don't have one at home also. Then the real question becomes which one do I grab when I have to take one of those wheels off? It's always nice to have options because a lot of times one tool just isn't going to cut it. But I'm guessing I usually grab the one that I gave an image for then if that doesn't work I use the other tool. On the other hand maybe I just use whichever when I grab first.
    2 points
  3. Welcome to the forum. Yes, this comes out the front. The two large casing screws need to be removed, and then the crystal and bezel for it come off. A sharp, clear photo of the side of the case, should confirm the bezel is a separate piece. The press might be used to reinstall it- not a concern at the moment. It appears the small screw, adjacent to where the stem enters, is the stem release. Loosen, but don't remove, that screw, and the stem should pull out. Then the movement can be removed from the front. You may want to remove the hands before you take the movement out, to pro
    2 points
  4. Ah- in that case the cap jewel may well just lift out once the screws are removed. Joe- the stud is just sitting on the cock, held by the screw. With the screw out it will just shift over off the cock, no danger. Similar studs were used on many high end pieces, particularly marine chronometers.
    2 points
  5. This tool was sold as "tool for filing balance screws". Hence the "unknown" pin. Funny that the tool is still made with that pin without knowing its reason ?. I had searched some time for # 30673 until I found mine. I use it rarely but I am happy I have it when I need it. Frank
    2 points
  6. I made some parts for this balance tool i Solidworks and 3D print out the parts in PLA a very strong plastic, even case openersw resist the forces, otherwise it is good to make different movements holders.
    2 points
  7. And I agree with watchweasol, in that if the bezel is NOT separate (Which is why we need the sharp focus side view- to determine that), you will need to remove the crystal with that crystal lift shown. I have the same one (well, an antique Vigor branded one), and it works great (once the decomposed rubber bands inside that open the fingers are replaced)! They are replicated in China now, so should not be too expensive. Another idea: if you can get the crown and stem out, re-install the back, and try an air pump at the crown tube to pop the crystal out. (but you'll still need the lift
    1 point
  8. Then if it's also resistant to human caused damage, that would make it the greatest thing ever!
    1 point
  9. Thank you very much! I can't today (parts to inspect) but I'll work up some refined drawings and go out for quote. Out of curiosity, is anyone else interested in one of these? Making three will be expensive per piece, but price will drop with quantity. Tolerance will be somewhat loose, so that helps control cost as well. Dies and movement holders have tighter tolerance, so higher cost despite their relative simplicity.
    1 point
  10. what I will try to remember to do is to take the other camera to work today. I have a specific camera I use whatever I'm doing watch photos. The problem with the picture of the tool it doesn't really show how it really works. so I think getting a picture would be a lot easier than trying to explain it the tool works really well.
    1 point
  11. Tudor is on the money. You may require atool like the one attached if the watch doesn't have a removable bezel a little light reading attached. Gruen-Watchmaking-Lessons (4).pdf Gruen-Horological-Text (4).pdf
    1 point
  12. In my watch repair book, there is a section on dealing with positional error. It has a really great chart (I copied it for my work area), which shows "the error", the position, and what to do about it. Also, it reminds us to know when it's "good enough". One take away, without referring to the book I don't have handy, is that for a wrist watch, dial up and pendant down are the two positions of greatest interest. If the wearer has the watch on the right wrist, then pendant up and dial up, with less fiddling with other positions, to reduce hair loss. And from those two positions, their average s
    1 point
  13. Beta is a bespoken Italian tools brand. Got this from their shop but I couldn't stand the wobbling seconds hand and noise. So I got a Seiko sweep seconds mov.t which legitimated the label where it said quartz before. Also replaced the glass with a thicker one. Thermometer is far from accurate but one can't get everything in life ?
    1 point
  14. A lot of what makes a watch "chrono" grade is simply the hairspring. I read that sometimes at Mercer they would abandon a given hairspring, sometimes after days (weeks) of adjusting, as it just wouldn't rate correctly. A friend of mine who worked at Hamilton during the war told me one of the bosses in the prototype lab took a rated marine chronometer, and changed the escapement from spring detent to pin lever to demonstrate how fabulous the Hamilton Elinvar Extra hairspring was (mated to their ovalizing balance)- it still rated well within the federal standard for marine chronometers.
    1 point
  15. You will be able to clean and oil that particular area without removing the Driving Wheel. It can be easily damaged even if you use a proper tool. Warning! ?
    1 point
  16. Hello all, What a great site!. I really like your spirit of sharing knowledge and providing support in a positive way. As way of introduction, here's a bit about myself: I've been involved for decades with using and analyzing many things microscopic. I frequently work at the the 10's of micrometers scale, so the skills of working under magnification, and manipulating minuscule items with precision tools has become second nature. My interest in watch repair grew out of my desire to maintain old precision instruments. As a casual collector of old clocks, compasses, dial gauges, a few watche
    1 point
  17. That strap looks good on there. Now it looks "retro" rather than "old". For whatever that's worth...
    1 point
  18. I think that sums it up well. Coming from the "old days" at Omega, they would pick the cream of the crop for "Kew Observatory" testing. The held very tight tolerance on everything, so they had a very low failure rate overall, but like anything made in quantity, there are always some that stand out- particularly regarding positional error. The old Omega Constellation watches had always held the best of the best movements, and I believe at one time Omega held the highest quantity of Kew certified movements. Any of them, from the pre-quartz era can be made to perform at that level,
    1 point
  19. There's a tool for this. I don't really know a good way to remove it without the tool. The driving wheel is a friction fit on an extended pivot on the 3rd wheel, and it's quite easy to bend it or break it. The tool reaches between the spokes and lifts the wheel, pressing on the bridge. There's one for even spoke wheels and odd spoke wheels.
    1 point
  20. Love this, the red really pops, oh so 70s!
    1 point
  21. I see the stud screw now, so I just loosen it, unless the stud slides outward easy, DO NOT DIRECTLY PUSH ON THE STUD AS YOU WOULD BE PUSHING ON BALANCE PIVOTS TOO, I use a pair of tweezers, hold the tweezers at 45 degree one arm push on the stud, another under stud holder. You just want to break the stud loose off of its hole, it can then be easily pushed out when the cock is removed, hold your hand about a cm above bench and drop the balance on tissue paper, cloth for low altitude soft landing.
    1 point
  22. 1- Generally a chrono grade balance will be made from Glucydur, a copper beryllium alloy. It's hard and stable and works well with Nivarox alloy. The hairspring will be Nivarox 1 or equivalent. The jewels will be of extra high quality. 2- The machines used will be the same. But different materials and less control set the pieces apart 3- The main difference is the higher quality materials, as above. On more "boutique" movements, that aren't mass produced, there might be an emphasis on extra finishing of pinion leaves and pivots, perhaps using convex face olive hole jewels, or adding
    1 point
  23. On a watch like that I will unscrew the stud with the balance and cock in the watch, then gently slide the stud off the cock. Unscrew cock and lift off, remove balance from movement. With the cock off set it on a bench block so you don't bend the pins while loosening the screws for the cap jewel. Then, on these American pieces, the hole jewel and cap jewel will normally press out (they are both mounted in an individual setting). They made star-like "jewel pushers" with different sized brass tips, but you can press them out with pegwood normally. If they are stubborn then best to use a jeweling
    1 point
  24. No doubt removing the two little screws is the prefered approach and less risky with balance detached from the cock, since you would have more control an can push down on the screw as hard as needed, if placed on hard surface. I can't see how stud is to be safely detached from this particular cock !! with regular screw stud type, it is safer, if you loosen the stud screw when the cock and balance are still mounted on mainplate. I usually put some penetrating oil on both little screws and attepmt the unscrew next day. Hope this helps.
    1 point
  25. then, there's the dilemma of removing old staff from balance to install a new one and I'd need a lathe for that too! this repair is growing legs just as I sit here and type! ?
    1 point
  26. Seems a sensible approach jdrichard. Thanks, I'll probably give that a go tomorrow evening.
    1 point
  27. I would just grab the complete balance cock and lift it out while tilting the movement to allow the balance to come out. The put the whole lot on a balance tack and loosen the screws. Then take the balance off the tack and support the balance on a metal block with holes to support the balance. Lower the balance cock / bridge for Americans:) so the hairspring has little tension and take the stud out. Now you have the balance bridge on its own to work in the upper cap jewel. my guess:)
    1 point
  28. did you notice when you are working on the watch that their serial numbers on all of the plates? There is even usually a serial number on the balance wheel. This is because American pocket watches initially even though there's a parts book even though interchangeability was supposed to exist the parts are usually hand fit. A lot of it depends on which company did the manufacturing and when they were manufactured. So it's usually a bad idea to start swapping parts between different movements. a important rule to remember when replacing balance staffs is to always measure the old one ver
    1 point
  29. Thats what I do, if you assess removing the bumps would let the cock down enough for pivot to fully enter jewel hole, I,d give it a try. its easy, wont cost anything and levels the cock with gears bridge.
    1 point
  30. I would do as Nickelsilver recommended: adapt the screw. A basis and strict rule in watchmaking is: never alter the original movement parts, but adapt the replacement part to fit! Frank
    1 point
  31. First of all the inner part of the bearing will be particularly hard steel, so drilling with anything other than carbide will be quite difficult. Then, is this a new bearing? Or new rotor? Did the nut not fit before? Easiest thing would be to modify the nut, but will need a lathe for that. If you really want to drill it, and have tools that will cut it, then fill the race with super glue. Drill. Soak in acetone to remove super glue (do one to remove, and then a clean soak to get any remaining residue).
    1 point
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